Iowa Wesleyan College

About the Catalog

2015-16 Catalog

The Iowa Wesleyan University Catalog is a yearly publication that lists the academic programs: majors, minors, certificates, policies, and procedures for the institution on an academic year basis. The catalog also documents the fiscal, curricular, and co-curricular programs. Included are also the college calendar, course descriptions, faculty and staff, and the Board of Trustees.

Iowa Wesleyan (IW) offers this electronic version of the catalog with the link at the top to convert the catalog into a PDF. Archived catalogs are available for review in the IW Registrar's Office, and digital archives are available at the link in the sidebar.

This catalog will be updated yearly. Every effort has been made to make the catalog accurate as of the date of publication. However, all policies, procedures, fees, and charges are subject to change at any time by appropriate action of the faculty, the college administration, or the Board of Trustees of Iowa Wesleyan University.

Updates to the Catalog

The curriculum process is governed by the Vice President for Academic Affairs, the Curriculum Committee, the Faculty Executive Committee, and the faculty. The curriculum approval process generally consists of a proposal from the department/program level, approved by the department/program committee (if applicable), University Curriculum Committee, and the VPAA, and the Faculty.

Catalog updates are generally processed with approvals from Divisions, University, Faculty, and Curriculum Committee representatives. Editing begins in late February with course changes due to the Office of the Registrar by June 1. Publication is set for July of the current academic year.

See the catalog update form on the registrar's website for more details on how to make changes to the catalog.

Accreditation / Compliance

Accreditation

Iowa Wesleyan University is a four-year coeducational college of liberal arts and sciences related to the United Methodist Church. Iowa Wesleyan University is accredited by the Higher Learning Commission of the North Central Association of Colleges and Schools. The Commission is located at 230 S. LaSalle Street, Suite 7-500, Chicago, IL 60604-1413. Telephone: 1.800.621.7440. Website: www.ncahlc.org.

Iowa Wesleyan is also accredited by the Iowa Department of Education and the University Senate of the United Methodist Church. The Nursing Program is approved by the Iowa Board of Nursing (IBON, Riverpoint Business Park, 400 SW 8th St., Suite B, Des Moines, IA 50309; 515.281.3255) and has been accredited with the Accreditation Commission for Education in Nursing (ACEN), 3343 Peachtree Road NE, Suite 850 Atlanta, GA 30326; 404.975.5000. The University is approved by the government training program under the Veteran's Bill (550 and 894).

Compliances

It is the policy of Iowa Wesleyan University not to discriminate on the basis of race, color, national origin, gender, disability, age, religion, creed, sexual orientation or gender identity in the provision of its educational programs and in its employment policies and practices. Questions, concerns or complaints should be addressed to the Office of Human Resources, 319.385.6209.

Iowa Wesleyan University complies with the Family Education Rights and Privacy Act of 1974--Public Law 93-380. A full statement of the policy of Iowa Wesleyan University on the Access to and Release of Student Data/Information is on file with the Vice President for Academic Affairs, the Dean of Admissions and the Dean for Student Life.The University reserves the right to make changes in the offerings and regulations contained in this Catalog without notice.

Mission, Vision, Values

Learning in Community: An Academic Vision

The story of Iowa Wesleyan University is a story of community; its founding, an act of community; its long history, an affirmation of community. Its defining vision draws on a community of memory even as it forges a dynamic future.

More than a century and a half ago, Iowa Wesleyan University was born in a frontier settlement imbued with a yearning for culture, a Methodist-led zeal for education, and a bold, impelling vision. The impulse and the forces for action were at work in the founding of the college.

In January of 1842, a bill "to incorporate a Literary Institute at Mount Pleasant" was passed by the Iowa Territorial Legislature. Trustees were authorized to begin the work of arranging finances, appointing professors and drawing up rules of conduct. On March 11, 1843, nine years after the town was founded, four Mount Pleasant citizens donated twenty acres in four adjoining plots to enable trustees to "erect a suitable building on some part of the donation, which should be used and forever appropriated as an institution of higher learning."

Iowa Wesleyan University pioneered daring and unconventional educational policies and practices. Soon after its founding, it admitted and graduated women, its first black student, its first international student and its first female law student who had earlier become the first woman admitted to the bar in the United States. Though Iowa Wesleyan's history records repeated challenges to its stability, resilience and faith in the future have continued to draw the University through turbulent times.

Energized and guided by historic memory, Iowa Wesleyan University respects individuality within the context of a community with common moral purpose, a community that welcomes persons of diverse backgrounds and world views. In so recognizing both immediate and global dimensions of civic membership, individual aspirations are tied to the aspirations of all, echoing John Wesley's declaration "The world is my parish."

Committed to joining the development of the intellect with the realities of life, the Iowa Wesleyan experience values service to others, preparation for a life of rewarding work, the acquisition of enduring knowledge to enhance the ability to engage in common discourse and appreciate varieties of expression. It fosters a love of learning, a desire for civility, and the release of human potential.

Life Skills Learning Outcomes

The Iowa Wesleyan University Institutional Learning Outcomes - the "Life Skills" - of Communication, Problem Solving, Valuing, and Social Effectiveness were originally adopted as Institutional Learning Outcomes in 1982. The faculty and administration at the time determined that "purposeful education is that educational process that serves its students best not merely by transmitting knowledge but by equipping them with broad and necessary adaptive skills as well." These Life Skills help foster coherence across the curriculum and in all elements of co-curricular life. They embrace the meaning of community to include learning from each other and from the whole of the larger community to which Iowa Wesleyan University belongs.

As the university and its curricula have evolved since that time and as necessary graduate skills have changed, it became apparent there was a need to review both the scope and nature of the university's institutional learning outcomes. Still called "Life Skills," beginning in 2015, the university revised the original four Institutional Learning Outcomes into three overarching Institutional Learning Outcomes:

  • Communication: Students will show proficiency in acquiring, processing, and transferring information in a variety of ways, including written communication, oral communication, and information literacy.
  • Critical Reasoning: Students will strategically apply critical thinking and problem-solving skills.
  • Civic Engagement: Students will develop the knowledge, skills, values, and motivation to actively engage in communities to promote social justice and human welfare.

Iowa Wesleyan University History

The historic founding of Iowa Wesleyan University is rooted in the religious, educational and cultural aspirations of early settlers in the frontier settlement of Mount Pleasant. Their aspirations were shaped by an impelling vision

and a bold determination to build an institute of learning in the rapidly developing southeast corner of the Iowa Territory. On February 17, 1842, the Territorial Legislature granted a charter for the Mount Pleasant Literary Institute, later named the Mount Pleasant Collegiate Institute.

On March 8, 1843, Aristides Joel Priest Huestis, a New Englander by birth, signed a contract, the first dated document of the Institute, to act as Agent for raising money and supervising construction of the Institute Building. Three days later, four Mount Pleasant residents donated twenty acres of land in four adjoining plots so that trustees could "within three years from this date erecta substantial building on some part of said donation, which building shall be used and forever appropriated as an institution of higher learning."

Nearly three years later, in their minutes of November 11, 1845, trustees record: "Resolved by the board of Trustees we deem it expedient to elect a faculty and open a school on the first Monday in January next." On that same date, they also named Huestis the President of the Institute.

Classes began in the Institute Building, now known as Pioneer Hall, with two professors: President Huestis, who taught Natural and Moral Science and belles lettres, and Johnson Pierson, who taught ancient languages and literature. Mathematics was added to the curriculum later that year.

James Harlan was named President of the Institute in 1853. Known as a man of national and political interests, Harlan, an Iowa City lawyer and businessman, determined to advance the educational status of the Institute. He successfully raised funds to construct a second building, now Old Main, and expanded the curriculum, adding political economy and theology, as well as piano, drawing, French and German classes. At his urging, on February 15, 1855, the Institute's name was changed to Iowa Wesleyan University

to emphasize its enlarged college program and its sponsorship by the Iowa Conference of the Methodist Episcopal Church, granted in 1849. On July 1, 1912, Iowa Wesleyan college became Iowa Wesleyan University.

The first college-level graduate of Iowa Wesleyan was Winfield Scott Mayne who earned a B.A. degree in 1856. In 1859, Lucy Webster Killpatrick was the first woman granted a B.A. degree at Iowa Wesleyan. Belle Babb Mansfield, the first woman to be admitted to the bar in the United States, graduated from Iowa Wesleyan in 1866. Susan Mosely Grandison, the first female black graduate, earned her degree in 1885. Keyroku Miazaki from Tokyo, Japan, who attended 1890-91, was the first documented international student. In 1958, Iowa Wesleyan graduate James Van Allen discovered the earth's radiation belts. These radiation belts now bear his name. In 2007, alumna Peggy Whitson, NASA astronaut, became the first female commander of the International Space Station. She set the U.S. record with 377 days in space on two missions: 2002 and 2007-08.

Through the years, the University has pioneered in such features as coeducation, the laboratory approach to teaching in the sciences, and service learning, adopted in 1967. More recently it has implemented an experiential learning program that integrates its Life Skills emphases with service learning and career experience into each student's education. To prepare students for responsible citizenship and fulfilling careers, this program combines a broad-based liberal arts curriculum with community service learning opportunities and Internship in the chosen field of study.

Iowa Wesleyan maintains a close affiliation with the United Methodist Church, from which it derives its sensitivity for spiritual values in social justice and human welfare, local, national and international. In its distinctive role among the many institutions of learning in America, Iowa Wesleyan holds fast to the ideals of its founding vision, while fostering creativity and the pursuit of truth in its developing curricular framework of Learning in Community.

Academic Program

Experiential Learning

The Iowa Wesleyan University academic program features an innovative approach to education, blending the positive elements of the liberal arts tradition with career opportunities to offer a distinctive model that effectively bridges academic and career goals. It gives all students professional experience and career-related skills before graduating, making them better prepared for career opportunities and community contributions.

Experiential learning provides an integrated approach to prepare students for graduate schools, careers and other facets of personal and professional life. This includes:

  • a curriculum-wide emphasis on Life Skills
  • service-learning
  • career experience as well as a career emphasis in student activities, college work-study and other campus opportunities.

This distinctive academic program offers students a solid liberal arts education with a strong career focus.

Life Skills

The liberal arts emphasis, anchored by the Life Skills program, helps students develop a better understanding of the world by ensuring that each student has a broad exposure to a wide range of subjects and experiences. A core of liberal arts courses is part of the curriculum for all students, to assure that each is exposed to varied class experiences which range across the entire spectrum of academic disciplines. Electives within each program allow each student to include courses that meet individual needs within the total curricular program.

Iowa Wesleyan is distinct among institutions of higher education in that it measures the progress of its students in three life skill areas:

    • Communication: Students will show proficiency in acquiring, processing, and transferring information in a variety of ways, including written communication, oral communication, and information literacy.
    • Critical Reasoning: Students will strategically apply critical thinking and problem-solving skills.
    • Civic Engagement: Students will develop the knowledge, skills, values, and motivation to actively engage in communities to promote social justice and human welfare.

These skills emphasized across the curriculum, are applicable to the athletic field, the residence hall experience, and the campus employment assignment as well as to the classroom and the laboratory. All of these furnish opportunities for significant learning, especially when experienced students and the faculty help newer students to begin reflecting upon the meaning of their activities.

Such skills are in fact the essence of a liberal arts education, for long after the information learned for a final exam is forgotten these skills enable graduates to rise to fresh challenges and develop a pattern of lifelong learning.

Iowa Wesleyan believes that students master these adaptive skills most effectively through a combination of performance and reflection rather than by passive classroom styles that fail to engage the student in responsive, authentic learning.

The Center for Service-Learning & Civic Engagement

Powerful learning ... significant service

The mission of the Iowa Wesleyan Center for Service-Learning and Civic Engagement is to prepare future graduates for global stewardship by fostering learning through service. For more than forty years, Iowa Wesleyan University's students and alumni have been actively engaged in service in Southeast Iowa and around the world making our Center one of the oldest civic engagement programs in the country. In 1967, Iowa Wesleyan University developed the concept of Responsible Social Involvement (RSI) chiefly as the university's response to the then-prevalent outburst of student-led social activism. Since this program's inception, more than 7,600 students have served over 1.25 million hours. In the spring of 2009, RSI was renamed The Center for Service-Learning & Civic Engagement to more accurately reflect the evolution of our program across academic disciplines and community initiatives. The main objective of this program is to provide students an opportunity to express their values and ideals for social action within a context of guided co-curricular and course-based learning.

What is Civic Engagement?

Civic engagement is active collaboration that builds on the resources, skills, expertise, and knowledge of the campus and community to improve the quality of life in our communities in a manner consistent with our mission. Civic engagement can take many forms such as individual volunteerism, actively advocating democracy, and participating in organized service- learning course projects.

Course-based, Academic Service-Learning, an Iowa Wesleyan University requirement

For those who are familiar with this form of pedagogy (teaching and learning), there are many definitions of service-learning being utilized across University campuses. Like many of today's top institutions, Iowa Wesleyan University defines academic service-learning as a course-based, credit-bearing, experience in which students participate in an organized service activity that meets identified community needs and reflects on the service activity in such a way as to gain further understanding of course content, a broader appreciation of the discipline, and an enhanced sense of civic responsibility. (Bringle & Hatcher, 1996, p. 2)

Tiered System

Students at IW are required to be civically engaged but it is our hope that through their experience they are inspired to continue serving in and throughout our global communities.

Traditional Day students will complete academic service-learning courses as part of their graduation requirements. The number of SL courses students must complete varies, based on each student's entrance to Iowa Wesleyan University as a degree seeking candidate.

  1. Students who start as freshmen will complete 4 academic service- learning courses.
  2. Students who start as sophomores (minimum of 24 hours earned) will complete 3 academic service-learning courses.
  3. Students who start as juniors (minimum of 56 hours earned) will complete 2 academic service-learning courses.
  4. Students who start as seniors (minimum of 88 hours earned) will complete 1 academic service-learning course.

*Academic service-learning courses are marked with an (SL) or (SL#) in the course schedule. SL# indicates that the course has an optional service-learning project. Students should be sure to work with their advisors to register for SL classes each academic year.

Adult and Graduate Studies students will complete WS320, Leadership and Service. This service-learning course is AGS students' only mandatory service requirement for their degree.

Co-curricular volunteerism

The Center for Service-Learning and Civic Engagement encourages students to get involved in other non-credit-bearing volunteer opportunities as well. Many organized clubs offer ways to serve others from awareness campaigns to local community clean up-projects. Additionally, the Center for Service- Learning and Civic Engagement is building more opportunities for students to get involved with alternative break offerings. Watch for emails and information about Fall, Spring, and Summer alternative break trips.

Internships

Internship Mission Statement

The Office of Internship at Iowa Wesleyan University supports the mission of the University by combining the values of a liberal education with those of professional preparation. Internships are a key component of how our programs provide opportunities to acquire the necessary theoretical and applied knowledge, which permits students to function effectively in professional life and a changing global environment. Working with practicing professionals provides students the opportunity to integrate theory with practical learning. As part of a student's participation in the Internship process, they will be evaluated in the workplace regarding the Institutional Learning Outcomes of Communication, Critical Reasoning and Civic Engagement. While participating in experiential learning programs, students will face challenges and issues which they will continue to encounter throughout their professional careers.

Rationale and Process

The Internship program at Iowa Wesleyan University is an academic class in an atypical classroom setting - the real world. Each student is required to complete an Internship (education and nursing excluded) by attaining experience outside the classroom from field experts and professionals. In doing so, students will earn a minimum of six (6) hours of academic credit, which translates to 240 clock hours in one or more professional placements. Working with accomplished professionals in their field, students apply their academic knowledge and abilities while learning additional "hands on" knowledge and skills. Internship at Iowa Wesleyan University provides each student with an individual and unique opportunity. Through numerous Internship sites of diverse work settings and employees, each experience is singular and unique to the student involved.

Typically, students complete the Internship requirement in their junior or senior year. The experience is designed to be a learning process - from initial contact to the final hour at the site. The student initiates the process early in their junior year by speaking with their advisor about the Internship requirement. The next step is to contact the Office of Career Development and Internship. During the initial meeting with the Director, the student receives a divisional folder, including all documents related to the arrangement and completion of the experience. It is important to note that approval of experiences, by the student's advisor and divisional liaison, must happen before the last scheduled class day in the semester prior to the work. Note: the approval deadlines for summer and fall experiences are the same (prior to the last scheduled class day of spring semester).

The Office of Career Development & Internships, located on the second floor of the John Wesley Holland Student Union, assists in guiding the student through the Internship process while also monitoring the student's progress. The Internship process is "career oriented," assisting the student in the development of a résumé, job hunting skills, communication with professionals, interviewing experience and others in addition to the on-site experience.

Faculty in the student's major approves their Internship prior to the beginning of on-site participation or hours. The designated divisional liaison also assigns the student's grade at the completion of the experience. The Internship requirement benefits students in many ways, including:

  1. As students seek placement they practice career-building skills, including researching prospective employers, résumé construction and interviewing.
  2. As students complete the experience they build relationships with professionals who can serve as mentors as the student seeks out their own career path. Additionally, our surveys of students show these experiences often produce offers of employment.
  3. Students are able to utilize classroom skills in a professional setting. They assess how their strengths and interests match employment trends in the field while gaining the confidence and experience essential to their early success as professionals.

Types of Internship

Students satisfy the Internship requirement by completing one or more of the following:

Internship - Advanced, intensive professional work experience usually completed in an off-campus setting; 6-14 credit hours. Internships are arranged through the Office of Career Development & Internships.

Career Applications - Employed students may arranged a professional learning project - including research, case studies and professional problem solving - in their current place of employment. Each project is for 2 - 6 credit hours, with the precise number of hours depending upon the student's major. Career Applications are arranged through the Office of Career Development & Internships and are completed in an off-campus setting.

Practicum - Preliminary practical experience often gained in a campus office or laboratory; generally 2 - 3 credit hours. Faculty members in each division arrange and supervise practica. In some majors, a practicum (398) may be used for partial completion of Internship.

* Education student teaching and Nursing clinical placements are determined through the individual divisions and are organized by regulatory and accrediting requirements. These types of Internships are not arranged through the Office of Career Development & Internships.

Internship & Transfer Students

The Internship requirement is satisfied through placements arranged and approved by Iowa Wesleyan University faculty. Transfer students pursuing the Internship requirement while taking course work at Iowa Wesleyan should make an appointment with the Director of Career Development & Internships immediately after beginning their degree work at Iowa Wesleyan.

The requirement is not satisfied by credits earned as part of an Associate of Arts, Associate of Science or Associate of Applied Science degree. Only upper level (300 and 400) Internship credit earned at a four-year institution may be transferred. In order to be transferred the Internship must have a grade assigned to it prior to transfer. Transfer students who have completed Internship coursework at another four-year institution should consult the Registrar who will consult with the Director of Career Development & Internships as well as faculty in the student's major to determine whether the Internship requirement has been met.

Internship & Double Majors

Students who elect to complete more than one major might satisfy the Internship requirement with a single placement if the placement directly relates to each of the majors the student is pursuing. This placement must satisfy the requirements of each of the majors and must be approved by faculty in each major.

Students with double majors can also opt to undertake more than one Internship. Some academic departments view a separate internship for each major to be professionally beneficial. Students should check with their academic advisor and the Director of Career Development & Internships about their options.

Internship & Adult and Graduate Studies Students

Internship is an academic requirement and is therefore required of all students earning a degree at Iowa Wesleyan University. Learners in the Adult and Graduate Studies program benefit from Internships which enhance their current professional abilities or mark the transition from current duties to the new opportunities their degree equips them to pursue.

Adult learners often face logistical problems in completing Internship while maintaining their current employment and/or other obligations. One option, for the Adult and Graduate Studies student, is the Site Based Analytical Project, an Internship completed at the student's current workplace. Students work with professionals in their field to conceive a project distinct from their current duties. The project requires research, proposal building or project planning in the student's field. Analytical projects are usually completed under the supervision of a professional who does not normally supervise the student in his/her regular duties. The Site Based Analytical Project places a premium on the student's initiative, both in conceiving projects and seeing them through to completion. Proposals made by the student need not be implemented by the employer in order for academic credit to be awarded.

Internship & Nontraditional Students

Non-traditional students (aged 25 or older at the time of submitting an official petition), with appropriate previous or current professional experience, may petition to pursue a coursework option. If the petition were approved, the student would complete a corresponding number of credit hours (customarily 6) in their major at the 300 level or above in lieu of the customary Internship requirement. These courses would not be drawn from courses previously taken. All petition materials should be obtained from, and inquiries directed to, the Director of Career Development & Internships.

Career Preparation

Iowa Wesleyan's experiential learning program helps prepare students for direct entry into careers in many fields. The following list is illustrative:

  • Business Administration (see the Division of Business)
  • Law enforcement and corrections (see Criminal Justice major in the Division of Science)
  • Music teaching (school & studio), performance, music business & sales (see Division of Humanities)
  • Human services and nonprofit work (see Psychology major in the Division of Science)
  • Teaching - early childhood, elementary, and secondary levels (see Division of Education)

May Travel

Following Commencement in May, faculty may elect to offer travel courses. Any student who has been enrolled full-time during the immediately preceding spring semester or AGS students the preceding two terms combined to equal FT equivalent and who are in good academic and financial standing may take a travel course and receive academic credit for no additional tuition. Students would pay travel costs. The amount of academic credit will be determined for each course by the Academic Council following receipt of course proposals.


Academic Enhancement

Library

The mission of Chadwick Library is to support the educational goals of Iowa Wesleyan University by providing collections, services, facilities and staff to meet the needs of the Iowa Wesleyan University academic community. Chadwick Library is open seven days a week for 82 hours of service each week during the academic year.

Library resources include a collection of 109,000 volumes, a variety of current print subscriptions, as well as over 36 electronic databases. The Library is also home to the Iowa Wesleyan University Archives, Archives of the Iowa Conference of the United Methodist Church, and the Newsome Special Collections Room.

Access to the library collection is provided through Wesley, the library's on- line catalog. Links to electronic books, periodical databases, discipline-related web sites, and other on-line resources are provided through the Chadwick Library home page (http://chadwick.IW.edu/). Off-campus students can access these same resources with a campus network id and password from the Iowa Wesleyan ITS office.

Along with locally owned resources, the collections of 17,000 other libraries throughout the world are accessible through the Library's membership in OCLC, an international cataloging and interlibrary loan network. Through OCLC's FirstSearch and through access to the Internet, librarians and patrons have access to research databases beyond the Library's walls.

As members of the principle academic support service on campus, librarians are committed to teaching the skills that enable students to become information literate in an era when the individual has almost limitless information choices and may have to select information from a wide range of reliable and unreliable sources. Librarians assist students in locating information for class assignments and research projects. Instruction in information retrieval is available through classroom lectures, special seminars, and printed materials. Operating under a point-of-need contact philosophy, students learn both basic and advanced research skills. Chadwick Library offers an outstanding learning environment which combines the best of traditional collections with advanced information technologies to prepare students for lifelong learning.

Office of Academic Success and Inclusive Support (O.A.S.I.S.)

The Office of Academic Success and Inclusive Support (OASIS) exists to help students develop the skills needed to be successful in a liberal arts college environment and to become independent learners. The goal is to help students to not only succeed at Iowa Wesleyan University, but also become lifelong learners and to excel in areas of academic interest. To promote the Life Skills emphasis of the college, the OASIS offers academic support services as needed.

The OASIS offers several courses for academic credit ARC105: College Learning and Reading Efficiency (3 hrs.), ARC200: Introduction to Peer Tutoring (one credit and approval of instructor needed), and ARC201: Advanced Peer Tutoring (one credit and approval of instructor needed), and ARC101: English Language Skills (3 hrs.). This course is designed for students who are Non-Native English speakers. IW students who are Non-Native English speakers also will be able to obtain additional help with language through meetings arranged with the OASIS Director for no credit.

While there are a variety of support services available in the OASIS, it is important that students take the initiative and responsibility to seek assistance for their academic needs. The OASIS is available to all students who would like help whether it be course tutoring, having a paper proofread, test preparation, or to find helpful study resources. Students may also be referred to the OASIS by course professors. Once the student comes for assistance, it is up to the student to continue to work hard and take responsibility to benefit from and make the best use of the services given.

For students who need special accommodations due to a diagnosed disability, it is recommended that they contact the OASIS Director (319-385-6376) and provide a copy of the student's Individual Education Program (IEP) or other professional documentation.

The OASIS may assist students by providing:

  • Tutors (free to Iowa Wesleyan students)
  • Individual help from the OASIS staff
  • A quiet study area
  • Time management resources
  • Pamphlets on various topics such as text anxiety, stress, successful studying, etc.
  • Computers with CD-ROM capability and internet access
  • Course and professional assistance in study strategies
  • Educational advice
  • Special accommodations as specified by the professional documentation

Any student desiring assistance should contact the OASIS, located on southwest corner of the top floor of the Library, or phone 319.385.6334.

Tutoring Services and Study Sessions

The OASIS is certified through the College Reading and Learning Association (CRLA). All students are encouraged to seek the help of a tutor in any subject with which they have difficulty. With the help of IW faculty, the OASIS attempts to recruit tutors for all subject areas. Faculty can recommend tutors by identifying students who understand the material and seem to get along well with others. Tutors need to have a minimum grade point average of 3.0, have the recommendation of the professor for the course being tutored, and received a grade of A or B in the course. Tutors are compensated through work study. If a student does not qualify for work- study, they may make arrangements with the OASIS director and Director of Service Learning for service learning hours.

Computing Resources

Several computer labs serve as instructional laboratories and general purpose computer facilities for students. The two computer labs located in Science Hall 114 and Chadwick Library are the largest on campus and serve the largest number of students. Other labs are located in OASIS, Art Program area, Chemistry area, Music area, Nursing area and Science Hall 111. All lab computers have Internet access, printing capability and software such as Microsoft Office.

Assessment

Extensive testing and data-gathering operations are conducted as a means of evaluating instructional effectiveness and documenting institutional progress. All first year students are requested to participate in the Beginning College Survey of Student Engagement (BCSSE) and both first year students and seniors are asked to complete the National Survey of Student Engagement (NSSE) shortly after the second semester begins. The Wesleyan Studies curriculum is evaluated through the use of the Collegiate Assessment of Academic Proficiency (CAAP) which compares ACT scores in Reading, Writing, Mathematics, Science Reasoning and Essay Writing with scores on similar examinations. These exams are given once the student has completed the basic curriculum. Additional evaluations are completed through Service- Learning and Internship which are required of all students. Major Field Tests (MFT) are given to graduating seniors in some majors at the end of the spring semester. Adult and Graduate Studies students are required to complete all testing related to the major field and the CAAP exams when participating in relevant courses. This program of testing is crucial to the design and evaluation of the College's emphasis on Life Skills.

All Iowa Wesleyan students are expected to participate, if requested, in addition- al institutional research/assessment that has been approved by the Vice President for Academic Affairs and/or the Vice President and Dean for Student Life.

Advanced Placement

The following advanced placement opportunities are available to all applicants for admission to Iowa Wesleyan University.

  • CEEB (College Entrance Examination Board) Special Advanced Placement tests are administered through local high schools. A student of superior ability and background may secure college credit on the basis of a rating of 3 on the CEEB Special Advanced Placement Test except for English credit which must be approved by the Division of Language and Literature.
  • CLEP (College Level Examination Program) subject matter tests are given at periodic intervals at various test centers throughout the country. CLEP is designed to provide opportunities for college-level credit to persons of varied backgrounds. Many people read widely; many receive on-the-job training; many watch educational programs on TV or take noncredit courses in continuing education programs offered by high schools, churches, clubs, etc. Many students who plan to pursue college careers do not have opportunities to take CEEB Special Advanced Placement tests through their local high school. The objective of CLEP is to help such people gain recognition in the form of college credit. The amount of credit for a particular test will be determined by the number of credit hours awarded by the Iowa Wesleyan University course(s) most analogous to the test(s) undertaken and on which the score is at the level to award credit as recommended by the Council on College-Level Examinations. A maximum of 30 credit hours may be earned in this manner; these hours may be applied toward the total hours required for graduation, or they may enable a student to undertake more work than would otherwise be possible. Students interested in undertaking the CLEP test(s) should critically evaluate their competence in the subject area(s) of interest to them. The examinations are not based on any one textbook but rather a composite of the many textbooks available for a particular subject. In the instance of high school students, consultation with the teachers under whom the student has taken the course(s) is recommended.
  • NURSING CREDIT--Iowa Wesleyan University participates in the Iowa Articulation Plan for progression of registered nurses towards the Bachelor of Science in Nursing.

Credit by Examination

Under extraordinary circumstances, Iowa Wesleyan students may choose to establish credit in selected courses by special examination. Written approval must be obtained from the Division Chair and the Registrar prior to taking the examination, which carries a fee per credit hour. See the Financial Information section for current cost.

Academic Standards

Degrees

Iowa Wesleyan University offers work leading to the Bachelor of Arts (B.A.), Bachelor of Science (B.S.), Bachelor of Science in Nursing (B.S.N.) degrees.

  1. Those programs where a B.A. is the only option are:
    1. English
    2. Christian Studies
    3. Music
    4. Visual Communication and Design

  1. Those programs where a B.S. is the only option:
    1. Biology
    2. Criminal Justice f. Human Services
    3. Pre-Medical Studies
    4. Mass Communication
    5. Elementary and Early Childhood Education l. Physical Education and Exercise Science
    6. Business Administration
  1. Requirements for the B.S.N. are unchanged.
  2. All majors in the Adult and Graduate Studies program will offer the B.S. or B.S.N. degree, with the option of a B.A. being made available when possible.
  3. A B.A. degree assumes a maximum number of hours in the major (generally 36). This allows for a substantial part of the student's program to be in areas outside the major. An exception will be the situation where Internship requirements cause the major to exceed 36 hours. Internship is a major requirement but is a requirement that does not deviate from the spirit of the liberal arts nature of the degree.

Multiple Majors

For those desiring two different degrees, 150 credit hours must be earned with at least 70 hours of upper level credit.

Majors

Students are asked to select a major within one of the academic divisions. They are assisted in this choice by means of faculty counsel and various assessment instruments. Their choice, however, need not be regarded as final, since they may change majors at any time prior to the beginning of their senior year.

Majors are offered in biology, business administration (concentrations in accounting, economics, management, marketing or human resource management), Christian studies, criminal justice, education (elementary or early childhood), educational foundations, English, exercise science and wellness, human services, music, nursing, physical education, pre-medical, psychology, visual communication and design. Courses accepted for major (or minor) requirements must carry a grade of "C-" or better. Nursing requires a "C" or better in nursing support courses and 80% or greater in all nursing courses.

With the help of IWU faculty, the OASIS attempts to recruit tutors for all subject areas. Faculty can help find tutors by identifying students who understand the material and seem to get along well with others. Depending on the situation, tutors can be compensated through work study or campus employment with the Financial Aid Office, or volunteering. Also, the OASIS will help organize review/study sessions if needed.

Each student is asked to choose a major no later than the second semester of the first year, even if it is only tentative.

Each division, for each type of major which it offers, has established models or schedules of courses encompassing tracks for students. Chairs of divisions and faculty advisors have copies of these models in a manual for advisors.

Required Course Distribution

All regular degree candidates (B.A., B.S. and B.S.N.) should observe the following:

  • At least 33 semester hours of the 124-hour total must be taken in Iowa Wesleyan University courses at the 300 or 400 level.
  • Except for the music, business, and nursing majors, and the approved divisional and dual-major concentrations, students may not accumulate more than 44 semester hours in the major toward the 124-hour graduation total.
  • Only those courses for which the student received a grade of "C-" or better will be counted toward the major.
  • Nursing requires a "C" or better in nursing support courses and 80% or greater in all nursing courses.

Pre-Professional Preparation

Iowa Wesleyan offers a combination of a liberal arts education with strong academic disciplines and practical, professional experience to enhance student's preparation for graduate and professional schools. Students are prepared to meet standards for admission to programs for advanced degrees in fields such as: Medicine, Physical Therapy, Chiropractic, Dentistry, Veterinarian Medicine, Medical Technology, Library Science, Pharmacy and Ministry.

In order to shorten the time period for those taking a pre-professional program, the College has arranged for candidates in some of the above fields to complete their undergraduate work in three years instead of four.

The Bachelor's degree will be awarded by Iowa Wesleyan upon satisfactory completion of certain prescribed units of graduate work. Details of the Law, Medical Technology and Chiropractic programs are in the Division of Science section of this Catalog.

Independent Study

  1. Students must have a cumulative grade point average of at least 2.00 and a grade point average of 2.30 in their major field to qualify for Independent Study courses.
  2. Independent Study courses can be taken by students only in their major or minor fields.
  1. Only juniors or seniors will be allowed to take Independent Study courses except that in unusual cases others might be allowed to do so upon petition to the Committee on Academic Standards and Review.
  2. Not more than one three-hour Independent Study course can be taken in one semester. Not more than six hours of Independent Study courses can be taken by any student during his or her undergraduate career.
  1. Approval by instructor and division chair for any Independent Study project is required. Forms are available in the Registrar's Office.

Satisfactory-Unsatisfactory Option

Juniors and seniors are entitled to register for one elective course each semester (including Summer Session) on a SATISFACTORY- UNSATISFACTORY grading basis. First year students and sophomores may petition the Committee on Academic Standards for this privilege.

Courses in the major, required support courses for the major, and Wesleyan Studies courses cannot be taken as "S-U" unless otherwise noted in the description of the majors.

The purpose of this option is to encourage students to take challenging course work outside their major fields. Accordingly, the "S-U" option reduces their grade risk; the results (whether "S" or "U") will not be averaged into their grade point average.

The student's decision to take a particular course as "S-U" is made at the time of registration. However, permission is granted within 10 class days after midterm of a semester to change an "S-U" to a letter grade registration. Analogous dates for summer and night courses will be decided by the Registrar.

Course Number Key

  1. Iowa Wesleyan courses are divided into four groups corresponding approximately to the sequence of college grade levels: first year, sophomore, junior, and senior.
    1. The following number sets correspond approximately to the four levels respectively: 100-199; 200-299; 300-399; 400-499
    2. First year students and sophomores are expected to elect courses numbered 100 to 299, for which they have the necessary prerequisites. Juniors and seniors are expected to elect courses numbered 300 to 499, for which they have the necessary prerequisites.
    3. However, under the Satisfactory-Unsatisfactory (S-U) option, junior and seniors are encouraged to enroll in courses numbered 300 to 499 outside their own major, where their grade (S or U) will not be a penalty for their lack of formal training in another major and where the grade will not be averaged into their cumulative grade point average. Ordinarily the student will be exempt from the prerequisites for these courses. If there is any question, the course instructor should be consulted.
  1. In general, the first term of a two-term course has an odd number and the second term of the course has an even number. The two terms of such a course may be given in a fall-spring or a spring-fall sequence. The student may receive credit for the first term of such a course without taking the second. Normally, students should not register for the second term unless they have taken the first term of the course. The instructor should be consulted if the second term is desired without or before the first term.

Credit Hours and Grade Points

All four-year degrees require the completion of 124 semester credit hours. The last 30 hours of any degree must be taken at Iowa Wesleyan University.

Up to 30 hours of extension and correspondence courses taken at other colleges and universities may be used toward a degree at Iowa Wesleyan University.

At least 33 hours of the student's work must be completed in Iowa Wesleyan University courses numbered 300 or above, and a grade point average of 2.00 (C) or above on all work taken is required for graduation. Each hour of credit is valued in points as follows:

A ........... 4.00

B ............. 3.00

C ........... 2.00

D ...........1.00

A-.......... 3.70

B- ............ 2.70

C-.......... 1.70

D-..........0.70

B+ ......... 3.30

C+ ........... 2.30

D+......... 1.30

F............0.00

A full-time student is one who carries 12 or more credit hours each semester. A customary load is 15-18 credit hours in each semester. However, students may, with the consent of their advisor, petition the Committee on Academic Standards for the privilege of taking additional hours. The basis for approval of petitions is exceptional ability as evidenced by high grades and/or unusual need.

Examinations and Grades

Midterm examinations normally will be given each term. Final examinations are given at the close of each term. Final course grades are based partly on examination and partly on other class work.

When students have been making passing grades but for rare extenuating circumstances, as in the case of illness, fail to complete their work before the end of the term, it may be recorded as incomplete (I). Completion of the required work within five weeks after the first day of the next regular semester entitles the student to a grade. An "I" not removed within that time will become an "F."

After the first 10 days of classes in the Fall and Spring terms, dropping or substituting courses is not permitted. Courses withdrawn from after these deadlines, until 10 class days after midterm of a semester, will be recorded as "W;" courses withdrawn thereafter will be recorded as "F." A different set of deadlines applies to courses taught during the evening on a once-per-week basis; see the Adult and Graduate Studies section of this Catalog.

Students may not receive credit in any course for which they have not completed their registration.

Students must make a grade of "C-" or better in every course designated as a requirement within their major(s) and minor(s), and for graduation must have a 2.00 GPA in the major as well as for the overall cumulative grade point average. Nursing requires a C or better in nursing support courses and 80% or greater in all nursing courses and a cumulative GPA of 2.25 for entering the program and 2.5 for continuing.

Classification of Students

Classification will be made at the beginning of each regular semester.

Sophomore: To rank as a sophomore a student must have completed a minimum of 24 credit hours.

Junior: To rank as a junior, a student must have met all first year and sophomore requirements, and have a minimum of 56 credit hours.

Senior: To rank as a senior, a student must have a minimum of 88 credit hours.

Repeated Courses

Students may repeat courses in which grades of "C" or below have been received. However, a course may be repeated only once and all grades are counted in the cumulative average. The second grade (provided it is a "C-" or above) can be counted toward the major. Nursing requires a "C" or higher in nursing support courses and 80% or greater in all nursing courses. Federal and state financial aid is not available to students that are required to retake all of the coursework for a term.

Transcripts

Transcripts of a student's academic record may be obtained from the Office of the Registrar upon written request and payment of the processing fee. Transcripts are the official record of the University and should not be confused with placement credentials.

Academic Policies

Definitions of Various Categories of Students

Degree Candidates

  1. Full-Time Degree Candidates
  2. Regular--students who have been admitted unconditionally as degree candidates on the basis of high school rank and test scores or on the basis of work completed at accepted colleges. "Regular" status means also that the student is not on probation. Students in this category are eligible to participate in all of the student activities of the College.
  3. Conditional--students who have been admitted on condition as defined by the Admissions Committee to work toward a degree. At the end of the semester their scholastic records are reviewed by the Committee on Academic Standards and Review.
  4. Probationary--students who fail to meet minimum standards of conduct or academic achievement.
  5. Part-Time Degree Candidates

In this category are all students who are carrying less than 12 hours in a semester and are working toward a degree. These students may be regular, conditional or probationary as defined above.

Special Students

  1. Non-degree students--students who are not interested in following a sequence of courses leading to a degree (including students who already have a degree and wish to qualify for a teaching certificate or who take courses in an area of special interest).

  2. Prep-students--high school students enrolled for college courses.

Grades are given and courses are counted for advanced placement if grades of "C-" or better are earned.

  1. Auditors--persons not regularly enrolled may attend classes as auditors, with no credit granted. Approval of the Academic Dean or Registrar must be secured. Permission must also be obtained from the instructor of the course, who may limit the extent of participation. Auditors must register and pay the appropriate fees.

NOTE:

  1. All persons including auditors and prep-students who wish to take any course at the College must first apply for admission to the College. (Persons from the community who take music lessons or who participate in college-sponsored community seminars are not required to apply for admission to the College.)
  2. Auditors must fulfill the audit attendance and participation policies as determined by the instructor or the audit will not be recorded on the student's transcript.
  3. An academic advisor is assigned to each student in the degree- candidate categories whether full-time or part-time. Non-degree students are not assigned advisors with the exception of those advanced students who are working toward a teaching certificate.

Class Attendance

  1. Students are expected to attend all class meetings for which they are registered. This is regarded as a matter of individual student responsibility.
  2. All faculty members are expected to keep accurate records of class attendance.
  3. In cases of excessive class absence, a professor may drop a student with a grade of "F."
  4. Required regular assignments, laboratory work and daily quizzes missed may be made up at the discretion of the professor.

Changes of Registration

  1. After the regular time of registration, all changes in a student's course schedule must be made through the Registrar's Office with the approval of the advisor on the Change-of-Registration form supplied by the Registrar.
  2. Student may not ADD a class after the FIRST 5 DAYS OF CLASSES in the Fall and Spring terms. Analogous periods for night and summer courses will be established by the Registrar.
  3. While students may DROP a class during the FIRST 10 CLASS DAYS, a student may not make a complete change of courses or begin a full-time registration after five class days following registration. For the summer, a student may not join a class after the first three class days.
  4. After the first 10 days, dropping is not freely permitted. Analogous periods for night and summer courses will be established by the Registrar.
  5. In the period between the end of the first 10 days of classes and 10 class days after midterm (in the Summer Session, the period will be determined by the Registrar) courses dropped with permission will have grades recorded as "W." A fee will be assessed for schedule changes during this period
  6. Withdrawal from courses is not permitted after 10 class days following midterm except for medical or other emergencies with the approval of the Academic Dean. Analogous periods for night and summer courses will be established by the Registrar.
  7. Insufficient attendance and failure to follow the procedure outlined above for dropping a course will result in an automatic grade of "F" in the course concerned.
  8. Official withdrawal from college is accomplished by completing an appropriate form supplied by the Office of Student Development and returning the completed form to the office. Failure to complete the form can result in the grade of "F" in all courses scheduled. (See the Financial Information section for complete information on withdrawal from college.)
  9. Students may withdraw their complete registration prior to the last 13 weekdays of the term. Following that time no one may withdraw. Students will receive "Ws" if proper withdrawal procedure is followed. Students registered for any other course that has been completed according to the class schedule will be permitted to retain that credit and/or grade. Analogous periods for summer session and night courses will be determined by the Registrar. No credit is given for the term. Following that time one may not withdraw.
  10. In the case of students withdrawing to enter the armed services, the following rules shall apply:
  • No credit will be allowed unless the student has been enrolled for at least five weeks in a Fall or Spring semester.
  • After 10 weeks of work in the Fall or Spring term, arrangements may be made to complete a full semester of work. Only fractional credit will be allowed unless arrangements are made to complete the entire term. Such credit may be blanket credit (i.e., unspecified), or it may be specified as the need arises by major and minor advisors. In any case, in order to get credit the student must be passing in the course work at the time of withdrawal.


Academic Petition

Waiver or amendment of academic regulations in this catalog will be considered by the Committee of Academic Standards and Review upon formal peti- tion. Petition forms are available from the Registrar. Petitions for changes affecting a current semester's registration must be received by noon of the third day of that semester.

Overload/Petition Requirement:

  • Students with a GPA below 2.0 are permitted to take a maximum of 13 credit hours per semester. They must petition for 14 or more hours.
  • Students with a GPA of 2.0 or greater may take a maximum of 18 credit hours before incurring overload charges.
  • All students must petition for permission to enroll in 19 or more hours.

Academic Appeals

Students who have concerns regarding an academic matter, such as procedures in a particular course or a grade received, should meet first with the instructor of the course involved. Failing to achieve satisfaction at this level, the student should then meet with the chair of the division in which the course is taught. Appeals beyond the divisional level should go to the Vice President for Academic Affairs. When appropriate, academic issues will be referred to the Committee on Academic Standards and Review for final decision.

Grade appeals must be initiated within five weeks of the time grades are posted. No such appeals will be considered after this time.

The Vice President for Academic Affairs is available to students to discuss academic problems and procedures.

Academic Honesty Policy

The curriculum at Iowa Wesleyan College is built upon the Life Skills-- communication, critical reasoning and civic engagement. In conjunction with these integral Life Skills, the University has developed a strict policy to deal with those students who commit acts of academic dishonesty--plagiarism and/or cheating. Such acts will not be tolerated in any form by the faculty and staff, and will carry stiff penalties. The following policy includes the definition of academic dishonesty, the sequence of offenses and their accompanying penalties, the procedure to be followed by faculty members when an offense occurs, the explanation of the appeal process, and the description of record maintenance.

Definition of Academic Dishonesty

Plagiarism is the intellectual theft of another's ideas. It involves the failure to accurately cite the sources used in researching a paper or project, both in the body of the paper/project as well as on the Works Cited page. Cheating constitutes all other forms of academic dishonesty. Offenses include, but are not limited to:

  • fabrication of data/data manipulation
  • use of crib sheets
  • copying of information from another person's work
  • unauthorized sharing of answers/information between students
  • theft of papers/projects/exams
  • unauthorized gaining of or giving access to exam questions
  • tampering with an exam
  • submission of a paper or project for more than one course without the permission of the faculty members for the courses in question
  • buying of a paper/project/exam
  • selling of a paper/project/exam

* This selling of a paper/project/exam is considered a more serious violation of the policy on cheating because of the deliberate attempt to profit from another student's vulnerability, and will carry heavier penalties (see Sequence of Offenses/Penalties section).

Sequence of Offenses and Accompanying Penalties

Violation of the academic Dishonesty Policy will subject the student to swift disciplinary action. For acts of cheating or plagiarism, the following sequence applies:

  • First offense-cheating-failing grade for the assignment or for the course, at the discretion of the faculty member.
  • First offense-plagiarism-alternative assignment, failing grade for the assignment, or for the course, at the discretion of the faculty member.
  • Second offense-may result in suspension from the College for one full academic term excluding summer
  • Third offense-may result in expulsion from the College

In instances when a student has been found guilty of academic dishonesty the student may not withdraw from the course in question. Suspensions for academic dishonesty will be noted on the student's transcript.

For the more serious violation of selling a paper/project/exam, the following sequence applies:

  • First offense-may result in suspension from the college for one full academic term excluding summer
  • Second offense-may result in expulsion from the College

Procedure for Handling Cases of Academic Dishonesty

Academic honesty calls for a partnership between students and faculty members. While it is the students' duty to submit honest work, the faculty also carries a share of the responsibility to the students. First and foremost, faculty members must present clear criteria concerning their expectations regarding all assignments. In the event of a violation, the faculty member will then institute the following procedure.

  1. Call the student in for a meeting within 72 hours after the discovery
  2. Review the evidence with the student and discuss the situation
  3. Decide the appropriate punishment for the first offense
  4. Document the violation and resulting action on the Academic

Violation Form

  1. Copy and send the form to the appropriate offices:
  2. Associate Vice President and Dean of Adult and Graduate

Studies (if applicable)

  1. Dean of Student Life
  2. Vice President of Academic Affairs

Appeal Process

There are two reasons on which students may base an appeal: 1) lack of concrete evidence, as perceived by the student; or 2) student's perception that the penalty imposed is unduly harsh. The following appeal process will be followed:

  1. The student will request an appeal in writing within 72 hours of receiving notice of the faculty member's decision regarding punishment.
  2. The appeal will be made to the chair of the division to which the course belongs.
  3. Failing to achieve a satisfactory solution at the divisional level the student may appeal to the Vice President for Academic Affairs.
  4. If the student disagrees with the decision of the Vice President for Academic Affairs, the Academic Dishonesty Committee/Board will hear the evidence and render their decision within 48 hours, and will notify the student promptly.
  5. If the student disagrees with the decision of the Academic

Dishonesty Committee/Board, he/she may request a final appeal

in writing to the President within 72 hours of receiving the board's decision. The President will notify the board of the appeal, will request a transcript of the hearing, and will call the student in for the final hearing within 48 hours of receiving the letter of appeal. The President will render the final decision and no further appeals will be entertained.

Record Maintenance

Documentation regarding all cases of academic dishonesty will be placed both in the student's file in the Office of Student Development, and on file in the Office of the Vice President for Academic Affairs. If a student who is attending Iowa Wesleyan College in an Adult and Graduate Studies program is found guilty of academic dishonesty, the office of the Associate Vice President and Dean of Adult and Graduate Studies will keep a copy of the documentation in the student's file.

Committee Structure for Academic Dishonesty Hearings

After receiving the letter of appeal, the Vice President for Academic Affairs will schedule a hearing with the Academic Dishonesty Committee/Board within seven days. This committee will consist of two faculty members, two administrators, and two students. One administrator will serve as chair. The Faculty Executive Committee will appoint one faculty member from each division who will serve on this committee when called. No faculty member from the division in which the case originated may serve. The Student Government Association will appoint two students to serve on the committee and the President of the College will appoint two administrators and indicate which shall serve as the committee chair. The student filing the appeal, the faculty member who reported the violation, the chair of the division in which the case originated and the Vice President for Academic Affairs may be called before the committee at the discretion of that body.

Academic Probation and Dismissal

Probation: Students whose cumulative grade point average is below

2.00 will be placed (or continued) on academic probation for the following term unless dismissed for academic reasons.

Any student on probation will be required to enroll in ARC 105 College Learning and Reading Efficiency in the semester of probation. This requirement will be in force each semester that the student is on probation. Students who withdraw from ARC 105 are subject to academic dismissal.

The probationary status is removed whenever the cumulative grade point average is raised to 2.00 or better. A student on "academic probation" will not be permitted to enroll for more than 15 credit hours (including 2 hours for ARC 105) unless a petition is approved by the Committee on Academic Standards. (See Overload/Petition Requirement above).

Academic Dismissal: Students who do not meet certain minimal standards are subject to academic dismissal whether or not they are currently on probation. The Committee on Academic Standards and Review shall have final judgment in such matters and shall use the following guidelines.

First Semester Enrollment

At the end of the first semester of full-time registration (12 credit hours or more) at Iowa Wesleyan and based upon Iowa Wesleyan credits attempted:

  1. All regularly admitted entering first year students (including transfer first year's) must have at least a 0.75 grade point average.
  2. All regularly admitted entering transfer sophomores must have at least a 1.50 grade point average.
  3. All regularly admitted entering transfer juniors must have at least a 1.75 grade point average.
  4. Continuing Enrollment.

All other students must meet the following grade point standards:

Credit hours attempted (Including Minimum cumulative grade accepted transfer credits) point average (IWC grades only)

0-15 .75

16-23 1.00

24-39 1.50

40-55 1.65

56-71 1.75

72-87 1.85

88-105 1.90

106-123 1.95

124- 2.00

Probation Suspension

Students, even when not below the foregoing minimal standards, will ordinarily be suspended if they have been on probation for three consecutive semesters, without bringing their cumulative Iowa Wesleyan University grade point average to 2.00 or above.

  1. Students required to take ARC 105B, 105C, or 105D who withdraw from the course.
  2. Suspension or Permanent Dismissal

Students that have been suspended twice for academic reasons will be considered dismissed and will not be readmitted to the University.

  1. Students may appeal for reconsideration of a vote of suspension by the Committee on Academic

Standards and Review. Upon reconsideration, the Committee may allow the student to continue on academic probation or uphold the decision to suspend. If the Committee upholds the suspension, the decision of the Committee will be final; no further appeal is possible.

Athletic Eligibility

All students who participate in intercollegiate athletics at Iowa Wesleyan University must have and maintain a minimum grade point average of 2.0 (based on a 4.0 scale) both cumulatively as well as each semester of attendance at Iowa Wesleyan to be considered eligible to participate in intercollegiate athletics. Those who fall below the cumulative or semester grade point average of 2.0 will be ineligible to participate in intercollegiate athletics at Iowa Wesleyan University. All student-athletes must be full-time students.

Dean's List

The Dean's List is issued following the Fall term and the Spring term to honor students who have shown high scholastic attainment during that term. In order to be included, a student must be classified as a degree candidate and have attained a grade point average for that term of 3.50 or better on a load of 12 credit hours or more, with no incomplete grades recorded at the time the list is declared.

All Dean's List students are eligible to audit one course without additional charge for overload (more than 18 hours) excluding on-line courses. The additional audit course in this case must always be taken during the semester immediately following the Dean's List achievement. For honors recognition of part-time students see Adult and Graduate Studies section of this catalog.

Honors at Graduation

Degree "with honor" will be indicated on the diploma by "cum laude" for students who secure an overall cumulative grade point average (GPA) of 3.50-3.74, by "magna cum laude" for those with an overall cumulative grade GPA of 3.75-3.89, and by "summa cum laude" for those with a GPA of 3.90-4.00 for all post-secondary coursework. To be eligible, 60 hours must be completed at Iowa Wesleyan.

Grades earned in all college work, regardless of where taken, will be counted for honors determination.

For students following a combined pre-professional course, this will be the sophomore and junior years. Students with honors level work in Iowa Wesleyan courses are designated as graduating "With Distinction."

Withdrawal from the University

Students may withdraw their complete registration prior to the last thirteen weekdays of the term. Following that time one may not withdraw. The withdrawal procedure is begun by first notifying the Vice-President and Dean of Student Development, Office of Student Development. Once this procedure is complete, the Dean of Student Development notifies the Business Office and accounts are computed as of the date of the notification of withdrawal. Failure to observe this procedure will result in the student's being considered not in good standing and in the forfeiture of refunds. Students may be administratively withdrawn from the University if after careful study the indications suggest they are a high risk to their own welfare or the welfare of other members of the community. After withdrawal, a residential student should make all necessary arrangements to check out of the residence hall within 24 hours. (See the Financial Information section of this catalog for more detail.)

Inter-Institutional Cooperation

The University seeks to enhance educational opportunities for students by means of inter-institutional cooperation. The library consortium with several regional institutions has been described under the Library section of this catalog. Cooperative programs with Duke University, Iowa State University and the University of Iowa are available.

In order to better serve the students of each institution, Iowa Wesleyan University and Southeastern Community College have established a cooperative agreement allowing full-time students at both institutions to take one course per term at the other institution at a standard tuition fee. The course should be unique to the institution, e.g., typing or engineering graphics. Interested students should consult with the Registrar for details, including class schedules and course descriptions. No duplicate activity fee will be charged, although guest students will have the student privileges which are normally given part- time students. Other forms of cooperation include reciprocal library check-out privileges, and a commitment by both institutions, through their various organizations, to strive to bring such cultural activities to southeast Iowa as musical activities and productions, art shows and lectures.

Adult and Graduate Studies

The Office of Adult and Graduate Studies (AGS) offers credit and noncredit courses, workshops, seminars, and conferences for learners in southeastern Iowa who are interested in completing a bachelor's degree, seeking personal enrichment or self-development, or pursuing programs toward career advancement. A variety of offerings are provided online and throughout southeastern Iowa at times and in locations convenient to the majority of working adults.

The Office of Adult and Graduate Studies cooperates with the academic divisions of the University to offer degree completion programs at various locations to persons unable to attend traditional day classes.

Mission and Guiding Principles

The Office of Adult and Graduate Studies supports the mission of Iowa Wesleyan University by providing access for adult learners; engagement between the University and Community; and empowerment of individuals through learning.

These principles and beliefs prioritize our actions.

  • We believe that everyone is a learner.
  • We offer service to learners through a welcoming attitude and by showing respect, integrity, sincerity, pride and effective problem- solving in a professional fashion.
  • We provide high quality and convenient learning opportunities.

General Requirements

Adult and Graduate Studies students pursuing Bachelor of Science degree meet the same requirements as are identified in other sections of this catalog. This includes but is not limited to University-wide course or proficiency requirements, course distribution requirements, credit hour requirements, and graduation requirements (including Internship and service learning). Requirements for the Bachelor of General Studies degree are found later in this section under "Adult Degree Completion Programs." Tuition and fees

are listed in the Financial Information section of this catalog.

The College's distinctive academic program includes three elements inherent in each student's education:

Life Skills--a curriculum-wide emphasis on the development of the following critical skills of communication, critical thinking, and civic engagement.

Service-Learning & Civic Engagement--a service learning program in which students deepen their learning through service to others.

Internship--the direct application of learning toward initiating, changing or enhancing one's career.

Service-Learning and Internship are required of all students and are described in this catalog under Experiential Learning.

Admission Policy and Procedures

Any adult student pursuing a degree through Iowa Wesleyan's Adult and Graduate Studies program must complete and submit to the AGS Office a short application form. Applicants must also submit copies of transcripts covering all work attempted or completed at each college or university previously attended. The form and transcripts should be submitted before or during the first 12 credit hours enrolled. Unofficial photocopies of transcripts are acceptable for initial evaluation purposes; official copies are required prior to formal admission to a degree program.

Applicants who have no previous college work will be required to provide high school transcripts. High school transcripts may be requested from transfer students. GED scores are acceptable.

Persons who are not pursuing a degree are not required to submit the application form or transcripts unless specifically requested to do so.

After an applicant's file is complete, official admission status will be conveyed to the applicant.

Adult and Graduate Studies students are classified as those students who are admitted through the Office of Adult and Graduate Studies and who are pursuing courses and/or degrees available through the evening or online Adult and Graduate Studies schedule. Such students will be eligible for any and all Federal/State grants and loans for which they qualify. Enrollment for students classified as Adult and Graduate Studies will be strictly based on the Adult and Graduate Studies per-credit hour tuition rate to a maximum of 9 credit hours during a given term* and will be eligible for any or all qualifying financial aid with the exception of Iowa Wesleyan University grants and scholarships. Adult and Graduate Studies students, who need to enroll in a course offered during the day, must be pre-approved by the Dean of Adult and Graduate Studies and the Academic Dean. Students desiring to change their classification must petition the Academic Dean and the Chief Business Officer for approval.

*Students may petition the Committee of Academic Standards to enroll in more than the maximum credits allowed in a given term and, if approved to do so, will be subject to a per-credit overload fee.

Any full-time day student who desires to switch to the evening program to seek a degree exclusively through the Adult and Graduate Studies program must be in good academic standing, and have the written approval of the Academic Dean and Chief Financial Officer. Transfer credit policies are listed in the Student Admission section of this catalog.

Course Registration Procedures

Preregistrations: Students are strongly encouraged to preregister for classes. Preregistration offers preference in classes open to limited enrollment. It also assists in forecasting enrollment to avoid cancellation of limited-size classes; and helps determine if an adequate number of texts and supplies have been ordered. It also assists the instructor in preparing course outlines and handout materials. Some scheduled courses have registration deadlines.

Registrations: Official registration is confirmed at the first class meeting. A registration for any class at the first day or any subsequent meeting is considered as an official registration and billings will be based on those registrations. Failure to attend class after the official registration has been confirmed will not cancel the obligation to pay for assessed tuition and text charges (See Changes of Registration, below).

Changes of Registration--Adult and Graduate

Studies Classes

Add/drops are permitted freely and at no charge during the normal add/drop periods as listed below. There will be no tuition charge for students who drop credit hours and no record of enrollment in a "dropped" course will appear on the transcript. All classes added or dropped after the term has begun must be properly requested through the Adult and Graduate Studies Office. Nonattendance of a class does not constitute a drop or withdrawal, and the student becomes liable for full or prorated tuition charges as noted below. Please note that a student who wishes to "drop" the only course in which they are enrolled during a term, may be considered as withdrawing from the College - see "Complete withdrawal from Iowa Wesleyan University" below.

Deadlines to Add a course

Face-to-face course: Prior to the start of the second class meeting IWU Online courses: Noon on the Wednesday following the opening of the class

Deadlines to Drop a course

Face-to-face courses: Noon of the day following the second class meeting IWU Online courses: Noon on the Friday following the opening of the course

Withdrawal from a class (reduction of a portion of a student's course load without a letter grade being posted) may take place during the time between the drop deadline and completion of 60% of the course length - after which a letter-grade for the course will be awarded. Consistent with all part-time students who withdraw from a portion of their credit load, 100 percent tuition will be charged after the normal add/drop period has expired; however those students affected will remain eligible for any financial aid awarded prior to the withdrawal. In such cases, the Registrar, the Financial Aid Office and the Business Office will be notified by the Adult and Graduate Studies Office upon notification by the student. A "W" will be recorded on the transcript.

Complete withdrawal from Iowa Wesleyan University reflects cases in which an Adult and Graduate Studies student has withdrawn from all credit hours for which they were registered in a given term beyond the add/drop period. In such cases, Federal guidelines stipulate that tuition be refunded according to the formulas published elsewhere in this Catalog. Withdrawal from Iowa Wesleyan University is not permitted within the final seven days of an 8-week term.

A change from letter grade to audit or S/U must be requested prior to the third class meeting of a face-to-face course (or prior to the completion of 25% of the course length in online courses or courses not following a regular term schedule). Normally, tuition charges are not recalculated in these cases.

A change from audit or S/U to a letter grade must be requested prior to the sixth class meeting of a face-to-face course (or prior to completion of 50% of the course length in online courses or courses not following a regular term schedule. When an Adult and Graduate Studies student changes from an audit to a letter grade, tuition is normally recalculated to reflect the change in credit hour status.

Special Note regarding Changes of Registration

For classes/programs not following the normal 8-week Adult and Graduate Studies term (e.g. weekend courses, full semester courses, directed studies), deadlines and appropriate charges will be calculated as they correlate to the 8-week time frame, or as determined by a host school in cases where IWU students have enrolled for IWU credit.

Financial Aid

Adult and Graduate Studies students may be eligible to receive financial assistance through the Federal Pell Grant, Iowa Tuition Grant and student loans. Students interested in obtaining a loan will need to be enrolled at least half-time. For more information, contact the Financial Aid Office, toll free, 800.582.2383 or 319.385.6242 or financialaid@IW.edu.

Cooperative Agreements with Community Colleges Iowa Wesleyan University cooperates with area community colleges in providing convenient education at the bachelor's degree level to the citizens of southeastern Iowa. Select degree completion programs are offered with classes online and in the evening on various campuses. Contact the Adult and Graduate Studies Office for a list of majors, courses and locations. Other reciprocal agreements exist regarding the exchange of courses, credit hours and services. Programs have been developed in which a student may complete an AA or AS degree at the community college, complete the Bachelor's degree through Iowa Wesleyan University and then earn a Masters degree by attending evening classes offered by area universities. Contact the Office of Adult and Graduate Studies for more information.

Southeastern Community College and Iowa Wesleyan University have entered into two special cooperative programs to serve the needs of learners in Southeast Iowa. Students who have completed an A.A. degree at SCC with a focus in Chemical Dependency Counseling, can transfer that program in special articulation with Iowa Wesleyan University's Human Services major to earn a Bachelor's degree.

Southeastern Community College students who have completed an A.A., A.S., or A.A.S. degree with prescribed coursework in Industrial Technology are able to transfer to Iowa Wesleyan and use that coursework toward meeting the State of Iowa Department of Education Teaching Endorsement (#14.141-11) in Industrial Technology for grades 7-12. Please seek additional information from the Iowa Wesleyan University Teacher Education program.

Contact the Iowa Wesleyan University Office of Adult and Graduate Studies for details about cooperative programs.

Credit for Life Learning

Iowa Wesleyan University recognizes that college level learning can and does take place outside of the collegiate setting. The University also recognizes that not every experience produces college level learning. Therefore, Iowa Wesleyan University has established a process to determine if college level learning has indeed occurred and the amount of academic credit appropriate for that learning.

Often, other methods of assessing and awarding college credit are satisfactory to the student and to the University. Thus established credit awarding processes (e.g. CLEP subject exams, American Council on Education evaluations of armed services experiences, college credit recommendations of non-collegiate sponsored instruction and the University's credit by examination process) must be explored before making use of the Credit for Life Learning assessment process.

Assuming the established credit awarding processes are not applicable, the student may submit a credit request based on a critical self examination of "what learning has occurred" as reflected in a written portfolio document. Credit awarded can be course specific or in a more general context, especially if the credit is outside the major the student is pursuing.

Please contact the Office of Adult and Graduate Studies for guidelines, and/ or a pre-assessment form.

Adult and Graduate Studies Degree Completion Programs

Bachelor of Science Degree Programs Business Administration

See details under the Business Administration section of this Catalog

Bachelor of Science in Nursing Online Degree Completion Program RN to BSN Online Undergraduate Certificate Programs

RN's Only. See details under the Nursing section of this Catalog.

Human Services

See details under the Science Division section of this Catalog.

Post Bachelor's Certificate

Online Strategic Leadership Certificate - 15 credit hour online certificate

Activities Available to Adult and Graduate Studies Students

Since evening Adult and Graduate Studies students have limited access to advisors and standard services normally available to students attending day programs on campus, the tuition rate is set lower for AGS students. However, AGS students are admitted to most activities offered on the Iowa Wesleyan University campus without cost. This includes most athletic,

musical, recreational/entertainment and cultural events. Admission fees are required for certain activities, and AGS students must pay for any activity requiring payment from other Iowa Wesleyan University students. AGS student identification must be shown for free entry. Free admission for AGS students is not transferable to family members or friends.

Academic Advising and Services for Adult and Graduate Studies Students

The Office of Adult and Graduate Studies freely provides information and counseling for prospective, new and current students. Students may make appointments for individual advising at each program location.

Once a student is accepted as a degree candidate, an academic advisor may be assigned who has experience in the appropriate major. The Office of Adult and Graduate Studies will continue to provide academic advising to all AGS students.

All Iowa Wesleyan students, whether enrolled in on-campus, online or extended campus courses, are encouraged to make full use of on-campus services and technology resources. Parking stickers are not required for several lots on campus, but any AGS student desiring a sticker for a restricted lot may receive one free of charge by contacting the Physical Plant Office.

The entire Iowa Wesleyan University campus is "wi-fi" enabled, with access permitted via an IW Username/Password.

The John Wesley Holland Student Union includes the Student Life Office, the College Bookstore and a snack bar where students gather. There is also a lounge for students in Room 210 of the Science Hall.

The J. Raymond Chadwick Library provides research information and assistance, interlibrary loan services, computer lab, and a comfortable, quiet place to study. The OASIS is located on the top floor of Chadwick Library. The OASIS helps students strengthen specific skills--such as reading or note-taking--and coordinates a tutoring program. Adult and Graduate Studies students are invited to utilize its services. Evening appointments can be arranged by calling 319.385.6334. The Career Development Office is located on the top floor of the Student Union.

The Student Union houses the Office of Service-Learning & Civic Engagement, the Internship Office.

The Howe Student Activity Center contains three conference rooms, a technology-intensive classroom, a walking/jogging track and fitness room, in addition to indoor athletics facilities.

Administrative offices located in the P.E.O. Memorial Building include the Registrar, the Academic Dean, and the President. The Office of Adult and Graduate Studies is on the main floor of the building.

Students will find the offices of Business Affairs, Student Accounts and Financial Aid in the ground level of the Chapel Auditorium.

Online Services for Adult and Graduate Studies Students

The Iowa Wesleyan University website is the portal for access to a number of online services offered free of charge. You may apply online from that site; download a copy of this Catalog; and keep up with the latest IWU news and announcements. By going to www.IW.edu/ags and selecting specific services from the menu and icons, admitted and enrolled students can register for a username/password, secure an email account, register

for classes, purchase textbooks, complete online courses, enter IWU's online library resources, subscribe to Night Tracks (evening/online student newsletter) and access late breaking information through the AGS Bulletin Board - all at no cost to our enrolled adult students.

Honors Recognition for Adult and Graduate Studies Students

Honors recognition for Adult and Graduate Studies students is issued at the end of each academic year. In order to qualify for this honor, students must be classified as an Iowa Wesleyan University Adult and Graduate Studies student, while accumulating at least 15 semester hours of course work completed through a full academic year and must maintain a cumulative grade point average of 3.50 or better.

Adult and Graduate Studies students carrying 12 credit hours or more during any given academic semester are eligible for Honors Recognition via the Dean's List.

Withdrawal from University and Refunds of Credit Balances

Please refer to the following Drop/Withdrawal scenarios concerning Federal State Financial Aid policies.

Federal/State Policies Concerning Changes of Registration

A student who withdraws from all courses in an "A term" but who intends on returning for courses in the "B term" must provide in writing at the time of their withdrawal, a statement of intent to enroll for that "B Term." If notification is not received, complete withdrawal adjustments may be made to their financial aid.

Calculation scenarios and formulas:

  • If a student is enrolled in either A or B only: Tuition and financial aid is calculated by dividing the days attended by the total days in the term (up to a maximum of 60% of the term).

  • If a student is enrolled in A and B and drops B registrations prior to the end of A: Tuition and financial aid is recalculated for number of remaining credits enrolled.

  • If a student is enrolled in Session A and B and drops B registration between sessions: Tuition and financial aid is calculated by dividing the total days in A & B by the days attended in A to calculate the percentage completed; tuition will not be charged for the B courses dropped.

  • If a student in enrolled in A & B and drops B courses during the B drop period: Tuition and financial aid is calculated by dividing the the total days in A & B by the total days attended in A & B to calculate the percentage completed; tuition will not be charged for the B courses dropped.

  • If a student is enrolled in A & B and withdraws from courses during B: Tuition and financial aid is calculated by dividing the total days in A & B by the days attended in A & B to calculate the percentage completed. Full tuition and aid will remain in place if the withdrawal occurs beyond 60% of the B term.

Textbooks for Courses

Iowa Wesleyan University employs the services of MBS Direct, a major textbook supply and distribution service, to handle textbook acquisition services for ALL STUDENTS AND COURSES offered through the College. Online ordering is handled by going through the IWU webpage at www.IW.edu, clicking on the #BEBOLD link and selecting "Bookstore." The MBS Direct network of publishers and wholesalers offers textbooks through a variety of formats: new and used textbooks, textbook rental, eBooks/ eRentals and guaranteed buyback at prices offered during initial purchase. Students may choose from a variety of payment and shipping options. MBS ships all book orders "out the door in 24" and is located in Columbia, MO.

Student Development

Housing and Residential Requirements

Iowa Wesleyan University is firmly committed to the philosophy and practice

of a residential college. We believe that the opportunity to live and study

in community is a primary and essential element of such a philosophy. The University stresses a campus living environment of civility and respect that fosters student learning and success. To this end, all full-time unmarried students who do not live with parents at their primary residence within

30 miles of campus are required to live in college residential facilities. Exceptions to this rule may be made for students 23 years of age and older on the first day of classes in August, students living with dependent children, and military veterans with at least two years of active military service.

International Student Residential Requirement

The experience of spending a semester or more in the United States is significantly enhanced by a full immersion in the campus experience. Therefore, it is IWU policy that all international students will live in our residence halls, where they will interact with American students and participate in many college activities, exposing them to the breadth of American culture and life. International students will be expected to live in the residence halls for their entire enrollment at IW.

Residence Halls and Suites

Students are housed in University residence halls and suites. McKibbin houses men, Sheaffer-Trieschmann houses women, and Nemitz is co-ed. Roommates are assigned without discrimination as to race, creed, sexual orientation or national origin. Each student is furnished a bed, dresser, study desk, chair and closet space.

Specially trained students serve as Resident Advisors who live on each floor of the residence halls and assist students, and help maintain a safe and comfortable living environment.

Food Service

All residential students at Iowa Wesleyan University participate in the college dining service board program offered at the dining hall in the Student Union. Food service staff attempts to meet special dietary restrictions. Special dietary arrangement may be made with the general manager if prescribed by a physician.

Residence hall students are enrolled in the Marquis meal plan. This plan is designed as a continuous dining option for students. Students can use multiple meal swipes per day upon entry into the dining hall during service hours. The menu variety changes with the main meal periods throughout the day with options being available Monday - Friday from 7:30 a.m. - 7 p.m., and on the weekends from 11 a.m. - 6:30 p.m. While multiple meal swipes are available to each student every day, meal plan swipes must be used by the student listed on the plan, are not transferrable and expire at the end of each semester.

Commuter students, and Faculty/Staff have the option of selecting the 50 block meal plan. This plan includes $50 additional munch money that can be used for selected retail items available in the dining hall. The 50 block plan costs $300 per semester. Any remaining amount in the munch money only can be transferred from the fall to the spring semester. The staff at Sodexo can assist you with questions you may have with this plan.

Health Care

Iowa Wesleyan University works with community health care providers to ensure students have access to the best possible medical care in our area. For emergencies or after-hours care, the Henry County Health Center emergency room is staffed at all times. Students should be aware that visits to the emergency department are the responsibility of the student. All students are to have medical history, including immunization documentation and insurance information on file in the Office of Student Development. The immunization information MUST be received by the college prior to a student moving into the residence halls.

Insurance

The University encourages students to carry adequate health insurance protection since students are responsible for all health care costs incurred while a student at the University. All students participating in intercollegiate athletics are covered for athletic- related injuries by an excess health insurance policy and by a catastrophic athletic injury policy. Coverage by the catastrophic plan begins once a student's total medical costs related to the athletic injury reach $25,000.

Immunization

All students living on campus must provide documentation from a physician of the following prior to moving into the residence halls:

  1. Proof and date of having had measles, mumps and rubella, or

  1. Documentation of two doses immunization for MMR after 1980, or

  1. Written recommendation of their doctor that they should not receive MMR immunization at this time.

Students unable to comply with one of the above (and born after 1956) must be re-immunized at the student's expense. The University further requires documentation of a tuberculosis skin test (Mantoux) within a year prior to arriving on campus and verification of follow-up treatment as necessary.

Student Conduct and Behavior

The University is a community of scholars in which the ideals of freedom of inquiry, freedom of thought, freedom of expression, and freedom of the individual are upheld and sustained. However, the exercise and preservation of these freedoms and rights require a respect for the rights of all in the community to enjoy them to the same extent. It is clear that in a community of learning, willful disruption of the educational process, destruction of property, and interference with the orderly process of the College or with the rights of other members of the College community cannot be tolerated. Students enrolling in the College assume an obligation to conduct themselves in a manner compatible with the College's function as an educational institution. To fulfill its functions of imparting and gaining knowledge, the College retains the power to maintain order within the College community and to exclude those who are disruptive of the educational process.

College is an experience in community living. As with any community, certain rules are developed for the protection and comfort of all. Iowa Wesleyan has a minimal number of regulations and asks for cooperation in complying with them. Specific regulations of the College, its customs, and its traditions are contained in the Student Handbookdistributed each fall. All students are responsible for reading and observing the rules and regulations contained in the Student Handbook.

Iowa Wesleyan University is required to keep a log of substantive complaints for the North Central Association of Colleges and Schools in keeping with Federal regulations. A complaint for purposes of this policy is defined as a written, dated, signed statement from a student submitted to the Chief Executive Officer, Vice President for Academic Affairs or the Vice President and Dean for Student Development. The log will include information about the disposition of the complaints and a summary log will be available for the North Central Association comprehensive evaluation team for review.

Counseling Services Personal Counseling

Counseling assistance is available to assist students with a variety of issues that might hinder personal and academic success. These issues include help in adjusting from being away from home, financial difficulties, roommate conflicts, relationship problems, depression, or any number of other personal

issues. A part-time professional counselor is available to students at no charge

on campus in a confidential setting.

Career Counseling

One of the hardest questions a person has to answer is 'What do I want to be when I grow up'? The Office of Career Development & Internships at Iowa Wesleyan University can assist students in answering that question. From the first campus visit to graduation day, students can receive assistance in deciding on a major, exploring careers, designing a resume, preparing for that first professional job interview and planning for graduate school. A number of free resources are available through the office to assist students with planning their future while attending Iowa Wesleyan University.

Academic Advising

Each student is assigned an academic advisor to help design an individually tailored academic program. Students should be sure to consult their advisors before making changes in class schedules. This advisor is also available to discuss any areas of concern.

Office of Career Development & Internships

The Office of Career Development & Internships assists students throughout their college experience in assessing personal interests, exploring careers within a chosen major, developing job search skills and materials and exploring graduate school and employment opportunities.

A trained career counselor will guide and support students as they prepare for the transition from college to career. One-on-one assistance is available to assist students with assessing career interests, resume and cover letter writing, job searching skills, interview preparation, utilizing online resources, networking and graduate school applications. Free handouts are available on a variety of topics. Programs on dining etiquette and networking with professionals are also held throughout the year. Individual appointments may be scheduled at the office for one-on-one support and guidance through the self-assessment and job search process.

A career resource library is available within the center for students to access career and job-related information. Free materials on careers, job search tools, interview preparation and graduate school are also available for students.

Iowa Wesleyan Office of Career Development & Internships is a member of the Iowa College Recruiting Network (ICoRN) whose mission is to enhance career opportunities for students by providing innovative and efficient services that connect students with employers. Membership with the network allows students at Iowa Wesleyan University to participate in events such as Career Fairs and Interview Days. These events are selective and sponsored through joint efforts of career services offices at independent colleges and universities throughout Iowa.

For more information on the office and services provided, contact the director at 319-385-6375 or visit the office on the second floor of the Holland Student Union Hours are 8:00 AM to 5:00 PM, Monday through Friday. Information can also be accessed on the Iowa Wesleyan University website.

Intercollegiate Athletics

Iowa Wesleyan's program of intercollegiate athletics is organized and conducted as an integral part of the educational program. The University is transitioning its national affiliation to the NCAA (National Collegiate Athletic Association) Division III and is a provisional member of the SLIAC (St.

Louis Intercollegiate Athletic Association) and the UMAC (Upper Midwest Athletic Conference) for football. Iowa Wesleyan offers intercollegiate teams for women in basketball, golf, soccer, softball, and volleyball. Iowa Wesleyan offers intercollegiate teams for men in baseball, basketball, football, golf

and soccer. All students, regardless of major, who might be interested in participating in these sports are encouraged to become involved.

Every precaution is exercised to prevent injuries, however, the University encourages all students to carry appropriate insurance. Injuries that may occur either while training for or engaging in an athletic activity are covered by an excess (secondary) insurance, meaning that student must first file the claim on his/her primary insurance carrier and then submit the claim to the secondary carrier. Catastrophic coverage is also provided for athletic injuries above $25,000.

Athletics

Athletics Mission/Philosophy Statement

Iowa Wesleyan University is committed to providing a program of intercollegiate athletics that is student-centered. The College believes that the primary function of intercollegiate athletics at a small church-related, liberal arts college is one of a high quality co-curricular complement to its overall mission. As such, academics have priority over athletic or other co-curricular pursuits.

Iowa Wesleyan athletics is founded on a student-first philosophy. Those who participate in intercollegiate athletics are expected to apply themselves in the classroom, meet all academic requirements and make steady progress toward graduation.

Iowa Wesleyan University athletes understand the balance of priorities between academics and co-curricular programs, whether the latter are athletics, the performing arts, or other student activities. Iowa Wesleyan University coaches understand this balance of priorities, and seek to recruit students who will be successful student-athletes.

Intercollegiate athletics at Iowa Wesleyan University is a powerful learning experience for the development of excellence, goal directed behavior, appreciating one's role within a larger group, overcoming adversity, time management, and prioritization of competing values. Iowa Wesleyan is committed to providing the best leadership, support services, and competitive environment that its resources will allow to ensure a quality intercollegiate athletic experience for all student-athletes.

The Universityi is committed to instilling and developing the values of superlative ethical conduct and fair play among its athletes, coaches and student spectators. Furthermore, Iowa Wesleyan University recognizes that student- athletes are role models to their peers as well as representatives of the University, and the University actively expects student-athletes to conduct themselves in a manner which befits those roles.

Iowa Wesleyan University is committed to gender equity and values cultural diversity. It strives to ensure that all individuals and all teams are treated with the same level of fairness, resources, and respect so that all athletes are afforded an equal opportunity to develop their full potential on and off the playing field.

Dramatics

Students have the opportunity to participate in drama productions of the Mount Pleasant Community Theatre Association. The participation may be either through auditioning for an acting role or by working in some backstage capacity with lighting, sound, props, costumes, set construction, makeup or publicity. Some productions are held on the campus and students are admitted free of charge.

Campus Religious Life

Iowa Wesleyan University is a faith based institution that has been affiliated with the United Methodist Church since 1849. Our Christian and Wesleyan heritage understands success as the holistic incorporation of calls us to promote of spiritual growth as well as intellectual development. Iowa Wesleyan University provides opportunities for worship, spiritual development, counseling, fellowship and mission. We encourage every student to join a nearby church or religious organization and take part in religious life programs on and off campus. The university Chaplain is an ordained pastor of the has a part time United Methodist Church chaplain who fosters spiritual development and growth and fellowship among students of all faiths and religious backgrounds.

Student Organizations and Activities Membership Qualifications for Organizations

Student organizations at Iowa Wesleyan University offer a variety of involvement opportunities. Groups focus on special interests, professional organizations, religious groups and so much more! Students can explore new interests or feed their passion in the existing organizations. If there is not something you like then form a new organization.

Individual organizations and/or activities may establish minimum standards for eligibility (for example, minimum grade point average.) All organizations are expected to use non-discrimination selection practices, including those based on race, creed or national origin.)

Cheerleading

The purpose of cheerleading is to promote, create and uphold team spirit, pride and loyalty, develop good sportsmanship and relations in the community between teams and squads during events. Currently the IW Cheer Squad is considered a student organization, meaning it is not considered a competition squad. Try outs will be held at the beginning of each school year. For more information contact the Office of Student Development.

Student Organizations

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Dance Team - Purple Chaos

As a member of Purple Chaos they perform at home athletic games by using a variety of styles of dance.

Fellowship of Christian Athletes (FCA)

FCA encourages, supports, and inspires students in their Christian faith and to honor and glorify God. All students are welcome to attend, one does not have to be an athlete to participate.

Greek Life

ALPHA XI DELTA SORORITY

Alpha Xi Delta is a national sorority whose vision is "Inspiriting women to realize their potential." Therefore, they dedicate themselves to helping members maximize their own strengths and talents while offering a sisterhood that is meaningful, genuine and fun.

PI DELTA CHI

Pi Delta Chi is a local sorority whose focus is to promote sisterhood, to mature and progress into sophisticated and well-rounded women, to cultivate leadership, to contribute service within our community.

THETA SIGMA RHO

Theta Sigma Rho is a local sorority founded by Iowa Wesleyan University Women. This is a great opportunity to grow sisterhood and develop Greek life at Iowa Wesleyan University.

ZETA PSI MU

Zeta Psi Mu is a local fraternity founded by Iowa Wesleyan University men and focuses around four core values, Responsibility, Honesty, Hard work, and Community.

Habitat for Humanity

The Iowa Wesleyan chapter of Habitat for Humanity is a partner in the nonprofit Christian housing ministry of Habitat for Humanity International, whose goal is to eliminate poverty housing from the world. All students, faculty and staff are welcome to join us as we: build or rehabilitate local houses with the Henry County Habitat for Humanity; raise money for materials and program support; educate the college and community about affordable housing issues; advocate for those who need affordable housing.

Homecoming Committee

The purpose of this group is to plan and execute activities that capture the traditions of homecoming at Iowa Wesleyan University.

Honorary Societies

Upon invitation, honorary societies are open to students with outstanding academic records. Each honorary society has its own academic requirements for membership. The following honor societies have chapters on the Iowa Wesleyan University campus:

Beta Beta Beta

A national biological honorary society for students and biology majors of high scholastic standing, dedicated to improving the understanding and appreciation of biological study.

Sigma Tau Delta

Advances the study of the chief literary masterpieces, encourages worthwhile reading, promotes the mastery of written expression, and fosters a spirit of fellowship among students specializing in the English language and literature ever keeping in mind our international motto: Sincerity, Truth, Design.

Multi-cultural Awareness Organization (MAO)

The purpose of this organization is to encourage the IW student body to succeed academically and socially, in an effort to promote character, diversity, social events, and community involvement around campus.

Orientation Crew

The purpose of this group is to welcome new student and their guests to Iowa Wesleyan University during summer and fall New Student Orientation.

Professional Organizations

A wide variety of organizations make it possible for every student to find friends and activities to fit his/her own interest and aptitudes. These are:

  • American and Iowa Choral Directors Association--for students interested in choral music.
  • Behavioral Science Club--open to Psychology, Human Services, and Criminal Justice majors and others with an interest in society and its workings.
  • NAfME-National Association for Music Educators - open to any student interested in music education.
  • Student Nursing Association--open to students enrolled in the nursing program or interested in healthcare.
  • Real†Talk - Student Bible Study--Students who come together to read and discuss God's word and support each other. Bible Study takes place on Tuesday at 8pm.

Student Athlete Advisory Committee (SAAC)

The purpose of SAAC is to generate a student-athlete voice within the institution and conference; to review and respond to proposed NCAA legislation; to actively promote Iowa Wesleyan University athletics; to promote a positive student-athlete image; to increase fan support at athletic contests; and to support the campus and conference community through community outreach efforts, with a primary focus on the NCAA Division III SAAC and Special Olympics partnership.

Students Today Alumni Forever (S.T.A.F.)

The association made up of current students acts as an extension of the Alumni Office to create awareness of students and alumni activities on and off campus, thereby strengthening the relationship between the college, its alumni, and the community.

Student Ambassadors

The IWU Ambassadors assist Admissions by welcoming prospective students and parents to campus.

Student Government Association (SGA)

The purpose of the Student Government is to coordinate the interests and activities of the student body and share in the responsibilities of college governance as it directly affects student life.

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Student Union Board (SUB)

The Student Union Board promotes student activities on campus, igniting your social life! SUB brings a wide variety of performers to campus such as musicians, magicians, hypnotists, speakers, comedians and much more. The group coordinates events like Bingo, Wesleyan's Got Talent, $2 Movies, Casino Nights and the list goes on.

Tiger Fit

Tiger Fit presents beginner to advanced, individual and small group, aggressive and competitive cross training fitness sessions. Tiger Fit is for those who wish to enhance more challenging fitness goals. Tiger Fit begins with body and weight training with a focus on technique.

Student Admission

The criteria for admission are used to identify those who are most likely to complete a college program of study. The Office of Admissions evaluates each candidate for admission on an individual basis and acceptance decisions are based on the student's high school grade point average, class rank and the results of the ACT (American College Testing Program) or SAT I (Scholastic Assessment Test of the College Board). These criteria pertain to a first year applicants only--transfer student admissions criteria are located below.

A first year applicant is required to submit an official transcript from their high school, or a high school equivalency certificate based on the GED tests. Final official transcripts should be submitted to the University prior to the first day of classes. Should the University not receive your final official transcripts at the end of the drop/add period, you are subject to dismissal from the college. The high school transcript should include four years of English, three years of mathematics, three years of social science and two years of science (both should be a laboratory science). Although foreign language is not required for admission, a foreign language may be required to graduate from Iowa Wesleyan University.

A first year applicant who has taken college courses for credit is required to provide Iowa Wesleyan with official transcripts from each college attended.

Iowa Wesleyan processes all applications on a rolling basis (including transfers). An application is considered complete when all academic credentials--including the high school and/or college transcript(s) and results of the ACT or SAT I--have been received. Notification is sent to each candidate for admission within two weeks after submitting the required academic information.

Campus Visits

Students and families exploring college options are invited to visit the campus of Iowa Wesleyan University. Individual appointments can be scheduled by contacting the Office of Admissions at 1-800-582-2383 or by e-mail at campusvisits@IW.edu. Campus visits can be scheduled Monday through Friday 9 a.m.-3 p.m. Visits can also be arranged on Saturday mornings from 9 a.m.-Noon.

Iowa Wesleyan University offers several open house events throughout the year. Contact the Office of Admissions or visit www.IW.edu/visit for additional information.

First Year Student Admission

Full Admission

A first year applicant must meet the following criteria to be considered for full

admission to Iowa Wesleyan University:

  • have a composite score of 19 or above on the ACT or a score of 890 or above on the SAT,
  • have a cumulative grade point average of 2.5 or above (on a 4.0 scale).

Conditional Admission

Applicants may be admitted on a conditional basis, subject to review of their performance after one semester at Iowa Wesleyan University, if they meet the following two requirements:

  • have a composite score of 17-18 on the ACT or a score of 750-880 on the SAT,
  • have a cumulative grade point average of 2.0 or above (on a 4.0 scale)

Committee Admission

Applicants not meeting the minimum criteria may petition the Admissions Advisory Committee for committee admission. Additional information, including teacher recommendations, a personal statement or interview, may be required as part of this process. More information on this process is available from the Office of Admissions.

First Year Application Procedure

A first year applicant to Iowa Wesleyan must submit the following materials to the Office of Admissions in order to be considered for admission:

  • a completed application for admission form available online or paper copy
  • an official high school transcript--which must include both the student's rank in class where available and cumulative grade point average--or GED certification
  • official results of either the ACT or SAT I

Home Schooled Students

Students who are home schooled seeking admission to Iowa Wesleyan University must submit appropriate documentation of high school or college- level coursework completed. This coursework must be equivalent of a high school diploma. Home schooled students must also submit official results of either the ACT or SAT I exams.

Transfer Admission

Candidates for transfer admission (having 10 or more semester hours of college, excluding credits earned via IWU dual-enrollment) must meet the following guidelines to be considered for admission to Iowa Wesleyan:

  • have a cumulative grade point average of 2.0 (on a 4.0 scale) or better from all previous college work,
  • have a 2.0 cumulative grade point average in all major and general education courses; activity courses taken as electives, such as choir or weight-lifting, are not to be included in the g.p.a. calculation, and
  • be in good standing from the previous institution attended.

Also taken into consideration when determining if a transfer student is granted full admission, conditional admission or is required to go before the Admissions Advisory Committee for admission, is the student's past performance in college core courses and major courses, as well as the overall difficulty of the courses previously taken.

A transfer student who is not granted full or conditional admission may petition the Admissions Advisory Committee for committee admission. Additional information, including faculty recommendations and a personal statement or interview, may be required as part of this process. More information on this process is available from the Office of Admissions.

Transfer Application Procedure

  1. Complete and submit the application for admission available online or paper copy.
  1. Request that official transcripts from ALL colleges attended be sent to the Office of Admissions, even if all prior coursework is listed on the transcript of the college last attended. Final official transcripts should be submitted to the University prior to the first day of classes. Should the University not receive your final official transcripts at the end of the drop/add period, you are subject to dismissal from the University.
  1. An official copy of the student's high school transcripts should also be sent to the Office of Admissions, unless the student has 24 or more semester hours of previous college credit.
  • Transcripts that have been in the student's possession will not be considered official documents, unless they remain sealed.
  • Iowa Wesleyan reserves the right to request an official copy of the student's high school transcripts, even if they have the required 24 semester hours of previous college credit.

Transfer Credit

Generally, a course taken at a regionally accredited college or university, in which the content and depth is similar to a course taught at Iowa Wesleyan, will be accepted for transfer.

Grades earned in courses accepted for transfer will not be entered on the student's Iowa Wesleyan transcript and will not be utilized in the computation of a student's cumulative grade point average earned at Iowa Wesleyan University. The College will accept, within the first 64 semester hours, course credits in which the student has obtained "D" grades as elective credit only if the student has a 2.0 grade point average from the previous college(s).

Iowa Wesleyan University will accept up to 64 semester hours of college credit for students transferring from community colleges. The University will also accept up to 94 semester hours of college credit from four-year colleges or from a combination of community colleges and four-year colleges, respectively. Either way, the student must complete the final 30 semester hours (a minimum of 15 semester hours of this must be taken in the student's major field of study) of the College's 124 semester-hour degree requirement at Iowa Wesleyan.

Courses in which the student has earned a grade below "C-" may not satisfy all College or major requirements. Additionally,

  • An Associate of Arts or Associate of Science degree will fulfill the Iowa Wesleyan University-wide Wesleyan Studies course requirements, as well as confer junior status upon the student; however, a student with such a degree who has not earned the equivalent of a grade of C or higher in a second-semester composition course must fulfill this requirement as determined by review of application materials and/or a placement test. Additionally, any course taken as a result of such review will fulfill the requirement only if it includes a significant research component. Wesleyan Studies Global Awareness course WS 300 Global Issues course and the all-University requirements of Safety and Survival, Internship, Service Learning hours (tiered), and Writing Intensive courses (tiered) are not satisfied by an Associate of Arts (A.A.) or an Associate of Science (A.S.) degree.
  • Students who have not earned an A.A. or an A.S. degree will earn credit for ENG105 and ENG201 only if the course(s) offered as equivalent(s) have a significant research component and the student has earned a grade of at least C in the course(s) offered as equivalent.
  • Generally, an Associate of Applied Science degree will also confer up to a maximum of 60 semester hours (junior status) upon the student, although credits from it may not satisfy Iowa Wesleyan's general education requirements, and some particular courses may not be accepted toward the major or satisfy all-university requirements.
  • Students who have successfully completed one-year programs at approved technical and business institutes will be accorded up to a maximum of 30 semester hours (sophomore-level standing), although credits from it may not satisfy Iowa Wesleyan's general education requirements, and some particular courses may not be accepted toward the major or satisfy all-university requirements.

The Office of the Registrar is ultimately responsible for the evaluation of all transfer credit. Transfer students will receive a transcript evaluation upon their acceptance into Iowa Wesleyan. Transfer credit evaluations will not reflect courses in progress. Due to articulation agreements, nursing student credit transfer may be handled in a different manner. The credits of transfer students accepted from a non-accredited institution will be evaluated by the Registrar following successful completion of the initial semester at Iowa Wesleyan University with a 2.0 grade point average.

PLEASE NOTE: Inaccurate or misleading information provided on the application for admission to the University constitutes grounds for dismissal. A recommendation from the high school counselor and/or principal may be requested.

Non-native English speakers may be required to demonstrate sufficient command of English through testing.

Advanced Standing / Additional Degrees

Students who seek to earn an additional degree at Iowa Wesleyan University after receiving a Bachelor's degree at IWU or another institution will be treated as seniors for financial aid purposes. Such students must meet the following requirements to receive a degree from IWU:

  • Residency Requirement - last 30 semester hours at IWU
  • Safety/Survival Requirement - listed under general graduation requirements
  • Service Learning Requirement - successfully complete one (1) course with a service learning component
  • Writing Intensive Requirement - successfully complete one (1) course listed as writing intensive
  • Major Courses - successfully complete all required courses for major

Enrollment Deposit

Residential students accepting their offer of admission to Iowa Wesleyan University should submit their $150 enrollment deposit. Transfer students are required to submit $100. This amount is applied toward the first semester's tuition. The enrollment deposit must be paid prior to course registration. Students wishing a refund of their enrollment deposit should submit a written request to the Office of Admissions by May 1 for fall semester and December 1 for spring semester.

Early Admission

An early admission program is available for outstanding high school students at the end of their junior year. All early admission candidates must request a letter of recommendation from the high school principal. Students interested in early admission should write to the Dean of Admissions.

Dual Enrollment Program with Southeastern Community College

This program permits students at either College to enroll in limited course work through the other institution for a standard tuition fee. Under this agreement, a valid and current student identification card from either Iowa Wesleyan or Southeastern Community College will be treated reciprocally as each institution's own with regard to library use, computer labs and attendance at institutionally-sponsored events on a space available basis.

College Credit for High School Students

Iowa Wesleyan University encourages above-average high school students to enroll in college courses. Work in this program is given full college credit at Iowa Wesleyan if the student later attends as a degree candidate. Acceptance into this program does not guarantee admission to the University as a degree candidate. See section on Financial Information in this Catalog for special tuition rates accorded to qualifying high school students. (page 233, 3c)

Readmission

Former students (not in attendance for one or more semesters) in good academic standing at the time of their departure from the University should write the Vice President for Academic Affairs to request readmission. An official transcript of any additional work from another accredited college or university should be forwarded at least one month prior to the registration day for the next term.

Former Iowa Wesleyan University students (not in attendance for one or more semesters) who were not considered to be in good academic standing must petition for readmission from the Committee on Academic Standards. This request must be received by the Vice President for Academic Affairs.

Students returning more than ten years from the date of their departure must follow the catalog current at the time of readmission. An exception to this limit is available to students who have completed all requirements for graduation except RSI. Any such individual may complete his or her degree by taking WS320, Leadership and Service, and any additional electives that may be needed to complete the 124 hour graduation requirement. Inquiry may be made through the office of the Vice President for Academic Affairs.

International Application Procedures

Iowa Wesleyan University welcomes students from around the world. The University seeks to achieve a diverse student population that will provide a global education for both American and international students. International students must complete the International Application for Undergraduate Admission.

Each student should submit official high school or college transcripts translated into English and a TOEFL score report. An English-speaking student may submit an ACT or SAT in place of the TOEFL. In order to be considered for admission, an international student must show English proficiency with a minimum score of 500 on the TOEFL, or have completed level 112 from any English Language Service center. The EIKEN STEP test is also permitted in place of the TOEFL for students from Japan. Other examinations such as the CET may be accepted at the discretion of the Dean of Admissions. International students may be accepted without examination by special agreement with their home institutions. Such agreements are generally made by the President of the University.

Residents of the United States, its territories, dominions and possessions who are not native speakers of English are also required to demonstrate English proficiency through either the TOEFL Examination or the ELS Level 112. Upon notification of acceptance, a student must complete a Certification of Finance form and return it to the Office of Admissions. This form will enable the University to determine the amount of financial aid it can award. A $100 enrollment deposit is required before Iowa Wesleyan University will issue an I-20.

Servicemember's Opportunity College

Iowa Wesleyan University is an active member of the Servicemember's Opportunity College (SOC) program. The Concurrent Admissions Program (ConAP) is a joint program of the Army Recruiting Command and participating colleges.

Financial Information

Tuition and Other Charges - Academic Year 2015-2016

(all charges are subject to change)

After Admission

Enrollment deposit payable upon acceptance to college - residential students

$150

Enrollment deposit payable upon acceptance to college - commuter students

$100

Tuition

Full-time

a) Fall or Spring semester, excluding Adult and Graduate Studies: 12-18 credit hours

b) Extra hours above 18 during Fall and Spring, per credit hour

$13,403

$675

Part-time

a) Fall and Spring Semesters up through 11, per credit hour

$675

Adult and Graduate Studies

a) Undergraduate, per credit hour per term

b) Graduate, per credit hour per term

c) Extra hours above 9 during any AGS term

d) Age 55+ and qualifying high school students, per credit hour per term

e) Arranged short courses may be individually structured and charged

$440

$350

$675

$210

Independent, Directed Study course work: per credit hour

$675

Summer Sessions: per credit hour (age 55+ is ½ tuition)

$440

Audit

a) Fall and Spring semesters, per listed credit hour

b) Adult and Graduate Studies Students, per listed credit hour

c) Individuals aged 65 and older may enroll in up to two courses per term as an audit (pending space available) at no charge. No transcript will be kept.

d) Summer Audit

e) Summer Independent Study

$330

$220

$220

$675

Online Technology Fee, per credit hour

$25

Student Services Fee (full-time)

$240

Student Services Fee, per credit hour Adult and Graduate Studies

$20

Special Fees

Change of registration - after free change period

$25

Credit by examination - with special permission: per credit hour

$50

Examination, extra or special, for reasons other than extreme emergency

$25

Graduation

$100

Returned check charge

$30

Transcript

$20

Replacement ID card

$20

Withdrawal fee

$25

Residential Hall Charges

Board - Fall or Spring semester

$2,966

Room: McKibbin and Sheaffer-Trieschmann Halls

a) Double room, per person

$1,822

b) Double room, single occupancy

$2,536

c) Single room

$2,211

Residential Suite - Fall or Spring Semester

$3,171

Summary of Typical Expenses (per semester)

Tuition

$13,403

Student Service Fee

$240

Room (Double room, each person)

$1,822

Board

$2,966

Total per semester *

$18,431

* This does not include books, travel, casual expenses, etc., that will vary according to each student's needs.

All charges and fees incurred by a student are the sole legal responsibility of that student and not that of parents, family, or other third party.

Business Office

Payment of Student Accounts

Before the beginning of each semester, the Business Office sends an estimated statement showing charges for the semester and the financial aid expected to be credited to the student account for the semester. The estimated statement and the IW payment plan will be mailed in July for the fall semester and in December for the spring semester. The IWU payment plan must be completed by all students.

All charges for tuition, room and board are due prior to check in for residential students, and before the first day of class for commuters. If an account is not paid in full by the due date, the College regards the account as delinquent unless satisfactory financial arrangements have been made with the Business Office. Students with accounts considered delinquent are not entitled to future registration, room, board or issuance of transcripts.

Four payments are available per semester. Please note payment due dates on the IW payment plan required to be completed by all students. Visa, MasterCard, and Discover are accepted by email, phone, or at the Business Office. A 15% payment plan fee is charged in September and February on outstanding balances. (This does not include those on TMS)

Books are the responsibility of the student.

Alternative Payment Option

Administered by Tuition Management Systems (TMS) for the college, they provide a way to pay educational expenses through manageable monthly installments. The plan may be tailored to cover all or part of the financial obligations for the academic year. It is not a loan. Thus, there are no interest charges. The only cost is an annual non-refundable enrollment fee of $60 for the year. This can be set up for 10 payments if started in July.

Enrollment information and application is available on their website at afford.com. Phone 800-356-8329. Information will also be sent in the summer.

Students who qualify and have work study may apply the earnings to their account balance. When picking up work study checks at the Business Office students may choose to apply them to their outstanding balance by endorsing the back of the check.

Statements

Students can access statements through their portal at any time. Monthly statements are sent to the home address supplied to us by the student. Statements for international students are sent through campus mail and/or email. If there is an address change, it is the student's responsibility to provide the Business Office with current information.

Refunds will be given after the add/drop period of classes. Students need to stop in the Business Office to pick up their refund if applicable or they will be mailed to the home address on file.

Refunds

General Regulations Governing Refunds

  1. Refunds will be available after the account is paid in full, if there is a credit on the account.

  1. Refunds will be made the week after the add/drop date.

  1. Any credit balance associated with a payment that has been made by personal check will be delayed until the check used for payment has cleared the bank. Normally 10 business days will be allowed for such clearance.

The refund dates for 2014-2015 are:

Fall (Day & AGS A)

Refunds available

Refunds mailed

September 10

September 12

AGS B

Refunds available

Refunds mailed

November 5

November 7

Spring (AGS A)

Refunds available

Refunds Mailed

January 28

January 30

Spring (Day)

Refunds available

Refunds mailed

February 4

February 6

AGS B

Refunds available

Refunds mailed

March 25

March 27

Withdrawal

If a student officially withdraws from Iowa Wesleyan University prior to completing 60% of the term, institutional charges for tuition and board will be charged based on the percentage of the term that has been completed. Financial aid awarded will be returned to the federal, state and institutional programs based on the same percentage. Outside scholarships will remain on the student account unless this creates an "over-award" situation or the donor specifically requests a refund. Example: If a student withdraws after completing 20 percent of the term, the student will be charged for 20 percent of tuition and board and retains 20 percent of the financial aid. No reduction in room is given.

Steps to determine financial aid that has been earned by student:

  1. Withdrawal date, the day the student withdraws is the date (determined by the school) that:

  • The student began the withdrawal process prescribed by the school

  • The student otherwise provided the school with official notification of

the intent to withdraw

  • Is the midpoint of the payment period of enrollment for which Title IV assistance was disbursed (unless the institution can document a withdrawal date) if the student does not begin the school's withdrawal process or notify the school of the intent to withdraw

  • Last date of attendance at a documented academically related activity

If the school determines the student did not begin the withdrawal process or notify the school of the intent to withdraw due to illness, accident, grievous personal loss or other circumstances beyond the student's control, the school may determine the appropriate withdrawal date.

  1. Determine the percentage of term completed by the student. The portion of the term completed is based on calendar days from the first day of the term through the last scheduled day of finals, including weekends and breaks of less than five days. If the calculated percentage is equal to or greater than 60%, the student is considered to have "earned" all aid and no adjustment will be made to charges and financial aid.

Days Attended ÷Days in Enrollment Period = Percentage Completed

  1. Percentage completed is applied to the Title IV aid awarded to determine

the student's eligibility for financial aid prior to withdrawal.

Total Aid Disbursed x Percentage Completed = Earned Aid

  1. Determine the amount of unearned financial aid to be returned to the appropriate Title IV financial aid programs.

Total Disbursed Aid - Earned Aid = Unearned Aid to be Returned

  • If the aid already disbursed is greater than the earned aid, the difference must be returned to the appropriate Title IV aid program.

  • If the aid already disbursed is less than the earned aid, a late disbursement will be made to the student.

  1. Determine if the institution and/or student must return the unearned funds.

Iowa Wesleyan Financial Aid Office is required to return any unearned FSA funds that were disbursed to a student's account within 45 days. Return of unearned federal financial aid program funds will be made in the following order:

Unsubsidized Stafford Loans Subsidized Stafford Loans Perkins Loans

Federal PLUS Loan

Federal Pell Grant

Federal Supplemental Educational Opportunity Grant

Other Title IV assistance

The student will receive a statement from the Business Office informing them of the funds that have been returned on his/her behalf. The student will be required to return unearned aid that was directly disbursed to the student. Unearned loan funds must be repaid by the student under the terms and conditions of the promissory note. Unearned grant funds must be returned to the Department of Education. A student must make arrangements to return grant funds within 45 days of receiving notice from the Financial Aid Office. Failure to make payment arrangements will result in the loss of FSA eligibility.

Post Withdrawal Disbursement- Determine earned aid that has not been disbursed.

Total Aid Earned - Total Aid Disbursed = Earned Aid not Disbursed

Grant aid that was earned, but had not been disbursed before the student withdrew, will be applied to the students account within 45 days. Loan proceeds that could be disbursed after the student withdrew will only be disbursed if the student requests a disbursement within 14 days of receiving notice from the Financial Aid Office of his/her eligibility of a post-withdrawal loan disbursement.

Students may withdraw their complete registration prior to the last thirteen weekdays of the term. Following that time one may not withdraw. To officially withdraw a student must complete a form which can be obtained at the Registrar, Student Life or Financial Aid/Business offices. Adult and

Graduate Studies students wishing to withdraw should contact the Adult and Graduate Studies Office.

This policy does not apply to a student who withdraws from some classes but continues to be enrolled in other classes. If a student withdraws from a class after the add-drop date, a "W" will be received through the last day to withdraw from the class and no refund will be given.

If at the end of the semester a student does not receive a passing grade, their faculty will be asked to determine the last date of attendance in their course, to determine if they earned their F's or if they stopped attending earlier in the semester.

Dropping a Class

During the first week of a semester the charge of the dropped course is refunded. After the drop/add period no change in aid is made unless a student withdraws from all courses.

Financial Aid

How to Apply for Financial Aid

Students apply for almost all forms of financial assistance by completing the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) at www.fafsa.ed.gov. Iowa Wesleyan University has an institutional priority filing date of April 1.

  1. Submit an application for admission to Iowa Wesleyan University. You must be accepted to IWU in order to receive any financial assistance.
  2. Complete the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) and list Iowa Wesleyan University (Title IV federal school code: 001871). Please file as soon as possible after January 1, the earliest date each year the FAFSA may be submitted to the Federal Student Aid Program.
  3. Thirty percent of students are selected by the Federal Government for verification. If you are selected, we will notify you in writing requesting the necessary documents. The awarding process begins approximately mid-March.

Iowa Wesleyan University Grants and Scholarships

Iowa Wesleyan University offers a variety of grants and scholarships to full time students during the fall and spring semesters. Any awards made from institutional funds will not change mid-year unless enrollment or living arrangements change. Contact the Financial Aid office for scholarship opportunities and eligibility requirements.

Federal Aid

Pell Grant

For the academic year 2014-15 awards range from $602-$5,730 and are awarded to those students who show the greatest need for assistance. Eligibility is determined from the information you submit on the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA). Part-time students are also eligible for these funds on a prorated basis.

Federal Supplemental Educational Opportunity Grant (FSEOG)

Additional gift assistance awarded to students who also qualify for the Pell Grant, FSEOG is available to students with exceptional need. Funds are limited to and awarded on "highest need" basis who meet the priority deadline. These funds are also available to part-time students.

Work Study

On-campus jobs are awarded to students who show a high need for financial assistance. Average range is $1,000-$2,000 per academic year. A student is eligible to work 6 hours per week at the state or federal (whichever is larger) minimum wage per hour to earn this award. Work study employment is through the Federal Work Study Program or the University's own employment program. Employment opportunities are intended to help students learn new skills in a variety of work settings. Work study can provide valuable experiences while enhancing student resumes.

Student Loans

Loans can be awarded to a student regardless of need. A student must be enrolled at least half-time to qualify for a loan under the Stafford Loan Program. Amounts are based on the student's filing status and grade level. Repayment begins six months after the student is no longer enrolled at least half-time in any college or university. Borrowers must provide a Loan Information Form to the Financial Aid Office indicating the amount they desire to borrow. Loans will be applied in two equal disbursements.

Federal Subsidized Stafford Loan

This loan is need-based and eligibility is determined from the results of the Free Application for Student Aid. Interest payments are made by the federal government while the recipient is at least a half-time student. A student must be enrolled at least half-time to qualify for this loan. Subsidized loans have a 4.66% fixed interest rate, 1.072% origination fee, with a 6 month grace period.

Federal Unsubsidized Stafford Loan

This loan is not based on financial need, although a Free Application for Student Aid must be filed. The student is responsible for the interest. Interest starts when the first disbursement is made. The student can choose to pay the interest or have it capitalized with the principal. Students must be enrolled at least half-time to receive funds from this program. Unsubsidized loans have a 4.66% fixed interest rate, 1.072% origination fee, with a 6 month grace period.

Stafford Subsidized + Unsubsidized Annual Maximum loan limits

Year in School

Credit Hours

Dependent

Subsidized + Unsubsidized

Independent

Subsidized + Unsubsidized

Freshman

0-23.9

$3,500 + $2,000

$3,500 + $6,000

Sophomore

24-55.9

$4,500 + $2,000

$4,500 + $6,000

Junior

56-87.9

$5,500 + $2,000

$5,500 + $7,000

Senior

88-120

$5,500 + $2,000

$5,500 + $7,000

Perkins Loan

Up to $2,000 can be borrowed from Iowa Wesleyan University. A fixed interest rate of 5% with interest and principal payments beginning nine months after a student ceases to be enrolled at least half-time. The number of Perkins Loans awarded is limited to the amount of money that is available, and is awarded based on "exceptional need" on a "first come" basis.

Federal Parent Loan for Undergraduate Students (PLUS)

This program provides loans to parents of undergraduate dependent students. Parents may borrow the difference between the student's cost of education and all other financial assistance. Payment and interest charges begin within 30 to 60 days after 2nd disbursement.

State Aid

Iowa Tuition Grant

Iowa Tuition Grants (ITG) are available for Iowa residents who file the FAFSA on or before July 1 and have an estimated family contribution of $13,500 or less. The maximum individual grant award is $4,550 for the 2015-16 academic year. In the event that available state funds will be insufficient to pay the full amount of each approved grant due to the state's fiscal condition, the Iowa College Student Aid Commission will administratively reduce the maximum award to an amount less than the statutory maximum.

Iowa Grant

Limited funds are available to award up to $1,000 per academic year to students from Iowa who show high need for financial assistance. Must file a FAFSA to be eligible.

Methodist Scholarship Program

United Methodist Loan and Scholarship Programs

Methodist student loans and scholarships are granted to students who hold membership in the United Methodist Church and meet the requirements specified by the General Board of Higher Education and Ministry. Applications and further information may be obtained at www.gbhem.org

United Methodist Higher Education Foundation, Nashville, Tennessee

The Foundation's vision is that it be economically possible for any quali- fied United Methodist student to be educated at a United Methodist-related institution of higher education. Applications and further information may be obtained at https://www.umhef.org/scholarship-info

Iowa United Methodist Foundation, Des Moines, Iowa

The Foundation manages more than 100 named scholarship funds that make awards to students attending United Methodist colleges or universities-- including seminary grants. Applications and further information may be obtained at www.iumf.org/scholarships.asp.

Endowed Scholarships

Created by donor contributions, these specific, endowed scholarships will perpetually provide assistance for Iowa Wesleyan students. The scholarships are created each year from the fund's earnings and growth, with the principle remaining intact. An endowed fund becomes a named and active scholarship when the gifts contributed to it reach or exceed $25,000. Iowa Wesleyan's endowed scholarships are listed below. (Some scholarships were formed with a specific designation, geographically or by field of study, and that preference is indicated.)

  • Leroy Akerson Memorial Scholarship
  • Eleanor E. Bailey Scholarship
  • Frances Dianne Bailey and F.E. "Buck" Bailey Scholarship Memorial Scholarship Fund
  • Fred & Mary Jo Barrick Endowed Scholarship
  • Donald and Marjorie Pixley Beane Endowed Music Education
  • June Berry Scholarship
  • Janey R. Benedict Memorial Endowed Scholarship
  • Beck Brothers Endowed Scholarship
  • Mildred Bensmiller Scholarship
  • Keith Bogle Memorial Scholarship
  • Karin L. Bostrom Appel '71 Endowed Scholarship
  • Karin L. and Robert G. Bostrom Memorial Endowed Scholarship
  • George & Edna Brissey Endowed Scholarship
  • Robert Bruce Scholarship
  • Mary Ellen Buckman Scholarship
  • S.W. Carver Scholarship Fund
  • Miriam Siberts Chrissinger English Scholarship
  • Alma Spencer Chittum Scholarship
  • John W. Chittum Endowed Scholarship
  • Spencer-Chittum Scholarship
  • Class of 1946 Endowed Scholarship
  • Rob Frank V. Coles Scholarship
  • Helen & Frank Coles Scholarship
  • Alberta & Harvey Condon Scholarship
  • Cottrell Scholarship Fund
  • Jack H. and Frances I. Cowen Endowed Scholarship
  • Daughters of the American Colonists Scholarship
  • Nellie E. Davis Scholarship
  • Patricia Hamlin Dodder Memorial Music Scholarship
  • Reverend Robert T. Dodder Endowed Scholarship
  • Clifford E. Dodds Social Science Scholarship Award
  • Christina Foster Edwards Scholarship
  • John Wesley Espy Endowed Scholarship
  • Edwin & Louise Fern Scholarship
  • Vera Bradshaw Fisher Endowed Scholarship
  • Raymond C. Fleck Scholarship
  • Freeland Family Scholarship
  • Delbert & Bernice Hollander Foster Scholarship
  • Holmes and Marjorie Foster Scholarship
  • Elizabeth Garrels Endowed Scholarship
  • Richard E. and Elizabeth Davenport Garrels Endowed Scholarship
  • Claris Fern Jamison (Jamie) Garrett Endowed Scholarship
  • Joan M. Gerling Endowed Scholarship
  • Paul and Elaine Gerot
  • Rev. Jackson A. Giddens Scholarship
  • Goodyear Endowed Scholarship
  • Grau-Quick Scholarship
  • Dr. Frank W. Grube Scholarship
  • Thomas H. & Gladys G. Harney Scholarship
  • Louis A. Haselmayer English Scholarship
  • Donald F. and Flavia M. Haviland Memorial Scholarship
  • A. Hayes Endowed Scholarship
  • Ruth Hazlett Endowed Scholarship
  • William Randolph Hearst Endowed Scholarship
  • Hedlund Family Scholarship (Claire & Louise)
  • Henry County Endowment Fund
  • Darla Hermansfeld Memorial Scholarship
  • Roy D. Hissong Science Scholarship
  • Karen Hornaday Scholarship
  • Wallace & Beverly S. Houts Endowed Scholarship in Art
  • Glen & Isabel James Scholarship
  • Harry E. Jaques Scholarship
  • Douglas A. Jorgensen Endowed Scholarship
  • Beverly Kaighin Scholarship
  • Kent Feeds/Grain Processing Corp. Scholarship
  • Ruth Keraus Memorial Endowed Scholarship
  • Charles L. Kimball Scholarship
  • Edd King Memorial Scholarship
  • J.E. & Helen King Scholarship
  • Irene Lammers & Thomas Morrow & Mary Thomas Lammers Scholarship
  • Gerald Lane Nursing Scholarship
  • Kay Lange English/Communications Endowed Scholarship
  • Beulah F. Larsen Scholarship
  • Rev. Dr. Martin E. Lehmann and Gloria J. Niehaus Lehmann Endowed Scholarship
  • Edith Leopold Scholarship
  • Deborah Mincks Lindeen Scholarship
  • Florence Seeley Lodwick Scholarship
  • William G. Lodwick Endowed Scholarship
  • Grace Mayne Longnecker Scholarship
  • Doud-Loring Scholarship
  • Eilinor T. & John B. Lundgren Memorial Scholarship
  • Markley-Lute Scholarship
  • Dr. Vincent D. Mahoney Elem. Educ. Scholarship
  • Winfield Scott Mayne Scholarship
  • Leah Dell McCahon Scholarship
  • Eugene & Roberta McCoid Scholarship
  • James & Marie McCurdy Endowed Scholarship
  • John McGavic Phi Delta Scholarship
  • Dr. William H. Megorden Music Scholarship
  • Iris Hart Meinhard Outstanding Service Scholarship
  • Dick Millspaugh Endowed Scholarship
  • James R. Mincks Scholarship
  • George L. & Nellie S. Minear Scholarship
  • Clifford & Maxine Manning Scholarship
  • Mediapolis Community H.S. Scholarship
  • Henry & Beulah Mock Scholarship
  • Gladys Jane Moehle Scholarship
  • Vincent A. Naccarato Scholarship
  • Stanley B. Niles Scholarship
  • Ollivier Family Endowed Scholarship
  • P.E.O. Founders Scholarship in Honor of Susan S. Johnston
  • Thomas C. & Gertrude M. Padley Endowed Scholarship
  • Ray L. Patterson Endowed Scholarship
  • Phi Delta Theta Scholarship
  • Lillian Beck Pinegar Scholarship
  • William Poulter Scholarship
  • Charles R. Prewitt Scholarship
  • Josephine E. Price Nursing Scholarship
  • Josephine E. Price Sociology Scholarship
  • Rainbow Scholarship
  • Russell & Elvessa Richards Scholarship
  • Richard Riepe-Pepsico Scholarship
  • Frances Dana Crane Salzman Endowed Scholarship
  • Shaw Family Scholarship
  • Ralph W. & Margaret Shellabarger Scholarship
  • Dr. Edward J. Shook Scholarship
  • George & Ella Sidles Scholarship
  • Alma Smith Endowed Music Scholarship
  • Dan Throop Smith Scholarship
  • R.S. Solinsky Scholarship
  • Spina Family Scholarship
  • Lloyd & Ethel Caris Spooner Scholarship
  • Stafford Family Endowed Scholarship
  • John A. & Florence F. Stephens Endowed Scholarship
  • Mary Swaney Stuntz Endowed Scholarship
  • Marguerite Thomas Endowed Scholarship
  • C.B. Thomas Music Scholarship
  • Glenwood F. & Ailleen Tolson Endowed Music Scholarship
  • Roland Trabue Endowed Scholarship
  • Unkrich Family Endowed Scholarship
  • Orange Van Calhoun Scholarship
  • Max & Helen Volkmann Scholarship
  • Richard G. Voss Scholarship
  • E.J. Warren Trust Scholarship
  • Lois Eckley Webster Scholarship
  • Rev. Mark E. Weston & Murrell Stone Weston Endowed Scholarship
  • Edith Whiting Endowed Scholarship
  • Larry & Virginia Williams End. Nursing Scholarship
  • Russell W. & Betty DeWitt Wittmer Scholarship
  • Dr. Edward Wright Scholarship and Theatre Endowment
  • Mearl & Gladys Wood Scholarship

Trusts

Taylor-Goodell Scholarship Trust

Music Students based on audition performance

Iowa College Foundation - Annual

  • James M. and Betty J. Camp Endowment Scholarship Program
  • Bank of the West
  • The Coca-Cola First Generation Scholarship Program
  • Crane Fund for Widows and Children
  • Charles Stephenson Smith Scholarship Program
  • The UPS Foundation
  • Vera Mayer Scholarship Program
  • Minority Scholarship Program
  • Minority students
  • Iowa Grocery Industry Association Scholarship Program
  • Pioneer George Washington Carver/Henry A. Wallace Scholarships
  • Minority students
  • Principal Financial Group's Information Technology Scholarship Program
  • The H. Dale and Mrs. Lois Bright Scholarship Program
  • Grinnell Mutual Scholarship Program
  • Hormel Foods Charitable Trust Scholarship Program
  • U.S. Bank Scholarship Program
  • Student majoring in Accounting, Business, Finance or Mathematics
  • Iowa Challenge Scholarships "Lets Keep Iowa Students In Iowa"

Policy for Satisfactory Academic Progress for Financial Aid

Federal regulations (General Provision CFR 668.1) require that Iowa Wesleyan University review the academic progress of students who apply for and/or receive financial assistance. To be making satisfactory academic progress toward a degree, students must maintain specified grade point averages and proceed through the program at a pace leading to completion within a specified time frame. This regulation applies to each financial aid applicant, whether a previous recipient or not.

Satisfactory academic progress is evaluated at the completion of each semester, including summer.

The maximum time frame for completing an academic program cannot exceed 150% of the length of the program as measured by credit hours or semesters. In order to ensure that steady progress is being made, students must make incremental progress toward the degree with passing grades.

Students with incomplete grades are required to complete work within five weeks after the regular semester to receive their final grade. An incomplete grade that is not removed at that time will become an F. Withdrawal from a course does not affect a student's number of credit hours. Repetition of a course results in both grades being counted in cumulative average toward student's progress. A student that transfers credits in will have those hours counted as earned and attempted hours when calculating their progress.

The student must maintain at least the GPA as designated in the chart below to be maintain progress. In addition to maintaining the GPA specified below, a student must complete two-thirds, or 67%, of all cumulative attempted course credits to maintain satisfactory academic progress. The following chart indicates the schedule that must be maintained in order to have financial aid disbursed.

Credits Earned

Required

Pace

Cumulative GPA

(Earned/Attempted)

1-23 credits

1.50 GPA

67%

24-55 credits

1.75 GPA

67%

56 - above

2.0 GPA

67%

Financial Aid Warning

Students failing to meet Satisfactory Academic Progress (SAP) standards will receive a warning and will continue to receive financial aid for one semester/session. By the end of the following semester, the student must have met the stated minimum grade point average and completion requirements as defined above. Failure to progress after the warning period will result in probation (after a successful appeal) or loss of all federal, state and institutional financial aid.

Appeal Process

A probation letter describing the appeal process and an appeal form will be provided from the Financial Aid Office. The appeal must include why student was unable to make academic progress and what circumstances have changed to allow student to make academic progress by the next evaluation. Examples of special or unusual circumstances are a personal injury or illness, death of a relative. The appeal form must be submitted to the Financial Aid Office for evaluation. The University will respond to the appeal in writing within two weeks of the set appeal deadline.

Financial Aid Probation

Student will continue to receive financial aid through probation for one additional semester/session when academic progress will again be evaluated. At end of probation, student must be making SAP or following an educational plan established by appropriate parties to continue receiving financial aid. Failure to make SAP or follow educational plan will result in loss of all federal, state and institutional financial aid with no appeal

Academic Calendar

The Academic Calendar is available on the website here.

2015-16 Academic Calendar

Iowa Wesleyan University Calendar 2015-2016

Faculty Workshop

August 10-11 (M-T)

Division Faculty Meetings

August 12 (W)

New Students Arrive

August 12 (W)

New Students Orientation

August 12-16 (W-Su)

New Students Registration Day

August 13 (Th)

Returning Students Arrive

August 17 (M)

Registration/Check-in

August 17 (M)

Classes Begin at 8 a.m.

August 18 (Tu)

Opening Convocation

August 20 (Th)

No Class May Be Added After this Date

August 24 (M)

Last Day to Drop a Class

August 31 (M)

Labor Day Vacation

September 7 (M)

Four Week Grades for Freshmen due 5 p.m.

September 11 (F)

Homecoming Week

September 21- 25 (M-F)

Board of Trustees Meeting

September 24-25 (Th-F)

Homecoming '15

September 26 (Sa)

Mid-term Grade Progress Reports, 5 p.m.

October 9 (F)

Fall Break begins, 5 p.m.

October 9 (F)

Classes resume, 5 p.m.

October 13 (Tu)

Last Day to Withdraw from a Class

October 27 (Tu)

Registration Period

October 27 (Tu)-November 17 (Tu)

Senior Priority Registration begins

October 27 (Tu)

Junior Priority Registration begins

October 30 (F)

Sophomore Priority Registration begins

November 3 (Tu)

Freshmen and Open Registration begins

November 5 (Th)

May Grads Applications to Registrar

November 18 (W)

Thanksgiving Recess Begins, 5 p.m. - AGS Classes meet

November 24 (Tu)

Thanksgiving Break (offices closed)

November 26-27(Th-F)

Classes Resume, 8 a.m.

November 30 (M)

Final Exams

December 7-10 (M-Th)

December Graduate Reception

December 10 (Th) tentative

Residence Halls Close, 5 p.m.

December 10 (Th)

Final Grades to Registrar, 12:00 noon

December 16 (W)

Copy of Grade book to Archive, 5 p.m.

December 18 (F)

Christmas/New Year's Break (Offices Closed) 5:00 p.m.

December 22 (Tu)

Christmas/New Year's Break (Offices Open) 8:00 a.m.

January 4 (M)

Residence Halls Open

January 10 (Su)

Registration/Check-in

January 11 (M)

Classes Begin at 8 a.m.

January 12 (Tu)

Martin Luther King Jr. Day (No Classes)

January 18 (M)

No Class May Be Added After this Date

January 18 (M)

Last Day to Drop a Class

January 25 (M)

Board of Trustees Meeting

January 28-29 (Th-F) tentative

August Grads Applications to Registrar

February 18 (Th)

Grade Progress Reports, 5 p.m.

March 4 (F)

Spring Recess Begins, 5 p.m., Residence Halls Close 5 p.m.

March 4 (F)

Residence Halls Open, 1 p.m.

March 13 (Sun)

Classes Resume, 8 a.m.

March 14 (M)

Registration Period

March 22-April 10 (M-F)

Senior Priority Registration begins

March 22 (T)

Junior Priority Registration begins

March 28 (M)

Sophomore Priority Registration begins

April 1 (F)

Freshmen and Open Registration begins

April 7 (Th)

Last Day to Withdraw from a Class

March 24 (Th)

Good Friday, No Classes (Offices Closed)

March 25 (F)

December Graduates Applications to Registrar

April 11 (M)

Assessment Day

April 13 (W)

Awards Day 11 a.m.

April 28 (Th)

Final Exams and Classes

May 2, 3, 4, 5, (M-Th)

Senior Grades to Registrar

May 3, 4, 5, 6 Senior grades due

24 hours after each exam

Board of Trustees Meeting

May 5-6 (Th-F) tentative

Baccalaureate 10 a.m.

May 7 (Sat)

Commencement 1:30 p.m.

May 7 (Sat)

Residence Halls Close, 5 p.m.

May 7 (Sat)

Final Grades to Registrar, 5 p.m.

May 11 (W)

Copy of Grade book to Archive, 5 p.m.

May 13 (F)

Adult & Graduate Studies

Fall (2015-A) Starts

August 24 (M)

Fall Break (Labor Day)

September 7 (M)

Fall (2015-A) Ends

October 18 (Su)

Fall (2015-B) Starts

October 19 (M)

Thanksgiving Recess

November 25 - 29 (W-Su)

Fall (2015-B) Ends

December 13 (Su)

Spring (2016-A) Starts

January 11 (M)

Spring (2016-A) Ends

March 6 (Su)

Spring (2016-B) Starts

March 7 (M)

Easter Recess

March 25 - 27 (F-Su)

Spring (2016-B) Ends

May 1 (Su)

Summer Session (2016)

May 7 - Aug 14 (Sa-Su)

Fall 2015 Final Exam Schedule

This schedule is based on the first class meeting day and time of the week (do not count Labs as a first meeting).

The exam will be held in the regular meeting classroom except as noted.

Freshman English Classes Monday 7 Dec. 8:00 AM - 9:50 AM

  • All Sections
  • Exam rooms to be determined

All Nursing Courses Monday 7 Dec. 10:00 - 11:50 AM

  • Exam rooms to be determined

Courses with Monday / Wednesday / or Friday Start time for the first meeting of the week:

Class Start Day/ Times Exam Times

8:00 or 8:30 AM Wednesday 9 Dec. 8:00 - 9:50 AM

9:00 or 9:30 AM Wednesday 9 Dec. 10:00 - 11:50 AM

10:00 or 10:30 AM Monday 7 Dec. 1:00 - 2:50 PM

11:00 or 11:30 AM Wednesday 9 Dec. 1:00 - 2:50 PM

12:00 PM (noon), 12:15, or 12:30 PM Thursday 10 Dec. 1:00 - 2:50 PM

1:00 or 1:30 PM Tuesday 8 Dec. 3:00 - 4:50 PM

2:00, 2:15, or 2:30 PM Wednesday 9 Dec. 3:00 - 4:50 PM

3:00, 3:15, or 3:30 PM Monday 7 Dec. 3:00 - 4:50 PM

4:00, 5:00, or 5:15 PM Monday 7 Dec. 5:00 - 6:50 PM

6:00 or 7:00 PM Tuesday 8 Dec. 5:00 - 6:50 PM

Courses with Tuesday / Thursday Start times for the first meeting of the week:

8:00, 8:15, or 8:30 AM Tuesday 8 Dec. 8:00 - 9:50 AM

9:00 or 9:35 AM Thursday 10 Dec. 8:00 - 9:50 AM

10:00 or 11:00 AM Thursday 10 Dec. 10:00 - 11:50 AM

12:50 PM or 1:00 PM Tuesday 8 Dec. 10:00 - 11:50 AM

2:00, 2:15, or 2:30 PM Tuesday 8 Dec. 1:00 - 2:50 PM

3:00, 3:15, or 3:30 PM Thursday 10 Dec. 3:00 - 4:50 PM

4:00, 5:00, or 5:15 PM Wednesday 9 Dec. 5:00 - 6:50 PM

6:00 or 7:00 PM Thursday 10 Dec. 5:00 - 6:50 PM

Spring 2016 Final Exam Schedule

This schedule is based on the first class meeting day and time of the week (do not count Labs as a first meeting).

The exam will be held in the regular meeting classroom except as noted.



Freshman English Classes Monday 2 May 8:00 AM - 9:50 AM

  • All Sections
  • Exam rooms to be determined

All Nursing Courses Monday 2 May 10:00 - 11:50 AM

  • Exam rooms to be determined

Courses with Monday / Wednesday / or Friday Start time for the first meeting of the week:

Class Start Day/ Times Exam Times

8:00 or 8:30 AM Wednesday 4 May 8:00 - 9:50 AM

9:00 or 9:30 AM Wednesday 4 May 10:00 - 11:50 AM

10:00 or 10:30 AM Monday 2 May 1:00 - 2:50 PM

11:00 or 11:30 AM Wednesday 4 May 1:00 - 2:50 PM

12:00 PM (noon), 12:15, or 12:30 PM Thursday 5 May 1:00 - 2:50 PM

1:00 or 1:30 PM Tuesday 3 May 3:00 - 4:50 PM

2:00, 2:15, or 2:30 PM Wednesday 4 May 3:00 - 4:50 PM

3:00, 3:15, or 3:30 PM Monday 2 May 3:00 - 4:50 PM

4:00, 5:00, or 5:15 PM Monday 2 May 5:00 - 6:50 PM

6:00 or 7:00 PM Tuesday 3 May 5:00 - 6:50 PM

Courses with Tuesday / Thursday Start times for the first meeting of the week:

8:00, 8:15, or 8:30 AM Tuesday 3 May 8:00 - 9:50 AM

9:00 or 9:35 AM Thursday 5 May 8:00 - 9:50 AM

10:00 or 11:00 AM Thursday 5 May 10:00 - 11:50 AM

12:50 PM or 1:00 PM Tuesday 3 May 10:00 - 11:50 AM

2:00, 2:15, or 2:30 PM Tuesday 3 May 1:00 - 2:50 PM

3:00, 3:15, or 3:30 PM Thursday 5 May 3:00 - 4:50 PM

4:00, 5:00, or 5:15 PM Wednesday 4 May 5:00 - 6:50 PM

6:00 or 7:00 PM Thursday 5 May 5:00 - 6:50 PM

Campus Map

The Campus

Iowa Wesleyan University's 60-acre tree-covered campus in the heart of Mount Pleasant reflects the value placed by the University on its proud history. Pioneer Hall (1845), Old Main (1855), the Chapel Auditorium (1893) and Hershey Hall (1897) are all still in use today.

Pioneer Hall

Pioneer Hall is the oldest existing University building in continuous use west of the Mississippi River. At the time of completion in 1845, it met the University's academic needs and served as a residence for the president. It currently houses the English and modern languages faculty offices and classrooms.

Old Main

Old Main, the three story building with the golden dome, is the second-oldest building on campus. It provides classroom space, practice rooms, recital hall, faculty offices for the music program, and the headquarters for the Southeast Iowa Symphony Orchestra. The building is listed in the National Register of Historic Places and was restored in 1979 and again in 1989 following a fire on the third floor. The building is known internationally as the home of the P.E.O. Sisterhood; the P.E.O. Founders Room on the second floor is maintained as an historic shrine.

Harlan-Lincoln House

The Harlan-Lincoln House, located on the north side of campus, was built in 1876 by U.S. Senator James Harlan, a former president of Iowa Wesleyan University. Harlan was closely allied with President Abraham Lincoln both personally and politically. Harlan's daughter, Mary, married Robert Todd Lincoln, the only child of the President to survive to adulthood. The Robert Todd Lincoln family brought their three children to the home in Mount Pleasant to spend summers in the 1870s and 1880s. In 1907, Mary Harlan Lincoln gave the House to Iowa Wesleyan University "as a tribute to the memory of my father." Since 1959, the House has been a museum of Harlan and Lincoln family artifacts. It is listed on the National Historic Register. Currently, the executive committee of the Friends of the Harlan-Lincoln House is working to develop the House and museum collection as resources for the University and community.

Chapel

In the central part of campus stands the University Chapel, erected in 1893. Originally it included science labs in the basement, academic offices and an auditorium on the main floor. The Chapel underwent a $5.6 million renovation in 2008-2009. It now houses the Admissions, Financial Aid and Business Offices and the Marketing and Communications department as well as a 720-seat auditorium for campus and community theatre, music, lectures and other cultural programs.

Hershey Hall

Hershey Hall was erected in 1897 and remains one of the few examples of Richardson architecture in the Midwest. It houses on the main floor,the Center for Service-Learning and Civic Engagement and the Internship Office. The entire lower level, in addition to second floor studios, provides studio and office facilities for the art program, including the Design Center Mac lab.

Hershey Hall Annex

Hershey Hall Annex is occupied by the Public Interest Institute, Iowa's only private, nonprofit, public-policy "think tank."

Gymnasium

The Gymnasium, built in 1923, is a three-story structure with a basketball court, shower and locker facilities for both men and women in addition to offices and classrooms for the athletics and physical education programs.

P.E.O. Memorial Building

In 1927 the P.E.O. Sisterhood erected this building in honor of the seven young women who founded the Sisterhood on the campus in 1869. Formerly the campus library, it now houses the offices of the President, Vice President for Academic Affairs, Vice President for Institutional Relations, Alumni Relations, Adult and Graduate Studies, and the Registrar. In addition, the University's Art Gallery is located in the P.E.O. Building.

Sheaffer-Trieschmann Hall

A residence hall for women built in 1953, Sheaffer-Trieschmann is a three-story building which provides living facilities for approximately 240 residents. Two wings were added to the original structure in 1960 which doubled the hall's capacity.

John Wesley Holland Student Union

Completed in 1957, the Student Union houses the cafeteria dining rooms on the second floor as well as the Campus Minister's office, campus nurse, and campus counselor. Located on the first floor are the Bookstore, the mailroom, Student Life Office, student lounge (the Tiger Den) and offices of Student Senate and Student Union Board.

Adam Trieschmann Hall of Science

The three-story Adam Trieschmann Hall of Science is the University's principal classroom building, housing computer labs, and faculty office area. It houses the programs of biology, business administration, Christian studies, psychology and nursing.

George B. McKibbin Hall

This three-story men's residence was completed in the fall of 1966. It houses up to 200 Wesleyan men.

Raymond Chadwick Library

Chadwick Library provides access to information resources that support the University's mission. The collection of over 110,000 print and media items as well as electronic access in over 30 databases supports the curriculum and research needs of students. Students have a variety of study options from individual to small or large groups. The most accessible computer lab on campus is located in the library. Additionally, Chadwick Library is home to the Teacher Education Program, the Academic Resource Center, and the University Archives. Details concerning hours, policies, and services are available on the Library's website at www.iwc.edu/library

Mapleleaf Athletic Complex

A 32-acre tract just east of the campus was developed by a city-wide volunteer project in 1979 to provide athletic facilities to the University and Mount Pleasant schools. The Complex includes a football field, baseball and softball diamonds, all-weather quarter-mile track and other track and field facilities.

Howe Student Activity Center

This 35,000 sq. ft., two-story structure opened August 2001, offering a wide variety of services for Iowa Wesleyan students. The Center connects to the Student Union and features basketball/volleyball courts, conference rooms, athletic training room, bleacher seating for 800 people, a walking/jogging track, fitness/wellness center, offices and more.

Nemitz Suites

The suite-style residence hall, completed in December 2005, provides housing for 32 students in eight four-person suites. Each suite contains four bedrooms, two bathrooms, an efficiency kitchen and living room. The suites are available to residents who hold a high grade point average and are in good standing with University conduct policies.

Directory

Board of Trustees 2014-2015

Officers of the Board

Chairperson

Don Wiley, Mount Pleasant, Iowa; President, Jean C. Wiley and Sons, Inc.

Vice Chairperson

Michael L. Morgan, Marion, Iowa; Minister, First United Methodist Church

Secretary

Mary Elgar, Mount Pleasant, Iowa

Chairperson for Academic Affairs

Annette Jennings Scieszinski, Albia, Iowa

Chairperson for Church Relations

Randall K. Perry, Normal, Illinois; Senior Pastor, Calvary United

Methodist Church

Chairperson for Development/Marketing

Elizabeth Garrels, Mount Pleasant, Iowa; Past President, International

Chapter P.E.O. Sisterhood

Chairperson for Finance

Byron F. Johnson, Barrington Hills, Illinois; Partner (Retired), Arthur

Andersen LLP

Chairperson for Student Affairs

Steve Hedlund, Iowa City, Iowa; Dentist (Retired), Private Practice

Life Trustees

Jerry L. Courtney, Burlington, Iowa

Charles C. Espy, Jr., Fairfield, Iowa Martha A. Hayes, Mount Pleasant, Iowa Waunita W. Hobbie, Mount Pleasant, Iowa Stanley M. Howe, Muscatine, Iowa

Robert A. Miller, Mount Pleasant, Iowa

Jodie B. Wendel, Oceanside, California

Honorary Trustees

Thomas W. Anderson, Cleveland Heights, Ohio

Christie Vilsack, Washington, D.C.

Members of the Board

Ex-Officio Members

Steven E. Titus, J.D., Ph.D., Mount Pleasant, Iowa; President, Iowa Wesleyan

College

Julius C. Trimble, Norwalk, Iowa; Resident Bishop, Iowa Area of The

United Methodist Church

Lilian Gallo Seagren, Mount Pleasant, Iowa; Conference Superintendent, The Iowa Annual Conference of The United Methodist Church; Bishop's Representative

Deborah Stowers, Mount Pleasant, Iowa; Senior Minister, First United

Methodist Church

Ann Klingensmith, Mount Pleasant, Iowa; Chair of the Faculty, Iowa

Wesleyan University

Zachary Cronkhite, Washington, Illinois; President (2014-2015), Student

Government Association, Iowa Wesleyan University

Colin Woods, Davenport, Iowa; Alumni Association Representative

Elected by the Alumni Association

Term Expiring 2017:

Byron F. Johnson, Barrington Hills, Illinois; Partner (Retired), Arthur

Andersen LLP

Gary N. Shaw, St. Charles, Missouri; Managing Director-Investments, Wells

Fargo Advisors, LLC

Term Expiring 2015:

John Cavanah, Burlington, Iowa; Vice President for College Educational

Services (Retired), Southeastern Community College

Kent Swaim, Iowa City, Iowa; Vice Chairman, Economy Advertising Co.

Term Expiring 2016:

Randall K. Perry, Normal, Illinois; Senior Pastor, Calvary United

Methodist Church

Elected by the Board

Term Expiring 2017:

Mary Elgar, Mount Pleasant, Iowa

Steve K. Hedlund, Iowa City, Iowa; Dentist (Retired), Private Practice David L. McCoid, Mount Pleasant, Iowa; Attorney, McCoid Law Office Michael L. Morgan, Marion, Iowa; Minister, First United Methodist Church

Kathy Nellor, Mount Pleasant, Iowa; Chief Retail Banking Officer and

Mount Pleasant Market President (Retired), Two Rivers Bank and Trust

  1. W. Christine Rauscher, Naperville, Illinois; Senior Technical Assistance

Consultant, American Institutes for Research

Kenneth D. Royar, Iowa City, Iowa; Minister (Retired), United Methodist

Church

Annette Scieznski, Albia, Iowa

Term Expiring 2015:

  1. John Badger, Des Moines, Iowa; President, Chartered Financial Services, Ltd.

James M. Brockway, West Burlington, Iowa; Senior Vice President,

Brockway Mechanical & Roofing Company

Elizabeth E. Davenport Garrels, Mount Pleasant, Iowa; Immediate Past

President, International Chapter P.E.O. Sisterhood

Wallace D. Loh, College Park, Maryland; President, University of Maryland Hugh A. Stafford, Bettendorf, Iowa; President, Tri State Companies Winifred K. Thomas, Florham Park, New Jersey; Retired

Christopher M. Van Gels, O'Fallon, Missouri; Senior Manager - L, Shared

Services Group - Site Services & Facilities, The Boeing Company

Don Wiley, Mount Pleasant, Iowa; President, Jean C. Wiley and Sons, Inc.

Term Expiring 2016:

Richard L. Ferguson, Dallas, Texas; CEO & Chairman (Retired), ACT, Inc.

Jason Kiesey, Des Moines, Iowa; Manager, Accounting, John Deere

Financial

Mick Michael, Lexington, Kentucky; Regional Sales Manager (Retired), JCB Corp.

Vincent A. Naccarato, Hinsdale, Illinois; Chairman, Molto Capital LLC

Theodore D. Roth, Rancho Santa Fe, California; President, Roth Capital

Partners, LLC

  1. J. D. Schimmelpfennig, Mount Pleasant, Iowa; President (Retired), Lomont

Molding, Inc.

David M. Stanley, Muscatine, Iowa; Chairman, New Hope Foundation; Chairman, National Taxpayers Union; Chairman, Public Interest Institute

Lori Wright, Naperville, Illinois; (Retired)

Term Expiring 2017:

Dwayne Capper, Solon, Iowa; ENT Medical Services, P.D., M.D., F.A.C.S.

Administration 2015-2016

Office of the President

Steven E. Titus, J.D., Ph.D., President of the College

Holly Frary, B.A., Assistant to the President

Academic Affairs

DeWayne Frazier, Ph. D., Vice President for Academic Affairs

Nancy Erickson, Ph.D., Vice President for Academic Affairs and

Dean Emerita

Cynthia Walljasper, Ph.D., Assistant Dean for Wesleyan Studies

Paula Kinney, M.L.S., Assistant Dean for Academic Resources

Admissions

Scott Briell, M.A., Senior Vice President for Enrollment and

Communications

Ashlee Whipple, M.S., Assistant to the Senior Vice President for Enrollment and Communications

Maribeth Moravec, Assistant to the Dean for Admissions

Josh Kite, M.Ed., Director of Admissions

Jennifer Marlow, B.S., Campus Visit Coordinator/Telecounselor Supervisor

Jack Bruns, B.A., Admissions Counselor Alan Wilkens, B.A., Admissions Counselor Jennifer Camarata, B.A., Admissions Counselor BJ Wagy, M.S., M.B.A., Admissions Counselor

Adult and Graduate Studies

David File, M.A., Associate Vice President and Dean of Adult and

Graduate Studies

Diane Schnicker, Staff Assistant

Athletics

Steve Williamson, B.A., Athletic Director / Head Women's Basketball

Coach

Mandy Borchers, M.S. Athletic Trainer Mike Hampton, B.A., Head Softball Coach Alex Huisman, Head Men's Basketball Coach

Jack Bruns, B.A., Assistant Men's Basketball Coach

Anna Jones, B.S., Assistant Women's Basketball Coach/Sports Information

Director/Sr. Women's Administrator

Dave Lukens, B.A., Assistant Football Coach Kurt Moon, B.A., Head Men's Golf Coach Andy Niemann, M.S., Athletic Trainer

Steve Vitale, Head Men's Soccer Coach

Tom Parkevich, B.S., Head Football Coach Joseph Stubbs, Assistant Football Coach Valerie Unkrich, Faculty Athletic Rep Robert Vitale, Head Women's Golf Coach

BJ Wagy, M.S., M.B.A., Head Volleyball Coach

Jeremy Winzer, B.G.S., Head Women's Soccer Coach

Derek Zander, B.A., Head Baseball Coach/NCAA Compliance Officer

Business Affairs

Shane Dolohanty, B.B.A., Senior Vice President & Chief Financial Officer

Kathy Moothart, B.A., Director of Human Resources Amy Mabeus, Bookstore Director/Mailroom Supervisor Kristi Wohlleber, Student Accounts and Accounts Payable Deb Lillie, B.S., Controller

Russ Benischek, Food Service Director, Sodexo Campus Services

Robert Vitale, Physical Plant Director, National Management Services

Development and Alumni Relations

Meg Richtman, B.A., Vice President for Development and Alumni

Relations

Jim Pedrick, B.A., B.E., Development Director

Dawn Dunnegan, Development Director

Holly Jones, B.A., Director of The Wesleyan Fund

Anita Hampton, B.A., Director of Alumni and Parent Relations

Donna J. Gardner, Administrative Assistant for Alumni and

Parent Relations

Mike Hampton, B.A., Director of Athletic Development and Engagement

Experiential Learning

Arnette Hunger, B.A., OASIS Associate

Vivian Newman, B.A., Writing Specialist

Jane Lauer, M.A., Teacher Education Program (TEP) Services

Administrator

Nicole Briell, M.Ed., Director of the OASIS

Faculty Support

Lorie Hauenstein, Teacher Education Program Associate

Alexandria Holtkamp, Division of Nursing Administrative Assistant

Financial Aid

Information Technology Services

Kit Nip, Ph.D., Associate Vice President and Chief Information Officer

Gena Seberg, B.A., CAMS Manager

Library

Paula Kinney, M.L.S., Library Director

Katherine Adams, ,M.A., E-Resources/Instructional Librarian

Paula Wiley, M.S.L.S., Reference Librarian

Joy Conwell, Circulation Associate

Marketing

Ashlee Whipple, M.S., Director of Marketing

Sheri Michaels, B.F.A., Publications Manager

Registrar

Catherine Ashton, M.A., Registrar

Diane Schnicker, Assistant to the Registrar

Ed Kropa, A.B., Registrar Emeritus

Office of Student Development

Kat Niemann, M.S., Director of Student Engagement

Traci Bender, Assistant to the Dean of Student Development

Erin Mafra, M.S.W., Director of Career Development and Internship

Carol Nemitz, M.A., L.H.D., Vice President and Dean of Student Life

Emeritus

Faculty 2015-2016

Katherine Adams, M.A., E-Resources/Instructional Librarian, B.A., University of Colorado, M.A.L.S., University of Missouri

Rebecca Beckner, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Education, B.S., M.S.

Northwest Missouri State University; Ph.D., University of Missouri

(2012)

  • Chair of the Division of Education

Lori Bell, Ph.D., Visiting Professor of Business and Economics

Richard Buffington, J.D., Director of Criminal Justice Institute, B.S., Western Illinois University, M.A., Arizona State University, J.D., Ohio Northern University, Claude W. Pettit, College of Law (2015)

Kelly Danaher, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Psychology, B.A.,

University of Nebraska-Lincoln; M.A., Ph.D. University of Kansas (2011)

Ricardo Dow y Anaya, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Physical Education.

B.A., Fort Lewis College, Durango, CO; M.S., Ph.D., University of New

Mexico (2012)

  • Coordinator for the Physical Education program

Jason Edwards, D.M., Professor of Music, B.S. in Education, Missouri Western State College; M.A., Truman State University; D.M., Indiana University School of Music (2005)

Shawna Hudson, Ph.D., Professor of Education, B.S., William Jewell College; M.S., Northwest Missouri State University; Ph.D., University of Missouri (2006)

David A. Johnson, Ed.D., Professor of Music, B.A., Western Illinois University; M.A., Western Kentucky University; Ed.D., University of Louisville (2000)

  • Coordinator for the Music Program

Courses

ACCT 227 Financial Accounting I

Credits: 3

A study of the fundamentals of accounting with emphasis on the accumulation of accounting data and the preparation of financial reports for internal and external use. Successful completion of this course will enable the student to prepare and present the financial results of the firm’s operations.

Prerequisites: BA 100 Survey of Business, Sophomore standing.

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Business


ACCT 228 Financial Accounting II

Credits: 3

A continuation of ACTG 217 with emphasis on corporate accounting and an introduction to the analysis and interpretation of accounting data and its use in management of planning and control. Students completing this course successfully will be able to prepare and present internal financial reports to management.

Prerequisites: ACCT 227 Financial Accounting I, ACCT 227 with a grade of C- or higher.

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Business, Business Administration, Business Administration, Economics


ACTG 210 Introduction to Financial Accounting

Credits: 3

Introduction to reporting financial information regarding the operating, investing and financing activities of business enterprises to present and potential investors, creditors, and others.

Prerequisites: BA 100 Survey of Business, Sophomore standing; BA 100

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Business, Business Administration, Business Administration, Economics


ACTG 211 Managerial Accounting

Credits: 3

Managerial accounting is concerned with the development and use of accounting information as it applies to the decision-making process. Attention is given to cost behavior, cost analysis, and budget development. Successful completion of this course will enable students to prepare and explain detailed financial reports as required by management.

Prerequisites: ACCT 228 Financial Accounting II, ACTG 210 Introduction to Financial Accounting, BA 100 Survey of Business, Sophomore Standing; BA 100; ACTG 210 or ACCT 228.

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Business, Business Administration, Business Administration, Economics


ACTG 320 Intermediate Accounting I

Credits: 3

Study of the theory and practice of preparation of external financial reports for the corporate form of business. Income statement and statement of comprehensive income are explored with special emphasis on revenue recognition. Special topics include financial statement analysis, time value of money and the conceptual framework. Additional topics include classification, valuation and presentation of current assets, fixed assets and intangible assets. Students successfully completing this course will be able to develop and explain advanced financial reports for management and/or outside authorities. It is recommended that students plan to complete ACTG 320/ACTG 321 in a semester 1/ semester 2 immediate sequence to ensure all relevant concepts are covered.

Prerequisites: ACCT 228 Financial Accounting II, ACTG 210 Introduction to Financial Accounting, ACTG 211 Managerial Accounting, BA 100 Survey of Business, Junior standing; BA 100; ACTG 210 or ACCT 228; ACTG 211

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions


ACTG 321 Intermediate Accounting II

Credits: 3

Study of the theory and practice of preparation of external financial reports for the corporate form of business. Classification, valuation and presentation of investments, current liabilities, long-term liabilities, and shareholders’ equity will be explored. Special topics include derivatives, accounting changes and correction of errors, earnings per share calculations, preparation of statement of cash flows, and accounting for contingencies, bonds, leases, income taxes, pensions and other postretirement benefits. Students successfully completing this course will be able to develop and explain advanced financial reports for management and/or outside authorities. It is recommended that students complete the ACTG 320/ ACTG 321 in a semester 1/ Semester 2 immediate sequence to ensure all relevant concepts are covered. Junior standing; BA 100; ACTG 210 or ACCT 228; ACTG 211; ACTG 320.

Prerequisites: ACCT 228 Financial Accounting II, ACTG 210 Introduction to Financial Accounting, ACTG 211 Managerial Accounting, ACTG 320 Intermediate Accounting I , BA 100 Survey of Business, Junior standing; BA 100; ACTG 210 or ACCT 228; ACTG 211; ACTG 320.

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Business


ACTG 322 Cost Accounting

Credits: 3

A study of the generation and use of cost data for cost measurement, cost control and managerial purposes. This is an advanced managerial accounting course. Students successfully completing this course will be able to prepare and explain advanced financial reports to management.

Prerequisites: ACCT 228 Financial Accounting II, ACTG 210 Introduction to Financial Accounting, ACTG 211 Managerial Accounting, BA 100 Survey of Business, Junior standing; BA 100; ACTG 210 or ACCT 228; ACTG 211

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Business


ACTG 340 Introduction to Federal Tax

Credits: 3

Provides background in federal income tax law and the regulations of the Treasury Department. The course also deals primarily with basic philosophy of taxation, taxable income, allowable deductions and gains, losses of sales and exchanges of property for the individual taxpayer. This course serves also as an introduction to the federal taxation of partnerships and corporations. Discusses tax planning alternatives. Students successfully completing this course will be able to describe, identify, and report the types of income that are subject to federal tax.

Prerequisites: ACCT 228 Financial Accounting II, ACTG 210 Introduction to Financial Accounting, ACTG 211 Managerial Accounting, BA 100 Survey of Business, Junior stand- ing; BA 100; ACTG 210 or ACCT 228; ACTG 211

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Business


ACTG 342 Advanced Federal Tax

Credits: 3

This course examines in greater depth federal income tax law and regulations applicable to partnerships, corporations, and fiduciaries. Also covers federal gift and estate tax principles, reorganizations, personal holding companies, and the accumulated earnings tax. Emphasizes tax planning, including timing of transactions, appropriate form of transactions and election of methods when alternative methods are available under the law. Students successfully completing this course will be able to prepare required tax reports and explain the federal tax environment faced by the modern business.

Prerequisites: ACCT 228 Financial Accounting II, ACTG 210 Introduction to Financial Accounting, ACTG 211 Managerial Accounting, ACTG 340 Introduction to Federal Tax , BA 100 Survey of Business, Junior standing; BA 100; ACTG 210 or ACCT 228; ACTG 211; ACTG 340

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Business, Business Administration


ACTG 360 Accounting Information Systems

Credits: 3

Hands-on analysis of computer-based accounting information systems including flowcharting of business processes and study of internal controls. Students will develop their skills with MS EXCEL, MS Access, and selected accounting software through the completion of accounting-specific computer projects.

Prerequisites: ACCT 228 Financial Accounting II, ACTG 210 Introduction to Financial Accounting, ACTG 211 Managerial Accounting, ACTG 320 Intermediate Accounting I , ACTG 321 Intermediate Accounting II, BA 100 Survey of Business, BA 350 Business Information Systems, Junior standing; BA 100; BA 350; ACTG 210 or ACCT 228; ACTG 211; ACTG 320; ACTG 321

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Business, Business Administration


ACTG 380 Topics in Accounting

Credits: Variable

Selected topics in the area of accounting. Topics vary from year to year depending upon student demand and the judgment of the Division.

Prerequisites: Consent of instructor

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Business


ACTG 398 Experiential Learning Practicum

Credits: 3-6

A closely supervised employment experience which allows the student to explore career opportunities in the areas of accounting, business and economics. Allows the student to make a limited application of knowledge, skills and abilities imparted/ developed in the classroom. Students successfully completing this course will be able to explain and describe the similarity/contrast of accounting theory and practice.

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Business


ACTG 430 Advanced Accounting

Credits: 3

A study of accounting and procedures related to business combinations particularly as related to the preparation of consolidated financial statements. Students successfully completing this course will be able to describe and explain the financial complications that arise with business mergers and acquisitions.

Prerequisites: ACCT 228 Financial Accounting II, ACTG 210 Introduction to Financial Accounting, ACTG 211 Managerial Accounting, ACTG 320 Intermediate Accounting I , ACTG 321 Intermediate Accounting II, BA 100 Survey of Business, Senior standing; BA 100; ACTG 210 or ACCT 228; ACTG 211; ACTG 320; ACTG 321.

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Business


ACTG 431 Auditing, Principles and Procedures

Credits: 3

A study of the function of the independent CPA in regard to the examination of financial statements. Considerable attention is devoted to the purpose of the audit, the responsibilities of the CPA in rendering his opinion, liability of the auditor, planning of the audit, and limitations of the audit. Students successfully completing this course will be able to explain and describe an outside audit of a firm.

Prerequisites: ACCT 228 Financial Accounting II, ACTG 210 Introduction to Financial Accounting, ACTG 211 Managerial Accounting, ACTG 320 Intermediate Accounting I , ACTG 321 Intermediate Accounting II, BA 100 Survey of Business, Senior standing; BA 100; ACTG 210 or ACCT 228; ACTG 211; ACTG 320; ACTG 321

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Business


ACTG 440, 441, 442 Experiential Learning–Career Applications

Credits: 2-6

An Internship option designed to meet the needs of students who are employed full-time and who are seeking career enhancement experiences rather than career initiation skills.

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Business


ACTG 450 Government and Nonprofit Accounting

Credits: 3

Study of principles and procedures followed in accounting for the operation of governmental and nonprofit organizations. Successful students in this course will be able to explain and describe the accepted methods of accounting for government and nonprofit firms, as compared to for-profit firms.

Prerequisites: ACCT 228 Financial Accounting II, ACTG 210 Introduction to Financial Accounting, ACTG 211 Managerial Accounting, ACTG 320 Intermediate Accounting I , ACTG 321 Intermediate Accounting II, BA 100 Survey of Business, Senior standing; BA 100; ACTG 210 or ACCT 228; ACTG 211; ACTG 320; ACTG 321.

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Business


ACTG 490 Advanced Readings in Accounting

Credits: 1-3

An advanced reading course in which the student will read books from a bibliography provided by the instructor. For each credit hour the student must read five books. The student will be graded based on his or her analysis of each reading. Written and oral reports will be required. No more than a total of three credit hours will be allowed. Students successfully completing this course will have a wide breadth of knowledge in the chosen topic area.

Prerequisites: Senior standing; 3.35 GPA; and consent of advisor and division chairperson.

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Business


ACTG 498 Experiential Learning–Internship

Credits: 6-14

An employment/work experience which, as closely as possible, represents normal employment/work conditions. The student is enabled to apply knowledge, skills and abilities imparted/developed in the classroom setting to “real world” business situations.

Prerequisites: Junior standing and approval of program liaison.

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Business


ARC 101 English Language Skills I

Credits: 2

This course allows students who are not native English speakers to develop their reading, writing, speaking and listening skills. The course curriculum will include grammar, vocabulary, conversation strategies, pronunciation, listening, reading, writing, and free talk. Formal and informal activities will be used for best results.

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Office of Academic Success and Inclusive Support (O.A.S.I.S.)


ARC 102 English Language Skills II

Credits: 2

Students who are not native English speakers can continue to develop their reading, writing, speaking and listening skills in this course. The course curriculum will include grammar, vocabulary, conversation strategies, pronunciation, listening, reading, writing, and free talk. Formal and informal activities will be used for best results.

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Office of Academic Success and Inclusive Support (O.A.S.I.S.)


ARC 105 College Learning and Reading Efficiency

Credits: 2

College Learning and Reading Efficiency is a course designed to help students develop the reading and study skills necessary to do college level reading and learning. Emphasis will be placed on vocabulary, comprehension, critical thinking, various learning techniques, reading strategies, note taking, test taking skills and other strategies to improve performance in other courses.

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Office of Academic Success and Inclusive Support (O.A.S.I.S.)


ARC 200 Introduction to Peer Tutoring

Credits: 1

Introduction to Peer Tutoring develops basic tutoring skills, researching and writing a report on best practices in tutoring, and tutoring for the OASIS which can be used as service learning.

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Office of Academic Success and Inclusive Support (O.A.S.I.S.)


ARC 201 Advanced Peer Tutoring

Credits: 1

Advanced Peer Tutoring develops tutoring skills, assisting in the training and mentoring of new tutors, writing a reflective paper on tutoring practices and tutoring for the OASIS which can be used as Service Learning.

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Office of Academic Success and Inclusive Support (O.A.S.I.S.)


ART 109 Survey of Visual Communication

Credits: 3

Survey of Visual Communication is an introduction to the broad field of visual communication. The students will explore through sample projects four main areas: The Design Process; Business Concepts as they relate to the major; Technological aspects such as hardware, software and peripherals and The Media (print, electronic, broadcast). Students will learn problem solving skills and design principles using the tools and resources implemented by designers in the Visual Communication field.

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Humanities


ART 201 Basic Studio and Design 2-D`

Credits: 3

Foundations of Design introduces students to two and three-dimensional design utilizing an integrated approach of visual organization. Students will discuss using design vocabulary projects that they produced. Areas that will be emphasized are image composition, color theory, elements of organization and principles of 2-D physical structure. These projects will be accomplished using a broad variety of studio approaches: drawing, painting, photography, ceramics, craft medium, and architectural concepts.

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Humanities


ART 203 Art Appreciation

Credits: 3

A topical and historical approach to understanding fundamental aesthetic principles as apparent in great works of painting, drawing, sculpture and architecture. Recommended for non-majors who wish to broaden understanding of the field. Students will gain a vocabulary of design and art terms. Application of this knowledge will then be applied to visual elements of art and architecture as they related to world culture.

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Humanities


ART 204 Graphic Layout and Design

Credits: 3

Provides an introduction to the methods, materials, industry standard computer programs and techniques used in the development of various types of publications and advertising layout. Students will explore the fundamental elements of design, compose documents electronically, analyze design based on principles of perception, understand pre-press, and present completed projects while developing an understanding and critical awareness of contemporary practices.

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Humanities


ART 207 Photography I (WI)

Credits: 3

An introduction to basic digital photography, digital software and traditional black and white photography concepts. Specifically these areas are camera functions, image composition, lighting, and digital input, and presentation of images.

Prerequisites: ENG 105 College Composition and Research (WI) , ENG 201 Writing and Research about Literature (WI) , Lecture/demonstration/lab. Writing Intensive Course: Successful Completion of English 105 & 201 required.

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Humanities


ART 209 Multimedia Development

Credits: 3

An introduction to the methods, materials, computer programs and techniques used in the development of multimedia created for distribution by, various media and the internet. Students will learn to use graphic images, photography, typed word, and animation, video and sound to communicate with targeted audiences. Utilizing computer tutorials and design oriented assignments the students will develop an understanding and critical awareness of contemporary practices in this electronic medium.

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Humanities


ART 215 Painting I

Credits: 3

This introduction to the medium of painting serves both majors and non-majors with an exploration of composition, materials and techniques. Studies will include landscape, figure and still life painting. Application of design principles and color theory will be tested through a series of assignments that challenge students to translate theory into product. Works by major painters will be examined utilizing library research, investigation of contemporary artists and museum visits as part of the evaluation process. A final group critique and portfolio presentation is required.

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Humanities


ART 216 Ceramics I

Credits: 3

A beginning course in pottery and ceramic sculpture focusing on hand building processes. Students will be expected to grow in understanding of three dimensional design considerations and their individual technical skills. No previous experience is required.

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Humanities


ART 219 Drawing I

Credits: 3

This is a beginning class and provides an opportunity for students learn the basic skills of drawing. Students will use a variety of materials, incorporate elements of design, explore composition, work with the figure and proportion and develop a sense of personal aesthetic by looking at the work of other artists. The student will also be required to participate with others in informal and formal critiques. Evaluation will be based on daily work, longer projects and the final portfolio.

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Humanities


ART 225 Painting II

Credits: 3

Painting II focuses on the exploration and development of style and technique. Emphasis will be on individual development and competence in approach to medium, exploration of new materials and an expanded sense of aesthetic decision making. Students will be required to complete a variety of assignments that demonstrate successful application of skills acquired in the introductory class. Interaction with peers, art faculty, and participation in group critique and field trips will be part of the evaluation process. Each student must participate in the final critique and provide a final portfolio.

Prerequisites: ART 215 Painting I, ART 215 Painting I

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Humanities


ART 226 Ceramics II

Credits: 3

Ceramics II focuses on advanced technical production of ceramics including wheel thrown pots, combinations hand/wheel pieces, glaze making and specialized firing procedures. Application of skills acquired in Ceramics I will be expected. Each student will share in the responsibility of mixing and preparing the appropriate clay body, mixing glazes and participate in the kiln firings. Emphasis is placed on craftsmanship and personal creativity.

Prerequisites: ART 216 Ceramics I, ART 216 Ceramics I

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Humanities


ART 229 Drawing II

Credits: 3

This course is a follow-up opportunity for students to expand their knowledge and skill in drawing in particular the human figure and anatomy. Students will create a portfolio based on daily drawing and longer assignments that documents a use a variety of new materials, study of anatomy and a further development of a personal aesthetic by looking at the work of other artists. The student will also be required to participate with others in informal and formal critiques.

Prerequisites: ART 219 Drawing I, ART 219 Drawing I

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Humanities


ART 269 Interactive Media

Credits: 3

An introduction to the methods, materials, computer programs and techniques used in development of interactive media. Students will create electronic assignments that will allow the viewer to make choices in the projects’ content. The format may be a web site with many pages or interactive presentations containing branching menus inviting the viewer’s participation. Using computer software with design oriented assignments, the students will interview a client to define the product, identify the audience and type of communication that will meet project goals. This course will be available only to students who have a demonstrated ability to work on their own. Student will meet with art faculty for critiques and progress reports.

Prerequisites: Permission of art faculty

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Humanities


ART 304 Graphic Layout and Design II

Credits: 3

In this continuation of ART 204, students will work with advanced software applications, typography, and logo creation. Utilizing computer tutorials and design oriented assignments the students will develop an understanding and critical awareness of contemporary practices.

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Humanities


ART 310 Digital Illustration

Credits: 3

This is an advanced course that further explores and utilizes the concepts, computer skills and design experience developed from other courses: Photography, Drawing, Painting, Graphic Layout and Design. The student will work with digital input of hand drawings, paintings or other medium and translate them into digital illustrations using primarily Illustrator and Photoshop. The course will also introduce illustrators and their roles in Graphic Design.

Prerequisites: ART 204 Graphic Layout and Design, ART 207 Photography I (WI), ART 216 Ceramics I, Art 207, 204, 216

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Humanities


ART 335 Painting III

Credits: 3

Painting III provides an opportunity for students to expand and develop their painting skills and techniques while developing an individual sense of style. Although students are expected to attend during scheduled class hours at levels III and IV, work in Hershey Hall private studios is permitted. Participants are, however, to meet in critique with other painting students and participate in field trips.

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Humanities


ART 336 Ceramics III

Credits: 3

This course will provide advanced students with further opportunity for investigation into areas of ceramics including: artists, materials, and methods. Advanced hand building, wheel throwing techniques, larger scale and establishment of professional goals are possible goals for the course. Projects may be sculptural and focused on “one of a kind” pots. Students will establish individual project road maps while interacting with art faculty and fellow students during studio and critiques.

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Humanities


ART 339 Drawing III

Credits: 3

Drawing III provides student with a structured approach to advanced study. With input and consultation with the instructor, the student will design their own goals and objectives for the course. A final portfolio work is required. Students will select from areas of drawing exploration include new materials, methods, drawing construction and thematic development. Work in private studio is permissible during scheduled class hours. Students are, however, required to participate with faculty and students during critiques and field trips.

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Humanities


ART 345 Painting IV

Credits: 3

Painting IV provides additional growth in painting skills, techniques and personal style. This class will serve the serious studio major with opportunity to complete a body of work capable of completing a strong portfolio for exhibit submissions and graduate schools applications. Although students are expected to attend during scheduled class hours at levels III and IV, work in Hershey Hall private studios is permitted. Participants are, however, to meet in critique with other painting students and participate in field trips.

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Humanities


ART 346 Ceramics IV

Credits: 3

Ceramics IV provides advanced students with time for investigating areas of ceramics including: materials, advanced hand building, wheel throwing techniques, larger scale. Glaze calculation and kiln operation/construction are other areas of exploration. Students will establish individual project roadmaps while interacting with art faculty and fellow students during studio and critiques. Establishment of professional goals, portfolio preparation for exhibitions and graduate applications will be a valuable end product of this course. Students will establish individual project roadmaps while interacting with art faculty and fellow students during studio and critiques.

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Humanities


ART 349 Drawing IV

Credits: 3

Drawing IV provides students with a structured approach to advanced study. The student with the instructor and choose one area or theme. A final portfolio is required. Areas of drawing exploration include new materials, methods, drawing construction and thematic development. Work in private studio is permissible during scheduled class hours. Students are, however, required to participate with faculty and students during critiques and field trips.

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Humanities


ART 359 Printmaking

Credits: 3

An introductory course designed to acquaint the student with various processes in the printmaking field. Students will learn the basic principles of monotype, relief and intaglio printmaking: historical context, tools, safety, and processes. A background in drawing and 2-D design is recommended.

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Humanities


ART 368 Advanced Studio Studies

Credits: 3

An opportunity for the advanced student to explore a studio or art history topic beyond the regularly scheduled courses available to students in the Art Program. This course will be available only to students who have a demonstrated ability to work on their own, meeting with art faculty for critiques and progress reports.

Prerequisites: Permission of art instructor.

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Humanities


ART 379 Advanced Visual Communication and Design

Credits: 3

Advanced students will improve their professional skills and portfolio in one of six specific areas of Visual Communication: 1) Print Media, 2) Interactive Media, 3) Multimedia, 4) Internet Design, 5) Animation, or 6) Digital Photography. The students and the instructor will determine areas requiring more concentration. The students will develop professional projects to strengthen their portfolios, thus enhancing their portfolios, thus enhancing their employment opportunities in the Visual Communication field.

Prerequisites: ART 204 Graphic Layout and Design, ART 209 Multimedia Development, ART 304 Graphic Layout and Design II, ART 204 Graphic Layout and Design, ART 304 Graphic Layout and Design II, and ART 209 Multimedia Development.

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Humanities


ART 380 Topics in Art

Credits: 3

An opportunity for advanced students to request a class in a topical area not offered on regular basis through the program. A class might be established in such areas as photography, sculpture, crafts or art history.

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Humanities


ART 381 History of Art I (WI)

Credits: 3

A study of major artistic achievements in the western world from prehistoric times to the late Middle Ages. Students will become familiar with the emergence of visual imagery and the development of style. Students will learn to recognize cultural differences and be able to identify distinct characteristics of each, while acknowledging their interconnectedness and contributions to other societies. Students will develop an appreciation of visual imagery and its impact on culture and the advancement of society.

Prerequisites: ENG 105 College Composition and Research (WI) , ENG 201 Writing and Research about Literature (WI) , Writing Intensive Course: Successful Completion of English 105 and 201 required.

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Humanities


ART 382 History of Art II (WI)

Credits: 3

This course opens with an investigation of major artistic achievements of the Renaissance and continues to the mid 1800s. A continuation of ART 381, but all art history need not be taken in sequence. The age of discovery, shifting of political models, the fortification of the church and eventual move of artists from established academic styles to individual expression will be discussed. Students will gain an understanding of the immense power artists of this time held and how their images helped shape opinion during this time period.

Prerequisites: ENG 105 College Composition and Research (WI) , ENG 201 Writing and Research about Literature (WI) , Writing Intensive Course: Successful Completion of English 105 and 201 required.

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Humanities


ART 383 History of Art III (WI)

Credits: 3

A study of contemporary issues in art from 1850 to the present. Stylistic evolution, historical context and the effect of popular culture on the visual arts will be our focus for the semester.

Prerequisites: ENG 105 College Composition and Research (WI) , ENG 201 Writing and Research about Literature (WI) , Writing Intensive Course: Successful Completion of English 105 and 201 required.

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Humanities


ART 398 Practicum in Graphic Design

Credits: 3

An opportunity to work in a professionally supervised setting in fields such as publications, design and display. Practica are arranged with guidelines available from the art faculty.

Prerequisites: Proposals must be approved before registration.

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Humanities


ART 440, 441, 442 Career Applications

Credits: 2-6

Internship projects that do not fit a six credit hour internship.

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Humanities


ART 497 Independent Studies

Credits: 1-3

A course for advanced students who wish to work on special problems in art. Periodic conferences and reports on progress will be required.

Prerequisites: Advanced standing, a written project proposal, consent of instructor.

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Humanities


ART 498 Internship

Credits: 6-14

The internship allows for a substantive Internship in art. The internship will be tailored to the student’s particular interest and developed skill. The number of hours involved with a particular internship will determine the number of credit hours to be earned. Planning and project research must take place with the instructor during the junior year. The internship normally takes place during the senior year. Specific qualifications, guidelines and project placement information may be obtained from the program advisor. All plans and decisions will be made in consultation with both the student’s academic advisor and the Director of Internship.

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Humanities


ART 499A Senior Seminar

Credits: 1

Senior Seminar (A) will focus on the preparation of credential materials and the portfolio and electronic portfolio. A written philosophy of art, a cover letter and photographing art work will also be included. Individuals are expected to check in with art faculty for evaluation and progress report.

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Humanities


ART 499B Senior Seminar

Credits: 1

Senior Seminar (B) will center around the Senior Art Exhibition. Activities will include all aspects of the show: selection of work, designing invitations, compiling a mailing list, matting and framing, designing the exhibition space to accommodate both two and three dimensional work, installation and lighting. Students will be evaluated by the quality and professionalism of the work, as well as effectiveness when working as a team. Senior Seminar (A) and (B) are considered the capstone course and final assessment piece for the art major.

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Humanities


BA 100 Survey of Business

Credits: 3

A survey of the structure and functions of the American business system is provided, together with an overview of business organization, accounting, finance, principles of management, economics, marketing, personnel and the interdependence of business, the community and government. Upon successful completion of the course, the student will be able to describe and explain the basic internal functional areas of a business, and their relationship to outside stakeholders.

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Business, Business Administration, Business Administration


BA 101A Microsoft Outlook Certification

Credits: 1

Students who successfully complete the Microsoft certification examinations demonstrate that they can meet globally recognized performance standards. Students receive a certificate from Microsoft Corporation which is then transferred onto their Iowa Wesleyan University transcript.

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Business


BA 101B Microsoft Word Certification

Credits: 1

Students who successfully complete the Microsoft certification examinations demonstrate that they can meet globally recognized performance standards. Students receive a certificate from Microsoft Corporation which is then transferred onto their Iowa Wesleyan University transcript.

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Business


BA 101C Microsoft Excel Certification

Credits: 1

Students who successfully complete the Microsoft certification examinations demonstrate that they can meet globally recognized performance standards. Students receive a certificate from Microsoft Corporation which is then transferred onto their Iowa Wesleyan University transcript.

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Business


BA 101D Microsoft PowerPoint Certification

Credits: 1

Students who successfully complete the Microsoft certification examinations demonstrate that they can meet globally recognized performance standards. Students receive a certificate from Microsoft Corporation which is then transferred onto their Iowa Wesleyan University transcript.

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Business


BA 101E Microsoft Access certification

Credits: 1

Students who successfully complete the Microsoft certification examinations demonstrate that they can meet globally recognized performance standards. Students receive a certificate from Microsoft Corporation which is then transferred onto their Iowa Wesleyan University transcript.

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Business


BA 102A Resume/Cover Letter Writing

Credits: 0

This seminar reviews the development and effective use of a resume, cover letter, and on-line job application processes.

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Business


BA 102B Job Search Success

Credits: 0

This seminar informs students on best and worst ways to search for internships and full-time positions in the workforce, steps to take during the job search process and how to build and maintain a professional and online network.

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Business


BA 102C Interviewing Strategies

Credits: 1

This seminar helps students understand the ways to prepare for job interviews, tactics and strategies to employ during an interview, and the proper way to follow up with potential employers after a job interview.

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Business


BA 102D Dress for Success

Credits: 0

This seminar reviews the proper dress for various types of interviews, work-related functions, and social situations common in today’s workplace.

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Business


BA 102E Dining Etiquette

Credits: 0

This seminar helps students understand proper dining etiquette in business and social situations, including seating, introductions, toasts, utensils, plate, and glassware us- age.

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Business


BA 102F Life after College

Credits: 0

This seminar is designed to help students understand and prepare for their financial responsibilities after college, learn about company culture and practice professional manners.

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Business


BA 103 Microsoft Office Skills I

Credits: 3

This course is one of two courses designed to prepare students to successfully complete certification for components of the Microsoft Office software suite. This course gives students the practical instruction required to allow them to pass the certification examinations.

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Business


BA 104 Microsoft Office Skills II

Credits: 3

This course is one of two courses designed to prepare students to successfully complete certification for components of the Microsoft Office software suite. This course gives students the practical instruction required to allow them to pass the certification examinations.

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Business


BA 242 Introduction to Value Investing

Credits: 3

Introduction to investment strategies and philosophy developed by Benjamin Graham and Warren Buffett. Development of analysis tools to select and monitor the single firm’s performance will be emphasized. The use of a stock market simulation game will be a requirement of the course. Upon successful completion of this course a student will be able to describe the investing strategy of Benjamin Graham and Warren Buffett; explain the career opportunities for those who work with investments; describe and perform accepted value-investing techniques in stock selection and explain and describe how stocks are bought and sold in an on-line environment.

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Business


BA 310 Principles of Management

Credits: 3

This course is a study of the basic principles, concepts, theories and analytical tools in management. Topics include introduction to management, planning and decision- making, organizing for stability and change, leading and controlling. Consideration will be given to both theoretical and practical aspects of management. Students completing this course successfully will be able to describe both the theoretical back- ground and practical applications of popular business management principles and strategies.

Prerequisites: BA 100 Survey of Business, ECN 102 Macroeconomics , Junior standing; BA 100; ECN 102.

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Business


BA 311 Small Business Management

Credits: 3

Focus is on effective management of small business firms. The management process includes not only strategy determination, but also the varied activities necessary in planning, organizing, actuating and controlling small business operations. Emphasis is placed upon those aspects of small business management that are uniquely important to small firms.

Prerequisites: BA 100 Survey of Business, BA 310 Principles of Management , ECN 102 Macroeconomics , Junior standing; BA 100; BA 310; ECN 102.

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Business


BA 312 Analysis of Organizational Behavior

Credits: 3

Enables the student to apply the concepts learned in various business administration, accounting and economics courses to real-life cases and in-depth studies of business organizations and their participants.

Prerequisites: BA 100 Survey of Business, BA 310 Principles of Management , ECN 102 Macroeconomics , Junior standing; BA 100; BA 310; ECN 102.

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Business


BA 320 Principles of Marketing

Credits: 3

A study of the problems involved in making marketing decisions for the consumer and organizational markets. Study includes the price of the product, the promotion of the product, and the channels of distribution for the product. Successful completion of the course will enable the student to make sound product, price, distribution, and promotion decisions for a specific product or service offering.

Prerequisites: BA 100 Survey of Business, ECN 101 Microeconomics , BA 100; ECN 101.

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Business


BA 321 Consumer Behavior

Credits: 3

Consideration of the behavioral aspects of marketing; discussion of the factors which influence consumers in the buying process. The influence of the factors of family, social class, life cycle and life-style in the product selection and buying process. Upon successful course completion, students will be able to describe the differences between niche markets that determine their different buying behaviors and preferences.

Prerequisites: BA 100 Survey of Business, BA 320 Principles of Marketing , ECN 101 Microeconomics , Junior standing; BA 100; BA 320; ECN 101.

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Business


BA 322 Principles of Advertising

Credits: 3

A discussion of the importance of advertising in the development of a comprehensive marketing strategy. Considers the factors of motivation, communication of the advertising message, development of the advertising message, and selection of appropriate media. Students successfully completing the course will be able to describe the foundations of advertising theory and their application to a modern advertising strategy.

Prerequisites: BA 100 Survey of Business, BA 320 Principles of Marketing , ECN 101 Microeconomics , Junior standing; BA 100; BA 320; ECN 101.

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Business


BA 323 Marketing Research

Credits: 3

An introduction to the methodology and analysis of marketing research. Explores the uses of marketing research in management decision making. Students will design, conduct, analyze and present the results of a marketing research project. Topics include research design, data acquisition and analysis, creation of research reports and research ethics.

Prerequisites: BA 100 Survey of Business, BA 320 Principles of Marketing , ECN 101 Microeconomics , ECN 240 Applied Statistics for Economics and Business , MATH 171 Elementary Statistics , Junior standing; BA 100; BA 320; ECN 101; MATH 171; ECN 240.

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Business


BA 324 Marketing Management

Credits: 3

Advanced study of marketing planning, strategy, and decision-making utilizing marketing principles covered in BA 320, Principles of Marketing. Emphasis is placed on analysis of real-life cases.

Prerequisites: BA 100 Survey of Business, BA 320 Principles of Marketing , ECN 101 Microeconomics , Junior standing; BA 100; BA 320; ECN 101.

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Business


BA 330 Business Law

Credits: 3

A study of traditional business law topics - contracts, sales, torts, agency, business organizations and other basic topics. Successful completion of this course will enable students to understand and use business law principles to guide sound business decisions.

Prerequisites: BA 100 Survey of Business, Junior standing; BA 100 or consent of instructor.

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Business


BA 332 Administrative and Personnel Law

Credits: 3

This course studies the effects of administrative and personnel laws on the decision- making responsibilities of employers, employees and Human Resource Practitioners. It explores the impact of personnel policies and practices of organizations and addresses the development, intent and implications of protective legislation from the federal to the local level. Upon completing the course the student will be able to demonstrate understanding in legal and regulatory factors in personnel law; laws affecting employers, employees and contractors; identifying elements in a total compensation system/pay rules; job analysis, description and evaluation; union and management legal requirements; rules governing employee benefit and leave programs; and basic procedures to manage a compensation system.

Prerequisites: BA 100 Survey of Business, BA 330 Business Law , Junior standing; BA 100; BA 330.

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Business


BA 340 Corporate Financial Management

Credits: 3

Introduces the student to the goals and objectives of financial management within the corporate setting. Students will become familiar with functions of the various financial areas, the development and use of information by the financial manager, and the various analytical tools and techniques used. Successful completion of this course will enable students to make sound, risk-sensitive financial decisions for their business. Emphasis will be placed upon financial decision making.

Prerequisites: ACTG 210 Introduction to Financial Accounting, BA 100 Survey of Business, MATH 171 Elementary Statistics , BA 100; ACTG 210; MATH 171.

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Business


BA 341 Investments

Credits: 3

This course introduces the student to investment philosophy and investment alternatives. The viewpoint is that of the individual investor. Students will become familiar with various investment vehicles, sources of information contained in the financial press, as well as methods of interpreting the behavior of the financial markets. Successful completion of the course will enable students to make balanced, risk-measured asset selections for their portfolios.

Prerequisites: ACCT 228 Financial Accounting II, ACTG 210 Introduction to Financial Accounting, ACTG 211 Managerial Accounting, BA 100 Survey of Business, BA 340 Corporate Financial Management, ECN 240 Applied Statistics for Economics and Business , MATH 171 Elementary Statistics , Junior Standing; BA 100; BA 340; ECN 240; ACTG 210 or ACCT 228; ACTG 211; MATH 171.

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Business


BA 343 Advanced Value Investing

Credits: 3

An extension of BA 242, Introduction to Value Investing. Advanced analysis of investment portfolio risk management. The stock selection process pioneered and developed by Benjamin Graham and Warren Buffett will be extended to include the analysis of comprehensive portfolios. Competing theories will be introduced for comparative purposes. The extensive use of a stock market simulation game will be a requirement of the course. Upon successful completion of this course a student will be able to apply value investing strategy in portfolio construction; explain how risk is determined and managed in a collection/ portfolio of stocks; describe and perform modern value investing portfolio control (buy-sell) techniques and explain and describe how stocks are bought and sold in an on-line environment.

Prerequisites: ACCT 228 Financial Accounting II, ACTG 210 Introduction to Financial Accounting, BA 242 Introduction to Value Investing, ACTG 210 or ACCT 228, BADM 340; junior standing; BA 242 (introduction to value investing); or permission of the instructor.

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Business


BA 350 Business Information Systems

Credits: 3

A study of the uses of the digital computer in the functional areas of business administration. Major emphasis will be directed to analysis, design and implementation of Management Information Systems. Students successfully completing this course will be able to critically analyze the efficiency and effectiveness of business information systems.

Prerequisites: ACCT 228 Financial Accounting II, ACTG 210 Introduction to Financial Accounting, ACTG 211 Managerial Accounting, BA 100 Survey of Business, Junior standing; BA 100; ACTG 210 or ACCT 228; ACTG 211.

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Business


BA 360 Human Resource Management

Credits: 3

Principles and practices in recruitment, selection, staffing and compensation of personnel. Consideration of the impact of government regulations, and other environmental forces on human resource management in the workplace. Students who successfully complete the course will be able to describe and apply a variety of practical, theory-based solutions to common human resource management problems and challenges.

Prerequisites: BA 100 Survey of Business, BA 310 Principles of Management , ECN 102 Macroeconomics , Junior standing; BA 100; ECN 102; BA 310.

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Business


BA 361 Psychology of Business and Industry

Credits: 3

Psychology as applied to problems of personnel selection and evaluation, prevention of accidents, promotion of work efficiency, morale, advertising, and human factors engineering. At the conclusion of the course, successful students can demonstrate the ability to analyze (from a philosophical and practical viewpoint) how people and the workplace interact; how to maximize the positive relationship between employee and employer; techniques of job and employee assessment; and performance enhancements such as morale, health/safety, motivation technique and group behavior.

Prerequisites: BA 100 Survey of Business, BA 310 Principles of Management , Junior standing; BA 100; BA 310.

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Business


BA 362 Compensation and Benefits

Credits: 3

Examines various rewards systems (including financial) in organizations and studies relevant theoretical and legal perspectives. At the conclusion of the course, the successful student will be able to: identify and describe the federal legislation impact on compensation and benefit plans; explain how an organization’s total compensation system promotes external competitiveness and internal effectiveness; articulate methods of analyzing jobs, evaluating the internal worth of jobs and redesigning positions; determine a cost-effective base pay and incentive pay structure; identify key features of a variety of benefit plans; and analyze strategic issues in designing pay structures, administering benefit plans, containing health-care costs and communicating the system to employees.

Prerequisites: BA 100 Survey of Business, BA 310 Principles of Management , BA 360 Human Resource Management, ECN 102 Macroeconomics , Junior standing; BA 100; BA 310; BA 360; ECN 102.

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Business


BA 370 Operations Management

Credits: 3

Operations management is the study of activities required for the efficient and effective selection of inputs to produce economical and profitable outputs for both manufacturing and service firms. Quantitative solutions derived with the use of a variety of analytical tools will be used. Upon completion of the course, the student will understand production and service systems inputs, processes, and outputs. The student will also gain a further understanding of quantitative solution development in the functional areas of management, marketing, accounting, finance, and human resources management.

Prerequisites: BA 100 Survey of Business, BA 310 Principles of Management , ECN 102 Macroeconomics , ECN 240 Applied Statistics for Economics and Business , MATH 171 Elementary Statistics , Junior standing; BA 100; BA 310; MATH 171; ECN 102; ECN 240

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Business


BA 380 Topics in Business Administration

Credits: Variable

Topics may vary from year to year and will be selected with regard to student demand and judgment of the division.

Prerequisites: Consent of instructor.

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Business


BA 398 Experiential Learning–Practicum

Credits: 3-6

A closely supervised employment experience which allows the student to explore career opportunities in the areas of accounting, business and economics. Allows the student to make practical application of knowledge, skills and abilities imparted/ developed in the classroom. Students successfully completing a practicum will have a clear understanding of the connection between business training and the needs of the business.

Prerequisites: Junior standing and approval of program liaison.

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Business


BA 419 Business Strategy

Credits: 3

This course focuses on the competitive strategy of the firm by examining issues central to the firm’s long- and short-term competitive position. The course develops a set of analytical frameworks that enable students to explain performance differences among firms and that, in turn, provide a structure for making strategic decisions to enhance the firm’s future competitive positions. This course functions as the capstone course for the Accounting and Business Administration majors.

Prerequisites: ACCT 228 Financial Accounting II, ACTG 210 Introduction to Financial Accounting, ACTG 211 Managerial Accounting, BA 100 Survey of Business, BA 310 Principles of Management , BA 320 Principles of Marketing , BA 330 Business Law , BA 340 Corporate Financial Management, BA 350 Business Information Systems, BA 370 Operations Management , ECN 101 Microeconomics , ECN 102 Macroeconomics , ECN 240 Applied Statistics for Economics and Business , MATH 171 Elementary Statistics , PHIL 215 Ethics for Life and Career , Senior Standing; MATH 171; PHIL 215; COMM 255; ECN 101; ECN 102; ECN 240; ACTG 210 or ACCT 228; ACTG 211; BA 100; BA 310; BA 320; BA 330; BA 340; BA 350; BA 370.

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Business


BA 440, 441, 442 Experiential Learning–Career Applications

Credits: 2-6

A Internship option designed to meet the needs of students who are employed full-time and who are seeking career enhancement experiences rather than career initiation skills.

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Business


BA 490 Advanced Readings in Business Administration

Credits: 1-3

An advanced reading course in which the student will read books from a bibliography provided by the instructor. For each credit hour the student must read five books. Grades are based on the student’s analysis of each reading. Written and oral reports will be required. No more than a total of three credit hours will be allowed.

Prerequisites: Senior standing; 3.35 GPA; and consent of advisor and division chairperson.

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Business


BA 497 Independent Study in Business Administration

Credits: 1-3

For seniors with consent of the division chair.

Prerequisites: Senior Standing

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Business


BA 498 Experiential Learning-Internship

Credits: 6-15

An employment/work experience which as closely as possible, represents normal em- ployment/work conditions. The student is afforded the opportunity to apply knowl- edge, skills and abilities imparted/developed in the classroom setting to “real world” business situations.

Prerequisites: Junior standing and approval of program liaison.

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Business


BIO 201 General Botany – Fall

Credits: 4

A course designed to give a basic knowledge of the anatomy and physiology of seed plants for students wishing to continue studies in biology and to give non-biology majors a general appreciation of plants. The relationships between structures and functions of the leaf, stem, root, flower, fruit, and seed are studied. Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to describe the basic principles of botany, the structure and functions of different parts of plants, and to identify certain genera and species.

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Science


BIO 211 General Zoology – Fall

Credits: 4

A survey course, including laboratory, designed to acquaint the student in the fundamental principles of animal life, with emphasis on the structure and function of selected cells, tissues, organs, systems, and organisms. Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to describe basic principles of zoology, the structure and functions of cells and organelles, and the concepts of animal life.

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Science


BIO 241 Human Anatomy and Physiology I – Fall

Credits: 4

This lecture/laboratory course introduces the student to the basic cell processes. It will also cover the anatomy and physiology of the tissues, integumentary, skeletal, muscular, and nervous system. Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to describe the fundamental principles of anatomy and physiology at the chemical, cellular, tissue, organ, system and organismal levels.

Prerequisites: 4 hrs of chemistry

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Nursing, Division of Science, Division of Education, Majors, Exercise Science and Wellness, Health, Physical Education


BIO 242 Human Anatomy and Physiology II – Spring

Credits: 4

This lecture/laboratory course introduces the student to the endocrine, cardiovascular, lymphatic, respiratory, digestive, urinary, and reproductive systems of the human body. Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to demonstrate the anatomical and physiological interrelationships of these systems, and explain the components, structure and functions of the human body.

Prerequisites: BIO 241 Human Anatomy and Physiology I – Fall , BIO 241

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Science


BIO 260 Ecology and Conservation

Credits: 4

A lecture, laboratory, and field study of ecological principles as they apply to plant and animal interrelationships in their environment. Natural systems analysis and natural resource conservation are studied. Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to demonstrate a knowledge of the basic concepts and applications of conservation.

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Science


BIO 300 Ecosystem Studies

Credits: 1-2

Intensive studies of natural areas and their inhabitants with emphasis on the development and functioning of specific ecosystems. Taxonomic, anatomical and physiological information will be presented through lectures, laboratory work and Internships. The specific ecosystems will be selected with regard to student demand and faculty availability. Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to analyze and characterize specific ecosystems. May be repeated for different systems.

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Science


BIO 302 Plant Morphology

Credits: 4

A lecture and laboratory course designed to acquaint the student with morphological and ecological relationships of representative members of the plant kingdom. Morphogenesis and evolutionary trends are emphasized. Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to describe in depth the morphology and evolution of plants.

Prerequisites: BIO 201 General Botany – Fall , BIO 201

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Science


BIO 312 Animal Development and Diversity

Credits: 4

A lecture and laboratory course designed to acquaint the student with the anatomical and ecological diversity of the animal kingdom. Comparative life cycles of representative members of the major animal groups are studied. Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to describe various life cycles, anatomy, and evolution of animals.

Prerequisites: BIO 211 General Zoology – Fall, BIO 211

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Science


BIO 324 Taxonomy of Flora and Fauna

Credits: 4

A lecture, laboratory, and field study of the classification, nomenclature, identification, and documentation of plants and animals. Specific flora and fauna will vary. Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to identify and classify plants and animal using taxonomic keys.

Prerequisites: BIO 201 or 211 or 260 or consent of instructor

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Science


BIO 350 Microbiology – Spring

Credits: 4

An introductory course dealing primarily with the biology of bacteria, although other microorganisms are also studied. The importance of beneficial as well as disease- causing microorganisms is presented. Laboratory techniques for culturing and nutritional differentiation are studied and performed. Students will be able to isolate, culture, and identify various microorganisms.

Prerequisites: 8 hours of biology, 4 hours of chemistry

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Science


BIO 355 Genetics – Fall

Credits: 4

An introductory course dealing with the principles of plant and animal inheritance. A basic study of the molecular structure and function of genetic material (DNA and RNA); basic cytology; and developmental, behavioral, and human genetics. Sex determination, linkage, chromosomal recombination, and recent discoveries and techniques in biotechnology are studied. Upon completion of this course, students will be able to demonstrate their understanding of the basic concepts of inheritance, the structure of DNA, and their ability to perform techniques such as PCR and electrophoresis.

Prerequisites: MATH 171 Elementary Statistics , 8 hrs. of biology, 8 hrs. of chemistry, MATH 171

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Science


BIO 360 Cell and Molecular Biology

Credits: 4

This course presents a systematic approach to concepts of cell and molecular biology with an emphasis on the biological and chemical processes that occur in the cell and how these are related to cell function. Students will understand these underlying principles and analyze the current scientific research that has led to the current view of the cell.

Prerequisites: BIO 211 General Zoology – Fall, CHEM 175 Principles of Chemistry I – Fall , CHEM 176 Principles of Chemistry II – Spring , BIO 211, CHEM 175 and CHEM 176

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Science


BIO 380 Topics in Biology

Credits: 1-4

This will be an intensive study of a selected topic and may include laboratory and/ or field work. The specific topics will be selected with regard for student needs and interests of the faculty. Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to collect information on a specific topic in biology, compose a document to demonstrate scientific writings skills, and demonstrate the knowledge related to the topic studied. May be repeated for different topics. No more than six hours will be counted toward the major unless otherwise recommended by the Division chairperson.

Prerequisites: 8 hours of biology or consent of the instructor. Not offered on a regular basis

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Science


BIO 386 Biochemistry

Credits: 4

An introductory lecture course. Topics include nomenclature, typical reactions, qualitative and quantitative analysis, and intermediary metabolism. Particular emphasis will be given to factors effecting enzyme kinetics and metabolic control. Students successfully completing this course will become familiar the general structure of prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells, will acquire knowledge of the various classes of bio-organic compounds and their roles in cellular metabolism, and will learn the general metabolic pathways found in cells and multicellular organisms.

Prerequisites: BIO 201 General Botany – Fall , BIO 211 General Zoology – Fall, CHEM 355 Organic Chemistry I (with lab) – Fall, BIO 201 or 211; CHEM 355 or consent of the instructor. Offered even numbered Springs

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Science


BIO 398 Practicum in Biology

Credits: 2

This practicum allows for practical work experience on campus in biology. Specific guidelines, which include prerequisites, and application procedures, may be obtained from the Division chairperson. Each student’s individual Practicum must be approved by the Division before the student begins the practicum or registers. Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to demonstrate preparation for entry and success in biology.

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Science


BIO 440, 441, 442 Career Applications

Credits: 2-6

The Career Applications allows for practical work experience or research training for those students whose class schedule, course load or program design does not permit them to complete the Internship in one term. Specific guidelines, which include prerequisites and application procedures, may be obtained from the Division chairperson. Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to demonstrate preparation for entry and success in science related graduate and professional schools, industry, or laboratory and field programs, or teaching.

Prerequisites: Senior standing in the major

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Science


BIO 497 Independent Study in Biology

Credits: 1-3

Original investigation of special problems. Open to juniors and seniors whose general ability and training in biology make probable their success with a research problem. Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to perform scientific investigations and interpret scientific data. (See also Independent Study in the index.)

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Science


BIO 498 Internship in Biology

Credits: 6-12

This internship allows for practical work experience in biology. Specific guidelines, which include prerequisites and application procedures, may be obtained from the Division chairperson. Each student’s individual internship must be approved by the Division before the student registers for or begins the internship. Upon successful completion, students will be able to describe their work experience in connection to their biology coursework, and express in writing what they learned in their field placement.

Prerequisites: Senior standing in the major

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Science


BIO 498 Internship in Biology

Credits: 6-12

This internship allows for practical work experience in biology. Specific guidelines, which include prerequisites and application procedures, may be obtained from the Division chairperson. Each student’s individual internship must be approved by the Division before the student registers for or begins the internship. Upon successful completion, students will be able to describe their work experience in connection to their biology coursework, and express in writing what they learned in their field placement.

Prerequisites: Senior standing in the major

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Science


BIO 499A Biology Seminar I

Credits: 1

This course will involve student research on an approved Biology topic. Techniques of biological research, scientific writing, editing of scientific writing, and formal presentation of results will be discussed and analyzed. Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to compose a professional document designed to disseminate a scientific report using proper format and style

Prerequisites: Primarily for juniors and seniors in the major but open to others with consent of the instructor

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Science


BIO 499B Biology Seminar II

Credits: 1

This course will involve a formal oral presentation of Biology research and techniques of critiquing oral and written scientific works. Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to present the information from Biology Seminar I in a professional and persuasive manner in both thesis form and as a journal article. Must be taken consecutively with Biology Seminar I.

Prerequisites: Primarily for juniors and seniors in the major but open to others with consent of the instructor

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Science


CHEM 105 General Chemistry I – Spring

Credits: 4

This course is an introduction into the general topics of inorganic chemistry. Topics include atomic structure, chemical bonds, mole relationships, states of matter, acids and bases, reaction rates, equilibria, electrochemistry, and nuclear chemistry.

Prerequisites: High school algebra

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Science


CHEM 175 Principles of Chemistry I – Fall

Credits: 4

A mathematically based introductory course in chemistry. Topics include atomic and molecular structure, chemical relationships, quantitative relationships, and gas theories. Laboratory will emphasize concepts covered in lecture. Upon successful completion, students will be able to solve qualitative and quantitative problems involving stoichiometric relationships, will have an understanding of kinetic molecular theory and how it applies to the behavior of gases, and will possess the basic conceptual vocabulary necessary to understand chemical information.

Prerequisites: Concurrent enrollment Math 162 or higher, or consent of instructor

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Science


CHEM 176 Principles of Chemistry II – Spring

Credits: 4

This course is a continuation of CHEM 175. Topics include kinetics, equilibria, acid-base concepts, electrochemistry and nuclear chemistry. Students successfully completing this course will have an understanding of current and historical acid-base theory and how it is applied experimentally, an understanding of the basic concepts governing the rates of chemical reactions, and an understanding of both qualitative and quantitative approaches to chemical equilibria.

Prerequisites: CHEM 175

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Science


CHEM 271 Quantitative Analysis – Fall

Credits: 4

Primarily a laboratory course stressing precision and technique. Wet chemical methods of analysis will be used to illustrate precipitation reactions, complexation, acid/base and redox chemistry. The class work will stress solution equilibria. Students successfully completing this course will become proficient in the laboratory techniques used for wet chemical analysis and the underlying concepts behind them.

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Science


CHEM 300 Environmental Chemistry

Credits: 4

See EVHL 300

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Science


CHEM 355 Organic Chemistry I (with lab) – Fall

Credits: 4

This introductory survey course is centered around structure and is organized by functional groups. Nomenclature, properties, preparations, and reactions of the various groups will be studied. Students successfully completing this course will gain a knowledge of the standard approaches to organic chemical nomenclature, will become familiar with basic methods for determining and writing organic reaction mechanisms, including an understanding of electron-pushing, and will begin learning some of the reactions and reagents useful for organic chemical transformations and synthesis. Laboratory techniques and basic reactions of organic compounds will be stressed. Students successfully completing this course will become proficient in typical methods of organic chemical isolation and purification, including liquid-liquid extraction, distillation, and recrystallization.

Prerequisites: CHEM 176

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Science


CHEM 356 Organic Chemistry II (with lab) – Spring

Credits: 4

An extension and expansion of CHEM 355. The central themes will be reaction mechanism and structure. Infrared, ultraviolet, and NMR spectroscopy will be explored as tools in structural determination. Students successfully completing this course will broaden their knowledge of organic chemical transformations, and will become proficient in interpreting organic spectra. Lab inclusion of instrumental methods of studying molecules and reactions. Reaction mechanisms will play an important role. A major multi-step synthesis is a culminating activity. Students successfully completing this course will become familiar with performing multi-step synthetic reactions on the micro and macroscale, and will gain hands on knowledge of NMR, IR, and UV spectroscopy.

Prerequisites: CHEM 355

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Science


CHEM 380 Topics in Chemistry

Credits: 1-4

The course will be an intensive study of a selected topic and may include laboratory work. The specific topics will be selected with regard for student need and interests of the faculty. May be repeated for different topics. No more than six hours will be counted toward the major unless recommended by the Division chairperson.

Prerequisites: 8 hours of college chemistry and permission of the instructor

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Science


CHEM 497 Independent Study in Chemistry

Credits: 1-3

This course will give students of demonstrated ability an opportunity to make an independent study of some selected topic under close supervision. Prerequisites: 16 hours of chemistry and consent of the chemistry faculty.

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Science


CJ 231 Introduction to Criminal Justice

Credits: 3

A survey of the major components of the criminal justice system including the police, courts, and corrections. Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to describe the American criminal justice structure and functions, distinguish between consensus and conflict models of the criminal justice system and explain the meaning of due process and equal protection under the law.

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Science


CJ 260 Criminal Law and Individual Rights

Credits: 3

This course covers substantive criminal law and criminal procedure. Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to articulate the origins of criminal law; identify the elements of various types of crime and defenses to criminal acts; and discuss constitutional protections related to search and seizure, due process, double- jeopardy, rights against self-incrimination, rights to an attorney, rights to a jury trial and court decisions on cruel and unusual punishments

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Science


CJ 307 Criminology

Credits: 3

A scientific study of crime and criminal behavior based on classical, neoclassical, positivistic, social process, and structural theories of crime causation. Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to discuss the development of sociological criminology, critically analyze theoretical explanations for crime and articulate research findings on crime.

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Science


CJ 308 Juvenile Delinquency

Credits: 3

This course covers the special problems and laws pertaining to juvenile offenders. Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to distinguish between status offenses and criminal acts, articulate the problem of juvenile crime and justice, and discuss the legal framework for handling and rehabilitating juvenile delinquents.

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Science


CJ 316 Introduction to Corrections

Credits: 3

An overview of the history and contemporary development of the field of corrections. Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to articulate philosophies of punishment, discuss correctional law and inmate rights, and evaluate correctional programs to rehabilitate correctional clients.

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Science


CJ 322 Probation and Parole

Credits: 3

A study of contemporary practices related to probation and parole with emphasis on community corrections as an alternative to incarceration. Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to explain the difference between probation and parole, discuss the legal framework for probation and parole supervision, and describe the job of probation and parole officers.

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Science


CJ 330 Criminal Courts

Credits: 3

This course will examine the philosophical and constitutional assumptions underlying the American criminal court system of justice. Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to articulate issues and controversies related to the law and crime, explain how the criminal court process works; and discuss the impact that criminal cases have on society as a whole.

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Science


CJ 347 Research Methods

Credits: 3

See SSCI 347 under Psychology course listings

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Science


CJ 355 Law Enforcement

Credits: 3

A comprehensive study of federal, state, and local law enforcement agencies. Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to articulate methods, problems, issues, and challenges of police work; explain the rule of law as it applies to probable cause for arrest, Miranda rights, search and seizure, and the questioning of criminal suspects; and discuss the civil liabilities for civil rights violations and police misconduct.

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Science


CJ 370 Multiculturalism in Criminal Justice

Credits: 3

This course covers the impact of cultural factors on the field of criminal justice with emphasis on the interaction between criminal justice practitioners and members of minority communities. Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to critically analyze the effect of race and ethnicity on crime, articulate gender and ethnic issues in criminal justice agencies, and discuss majority and minority views on the fairness of the criminal justice system

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Science


CJ 380 Topics in Criminal Justice

Credits: 3

Selected topics in the area of criminal justice. This course will give students the op- portunity to study in-depth a particular topic beyond what is covered in existing courses. Course offerings will depend upon student and faculty interest and faculty availability.

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Science


CJ 385 Terrorism and Homeland Security

Credits: 3

A study of how the United States government has responded to the threat of terrorism on American soil since the September 11th attacks. The role of federal, state, and local law enforcement agencies in defending the homeland are discussed. Upon completion of this course, students will be able to identify foreign terrorist groups and goals, discuss the various laws and antiterrorism programs that have been adopted to protect the United States from future attacks, and critically examine the rule of law in prosecuting foreign terrorists.

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Science


CJ 398 Practicum in Criminal Justice

Credits: 3

This practicum permits practical work experience on campus in criminal justice. Specific guidelines, which include perquisites and application procedures, may be obtained from the Science chair.

Prerequisites: Unanimous approval by the Science Division before the student begins the practicum or registers.

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Science


CJ 416 Crime and Punishment

Credits: 3

An advanced study of classical and modern theories of penology with emphasis on contemporary issues related to crime and punishment. Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to discuss and critically analyze the development of penology as a field of study, articulate philosophical views of punishment, and apply criminal and correctional law to individual rights and public order.

Prerequisites: CJ 307, CJ 316 or consent of instructor

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Science


CJ 425 Criminal Justice Administration

Credits: 3

An analysis of the management and supervision practices of top administrators, mid-level managers, and first-line supervisors in criminal justice agencies. Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to describe and discuss the organizational structure, policies, procedures, rules and regulations, and everyday work practices of criminal justice agencies.

Prerequisites: CJ 231 or consent of the instructor

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Science


CJ 440, 441, 442 Career Applications in Criminal Justice

Credits: 2-6

This course permits practical work experience in criminal justice for students who are unable to complete six hours of internship in a single semester due to class schedule or course load. The number of hours needed to complete credit hours in Career Applications will be the same as those required to complete Internship credit hours. The difference is that Career Applications will spread the work over more weeks.

Prerequisites: Junior of senior standing and unanimous approval of the Science Division

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Science


CJ 497 Independent Study in Criminal Justice

Credits: 3

An in-depth study into a specific area of criminal justice. Periodic conferences with the instructor and written documentation of the area of study are required.

Prerequisites: Consent of the instructor

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Science


CJ 498 Internship in Criminal Justice

Credits: 6-12

The internship allows for practical work experience in criminal justice. This course is required for criminal justice majors. Upon successful completion of the internship, students will be able to describe their work experience, connect their work experience to their criminal justice coursework, and articulate orally and in writing what they learned in their field placement.

Prerequisites: Junior or senior standing

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Science


CJ 499 Seminar in Behavioral Science

Credits: 3

Seminar in Behavioral Science

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Science


COMM 147 Introduction to Public Speaking

Credits: 3

This course focuses on the development of effective presentational skills through the performance of various speeches and interpretative performances of literature. Students successfully completing this course will understand and be able to apply public speaking knowledge, including audience analysis, exigency analysis, critical and interpretive analysis of content, organization of content in appropriate presentational formats, presentational skills, and the linguistic requirements of effective public speaking

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Humanities, Endorsements, K-8 English/Language Arts


COMM 380 Special Topics in Communication

Credits: 3

This course will give students the opportunity to study in-depth a particular topic beyond what is covered in existing Communication courses. Topics vary year by year, and this course may be repeated for different topics. No more than six hours will be counted toward the major unless approved in advance by the Division chairperson.

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Humanities


COMM 497 Independent Study in Communication

Credits: 1-3

This course is designed for advanced students who wish to research and write a paper on a specific topic or do a special project in communication.

Prerequisites: Advanced standing, a written project proposal, and permission of division chair.

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Humanities


CS 201 Computer Programming I – Fall

Credits: 4

An introduction to the fundamental ideas, techniques, and concepts of computer science and programming. Topics will include algorithms development, variables, sequence, selection, repetition, arrays, and functions. Students satisfactorily completing this course will be able to write and debug code in a programming language.

Prerequisites: Math 162 College Algebra and Trigonometry

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Science


CS 380 Topics in Computer Science

Credits: 3

An intensive study of a topic. The topic selected will depend on student needs and interests, staff interests, and the judgment of the Computer Science faculty. Possible topics include: assembly language programming, modeling and simulation, computer graphics, microprocessor instrumentation and control, and computer assisted instruction. No more than six hours will be counted toward the major unless recommended by the Division chairperson.

Prerequisites: CS 201, 202, 233 or consent of instructor

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Science


CS 497 Independent Study in Computer Science

Credits: 3

This course will give students of demonstrated ability an opportunity to make an independent study of some topic under close supervision. See also Independent Study in the Index.

Prerequisites: 12 hours of computer science

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Science


ECN 101 Microeconomics

Credits: 3

Topics in this course include the behavior of individual households and firms, supply and demand analysis, and the various structures of a market economy. Students successfully completing this course will be able to identify and explain the major economic forces faced by a single firm in a capitalistic setting.

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Economics


ECN 102 Macroeconomics

Credits: 3

This course is designed for the general student as well as for the student considering further study in business administration, accounting or economics. This course develops basic economic theory to explain unemployment, inflation and economic growth and considers the role of governmental economic stabilization policy. Students successfully completing this course will be able to identify and explain the major economic forces faced by groups of firms in a capitalistic setting.

Prerequisites: ECN 101

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Economics


ECN 240 Applied Statistics for Economics and Business

Credits: 3

Statistical methods commonly used in the analysis of empirical data are considered, including descriptive and inferential statistics, and parametric and nonparametric techniques. Computer applications and the relationship between statistics and research design are emphasized in relation to business & economics problems. Students successfully completing this course will be able to perform the statistical analysis portion of a college research project.

Prerequisites: Sophomore standing; BA 100; MATH 171

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Economics


ECN 321 Economics of Labor Relations

Credits: 3

The labor market and its relation to the overall economy; the development, structure, goals and policies of labor organizations; major issues in labor-management relations; problems of public policy, wage theories and wage determination. Successful completion of this course will enable students to identify and describe the major issues in labor and their relationship to overall economic conditions.

Prerequisites: Junior standing; BA 100; ECN 101; ECN 102

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Economics


ECN 322 Money and Banking

Credits: 3

Essentials of commercial and central banking, monetary policy and theory: A study of how the central banking system controls the money supply; conducts monetary policy through the different tools they have available. The course will include several of the theoretical approaches that have been developed since the beginning of modern capitalism and the need for modern money emerged. Successful completion of this course will enable students to describe the major monetary strategies of government and business.

Prerequisites: Junior standing; BA 100; ECN 101; ECN 102

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Economics


ECN 330 History of Economic Thought

Credits: 3

This course will follow the development of Economics from Adam Smith through John Maynard Keynes. The development will be traced through the study of the authors who contributed to the profession’s development. Students successfully completing this course will be able to compare and contrast the major theories of economics since 1776.

Prerequisites: Junior standing; BA 100; ECN 101; ECN 102

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Economics


ECN 341 Research Methods for Economics and Business

Credits: 3

The course includes discussion and study of various research methods, research design and treatment of data for use in economic, financial and marketing studies that are intended to apply or test various theoretical positions in these business disciplines. Participation in a research project is required. Students successfully completing this course will be able to design and conduct a college-level research project.

Prerequisites: Junior standing; BA 100; MATH 171

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Economics


ECN 350 Economics of International Business

Credits: 3

An introduction to international economic problems and public policy responses. The course includes discussions of tariffs, quotas, exchange rate control, the balance of payments, international capital and labor movements, and policies designed to encourage international economic stability and cooperation. Students successfully completing this course will be able to define and explain the major economic forces of the modern global business environment.

Prerequisites: Junior standing; BA 100; ECN 101; ECN 102

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Economics


ECN 351 International Economic Development

Credits: 3

An introduction to theories and approaches to development of the non-industrialized countries. With a policy and strategy orientation, the course will examine the contemporary issues of development from the perspective of increasing globalization and international interdependence. Students successfully completing this course will be able to identify and describe the major forces shaping the development of less- developed countries

Prerequisites: Senior standing; BA 100; ECN 101; ECN 102; ECN 350

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Economics


ECN 380 Topics in Economics

Credits: 3

Selected topics in the economics area.

Prerequisites: ECN 101; ECN 102 and consent of instructor

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Economics


ECN 398 Experiential Learning–Practicum

Credits: 3-6

A closely supervised employment experience which allows the student to explore career opportunities in the areas of accounting, business and economics. Allows the student to make a limited application of knowledge, skills and abilities imparted/ developed in the classroom. Students successfully completing practicum will be able to compare and contrast economic theory with practical applications.

Prerequisites: Junior standing and approval of program liaison

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Economics


ECN 440, 441, 442 Experiential Learning–Career Applications

Credits: 2-6

An Internship option designed to meet the needs of students who are employed full-time and who are seeking career enhancement experiences rather than career initiation skills. Students desiring to register in this course must obtain the approval of the faculty of the Division of Business.

Prerequisites: Junior standing and approval of divisional liaison

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Economics


ECN 498 Experiential Learning–Internship

Credits: 6-15

An employment/work experience, which as closely as possible, represents normal employment/work conditions. The student is afforded the opportunity to apply knowledge, skills and abilities imparted/developed in the classroom setting to “real world” business situations. Students successfully completing an internship will be able to compare and contrast economic theory and practical applications.

Prerequisites: Senior standing and approval of program liaison

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Economics


EDUC 110 Introduction to Teacher Education

Credits: 1

This course will help students understand various requirements of the Teacher Education Program (TEP) and the State of Iowa for teacher certification. Students will become familiar with the mission and conceptual framework of the TEP as it fits within the Iowa Wesleyan University philosophy. Student will also demonstrate the acquisition of knowledge about and skill in use of the InTASC Standards/Working Portfolio and electronic formats for instruction (Edmodo) and assessment (LiveText). . Freshmen education students should take this course in their second semester on campus and transfer students should take this course during their first semester on campus.

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Education, Majors, Early Childhood Education, Educational Foundations, Elementary Education, Physical Education, Endorsements, Athletic Coaching, Reading, Early Childhood Education, Health, Instructional Strategist I: Mild & Moderate, K-8 English/Language Arts, K-8 Science, K-8 Social Studies, Music, Physical Education


EDUC 215 Technological Applications in the Classroom K–12

Credits: 2

Students plan and implement strategies for integrating technology into the school curriculum. Students develop lesson plans and sample projects which simulate elementary/secondary students’ use of technology to solve problems or present results, helping to prepare them for the adult work world.

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Education, Majors, Educational Foundations, Elementary Education, Physical Education, Endorsements, Music, Physical Education


EDUC 261 Early Experience in the Schools

Credits: 1

A required 30 hours of supervised experiences within the PK-12 classroom prior to provisional admission to the teacher education program. Placement is done through the Education Division. Students explore teaching as a career. Students assist the classroom teacher with individual and small groups of students, and analyze how their observations address selected standards of the teacher education department goals.

Prerequisites: Should be taken in freshman or sophomore year. Must have successful background check on file.

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Education, Majors, Early Childhood Education, Elementary Education, Physical Education, Endorsements, K-8 English/Language Arts, K-8 Science, K-8 Social Studies, Music, Physical Education


EDUC 262 Participation and Analysis in the Schools

Credits: 1

An organized participation in the schools requiring 30 hours of supervised experiences within the PK-12 classroom. Placement is done through the Education Division. Students design and teach at least three short lessons, assist the classroom teacher with individual and small groups of students, and analyze how their observations address selected standards of the teacher education department goals. Must have successful background check on file.

Prerequisites: EDUC 261; 2.5 GPA; and passed 2 modules of a basic skills test. Intended to be taken in conjunction with a methods course.

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Education, Majors, Early Childhood Education, Elementary Education, Endorsements, K-8 English/Language Arts, K-8 Science, K-8 Social Studies, Music, Physical Education


EDUC 263 Participation and Analysis in the Schools

Credits: 1

EDUC 263 is the third of three sequenced early field experiences for the teacher education program. The expectation is that each teacher candidate receives a wide variety of placements as they move from 261, 262, and 263 to finishing with the student teaching course. Students can request the opportunity to work with specific teachers or in specific districts, but the Field Experience Committee will be responsible for all initial contacts with the school administrators to arrange for placement. This phase of the Participation and Analysis will emphasize the management of the classroom as a whole and focus on learning environment issues. The teacher candidate will prepare and present, and then gather cooperating teacher feedback on three whole group lessons; will examine school-wide and classroom management; and will present findings to 261 and 262 students.

Prerequisites: EDUC 262; 2.75 GPA; and passed all modules of a basic skills test. Must have successful background check on file.

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Education, Majors, Early Childhood Education, Elementary Education, Endorsements, K-8 English/Language Arts, K-8 Science, K-8 Social Studies, Music, Physical Education


EDUC 268 Care and Development of the Preschool Child

Credits: 3

Students learn about the study of prenatal and postnatal development to age 8. Students gain knowledge about children’s physical and social needs and their place in the family.

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Education, Majors, Early Childhood Education


EDUC 279 Introduction to Early Childhood Education

Credits: 3

Students examine the field of early Childhood education, emphasizing the philosophy, history, current trends and principles of guidance of the young child.

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Education, Majors, Early Childhood Education


EDUC 294 Foundations of Education

Credits: 2

Students examine the history of education and the influence that politics, economics, social class, gender, ethnicity, religion, and race have on American public education(K-12). Students analyze the role that these and other socio-cultural issues have on education at the federal, state, and local levels.

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Education, Majors, Early Childhood Education, Elementary Education, Endorsements, K-8 English/Language Arts, K-8 Science, K-8 Social Studies, Music, Physical Education


EDUC 295 Curriculum Development and Evaluation

Credits: 3

Students will gain information about the development of elementary and secondary curriculum; definitions, learning theories, implementation and assessment strategies, and classroom management. Students will apply the information learned in the development of a curriculum project.

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Education, Majors, Elementary Education, Endorsements, K-8 English/Language Arts, K-8 Science, K-8 Social Studies, Music, Physical Education


EDUC 296 Educational Psychology

Credits: 3

Students examine the principles and theories of psychology as they relate to human learning and assessment in education. Students acquire background information about multiple theories of human development; different approaches to cognition and educational research; and various teaching strategies and assessment for traditional and exceptional, handicapped, and gifted and talented students. Students design and score a variety of test formats including multiple choice, essay and portfolio assessment. Students comprehend the processes of instructional design, motivation, classroom management, discipline, measurement and evaluation and understand strategies to meet the unique needs of the “at risk” and special needs student.

Prerequisites: A general psychology course is recommended.

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Education, Majors, Early Childhood Education, Educational Foundations, Elementary Education, Exercise Science and Wellness, Physical Education, Endorsements, Athletic Coaching, Reading, K-8 English/Language Arts


EDUC 301 Education of Exceptional Persons

Credits: 3

A basic study of exceptionality in children and youth, including the emotionally disturbed, disadvantaged, mentally retarded, gifted, physically handicapped and those with learning disabilities including characteristics, methods of identification, curriculum development, research and current educational structures and practices. Students will observe special education students in a variety of appropriate settings and will learn to make modifications and accommodations appropriate to their area of certification.

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Education, Majors, Early Childhood Education, Educational Foundations, Elementary Education, Exercise Science and Wellness, Physical Education, Endorsements, Athletic Coaching, Reading, Early Childhood Education, Health, Instructional Strategist I: Mild & Moderate, K-8 English/Language Arts, K-8 Science, K-8 Social Studies, Music, Physical Education


EDUC 302 Classroom Management

Credits: 2

This course addresses the learning of classroom management techniques that focus upon a well-organized, structured yet flexible, warm and caring environment in which children and youth will grow both intellectually and socially. In this course, students study various theoretically-based management models, learn how to analyze behavior problems, and create a final project that is a synthesis of the information learned as it relates to their areas of certification. An overarching goal of this course is for students to determine their own theory and practices of behavior management to be used once working professionally. By the end of this term students should have a good collection of ideas, strategies, and interventions for building positive learning environments and proactively addressing problematic behaviors in the classroom and other school settings.

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Education, Majors, Early Childhood Education, Educational Foundations, Elementary Education, Exercise Science and Wellness, Physical Education, Endorsements, Athletic Coaching, Reading, Early Childhood Education, Health, Instructional Strategist I: Mild & Moderate, K-8 English/Language Arts, K-8 Science, K-8 Social Studies, Music, Physical Education


EDUC 305 Elementary School Science Methods

Credits: 3

The purpose of this required course is to provide students with foundations in science education using meaningful and practical learning experiences in order to prepare them to create an effective science learning environment for elementary students. The three areas of strength for science programs, 1) science content, 2) science process skills, and 3) positive attitude toward science, will be addressed experientially in this course. Students will be immersed in learner-centered methods to help students understand appropriate instructional strategies for elementary school science experiences.

Prerequisites: EDUC 110, 294, 295, & 296

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Education, Majors, Elementary Education


EDUC 323 Elementary School Math Methods

Credits: 3

During this required course students will engage in five overreaching arenas of study: mathematics, problem solving, classroom climate, assessment, and professional development. These arenas will be integrated through activities and projects, readings and discussions, and lesson planning. The course is designed to assist students in gaining experience with mathematics, and experience research based methods that may be carried further into their practice.

Prerequisites: Math 150, EDUC 110, 294, 295, & 296.

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Education, Majors, Elementary Education


EDUC 324 Primary Literacy Methods

Credits: 3

The purpose of this course is for students to discern and discuss theories relating to language development from birth through the primary years of school and the teacher’s role in that development. Students will examine methodology, language processes, and learning strategies in the areas of phonemic awareness, phonics, vocabulary, fluency, comprehension, spelling, and writing. Students will demonstrate an understanding of the components to a comprehensive literacy program. This is the first course in the sequence of courses needed for the reading endorsement.

Prerequisites: to: EDUC 110, 342, EDUC 294, 295, & 296

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Education, Majors, Early Childhood Education, Elementary Education, Endorsements, Reading


EDUC 327 Reading in the Secondary Content Areas Methods

Credits: 2

Integration of reading strategies into secondary content areas and application of current research, effective methodology, strategies and materials for teaching middle and high school reading. Assessment tools and procedures explored. Field experience requirement.

Prerequisites: EDUC 110, 294, 295, & 296

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Education, Majors, Endorsements, Reading, Early Childhood Education, Health, Instructional Strategist I: Mild & Moderate, K-8 English/Language Arts, K-8 Science, K-8 Social Studies, Music, Physical Education


EDUC 331 Elementary School Social Studies Methods

Credits: 2

Presents methods and materials for teaching the content of the social studies in the elementary school.

Prerequisites: EDUC 110 Introduction to Teacher Education, EDUC 294 Foundations of Education, EDUC 295 Curriculum Development and Evaluation, EDUC 296 Educational Psychology, EDUC 110, 294, 295, & 296

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Education, Majors, Elementary Education


EDUC 332 Elementary School P.E. and Health Methods & Curriculu

Credits: 3

Students examine the philosophy, objectives, principles, assessment, curriculum, and activities related to the teaching of health and physical education in the elementary schools. This course is designed for the physical education major.

Prerequisites: EDUC 110 Introduction to Teacher Education, EDUC 294 Foundations of Education, EDUC 296 Educational Psychology, PE 290 Curriculum Instruction & Design PE K-12, EDUC 110, 294, 296, & PE 290

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Education, Physical Education, Endorsements, Health, Physical Education


EDUC 338 Children’s Literature

Credits: 2

Students explore the various genres of children’s literature appropriate for children from kindergarten to grade 6. Students increase their understanding of how language develops through use of literature. Students examine literary elements and analyze the quality of a book. Students learn to embed good literature into content areas of learning in addition to practicing teaching methods to story comprehension and appreciation. Students experience storytelling, story reading and poetry recitation.

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Education, Majors, Early Childhood Education, Elementary Education, Endorsements, Reading


EDUC 342 Intermediate Literacy Methods

Credits: 3

Students will learn methodology relating to language processes and strategies for intermediate students’ acquisition and fluent expression of language. Students will gain knowledge in the intellectual, social, emotional, and physical developmental needs that impact intermediate age students’ literacy skills. Students not only increase their knowledge about the language skills learned in the primary grades, but improve their understanding on vocabulary development, comprehension, and critical thinking skills. Students will be able to conduct authentic assessment and implement reading in the content areas.

Prerequisites: EDUC 110 Introduction to Teacher Education, EDUC 294 Foundations of Education, EDUC 295 Curriculum Development and Evaluation, EDUC 296 Educational Psychology, EDUC 324 Primary Literacy Methods, EDUC 110, 294, 295, & 296 & 324

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Education, Majors, Elementary Education, Endorsements, Reading


EDUC 348 Readings in Literature for Adolescents

Credits: 3

Provides opportunity for extensive reading in literature for adolescents and introduces students to individualized reading programs as they are conducted in public schools. Students will read and annotate more than 30 books, noting literary qualities and developmental tasks and gauging appropriate grade-level.

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Education, Majors


EDUC 355 Methods and Materials for Early Childhood Education

Credits: 3

Students will learn methods and principles of development and operation of programs for young children, including involvement with parents. Students gain experience in activities for the care and development of the young child including education for the physical, mental and social development of the preschool child.

Prerequisites: EDUC 110 Introduction to Teacher Education, EDUC 268 Care and Development of the Preschool Child, EDUC 279 Introduction to Early Childhood Education, EDUC 294 Foundations of Education, EDUC 296 Educational Psychology, EDUC 110, 268, 279, 294, and 296

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Education, Majors, Early Childhood Education


EDUC 357 Human Relations: Global Perspective for Educators

Credits: 2-3

Students will understand the values, life styles, history, and contributions of various identifiable subgroups in our society. Students will recognize dehumanizing biases such as sexism, racism, prejudice, and discrimination, in instructional materials and in daily interactions of members of society. They will become aware of the impact that such biases have on interpersonal relations and learning. Students will translate knowledge of human relations into attitudes, skills, and techniques which will result in favorable learning experiences for students. Students will learn to respect human diversity and the rights of each individual. This course satisfies the Global Awareness course for Wesleyan Studies.

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Education, Majors, Early Childhood Education, Educational Foundations, Elementary Education, Exercise Science and Wellness, Physical Education, Endorsements, Athletic Coaching, Reading, Early Childhood Education, Health, Instructional Strategist I: Mild & Moderate, K-8 English/Language Arts, K-8 Science, K-8 Social Studies, Music, Physical Education


EDUC 382 Modern English Grammars

Credits: 3

Explores structure of modern English. Students will analyze English sentences, determine the constituents of a well-made sentence, and identify the form and function of words and phrases. Students will also apply grammatical concepts to classroom situations.

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Education, Majors, Endorsements, K-8 English/Language Arts


EDUC 390 Elementary Specials Methods: Art, Music, and Physical Education/Health/Wellnes

Credits: 3

The purpose of this course is to instruct general education students in areas of art, music, and physical education/health/wellness to integrate into their subject areas. It will also be of value in preparing future teachers for a job opportunity in a district without specials in one or all of these areas. Learning Outcomes: Students will become familiar with philosophy, national standards, objectives, principles, and activities relating to the teaching of art, music, and physical education/health/wellness activities to enrich social studies, science, math, and language arts content.

Prerequisites: EDUC 110 Introduction to Teacher Education, EDUC 294 Foundations of Education, EDUC 295 Curriculum Development and Evaluation, EDUC 296 Educational Psychology, EDUC 110, 294, 295 & 296

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Education, Majors, Early Childhood Education, Elementary Education


EDUC 396 H, I, K and L Secondary School Methods

Credits: 3 each

A special methods course designed for each of the areas of secondary education. The student will examine methods of organization, presentation of materials, evaluation techniques and classroom management.

Prerequisites: EDUC 110 Introduction to Teacher Education, EDUC 294 Foundations of Education, EDUC 296 Educational Psychology

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Education, Majors, Endorsements, Health, K-8 English/Language Arts, K-8 Science, K-8 Social Studies, Music, Physical Education


EDUC 396H Secondary School Special Methods, Major: Health & Curriculum

Credits: 3

Students will learn techniques to use in teaching health in the secondary school. They will write lesson plans and teach in the secondary setting and be evaluated by the instructor.

Prerequisites: EDUC 110 Introduction to Teacher Education, EDUC 294 Foundations of Education, EDUC 296 Educational Psychology, PE 290 Curriculum Instruction & Design PE K-12, EDUC 110, 294, 296 & PE 290

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Education, Majors, Endorsements, Health, Physical Education


EDUC 396I Secondary School Special Methods, Major: Industrial Technology

Credits: 3

Students will learn techniques to use in teaching industrial technology in the secondary school. They will write lesson plans and teach in the secondary setting and be evaluated by the instructor.

Prerequisites: EDUC 110, 294, 295, & 296

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Education, Majors, Endorsements


EDUC 396K Secondary Special Methods, Major: Physical Education & Curriculum

Credits: 3

Students will learn techniques to use in teaching secondary physical education. Students will also write lesson plans and teach them to secondary students and be evaluated by classmates and the instructor.

Prerequisites: EDUC 110 Introduction to Teacher Education, EDUC 294 Foundations of Education, EDUC 296 Educational Psychology, PE 290 Curriculum Instruction & Design PE K-12, EDUC 110, 294, 296 & PE 290

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Education, Majors, Physical Education, Endorsements, Health, Physical Education


EDUC 396L Secondary Special Methods, Major: Mathematics

Credits: 3

Students will learn techniques to use in teaching math in the secondary school. They will write lesson plans and teach in the secondary setting and be evaluated by the instructor.

Prerequisites: EDUC 110 Introduction to Teacher Education, EDUC 294 Foundations of Education, EDUC 295 Curriculum Development and Evaluation, EDUC 296 Educational Psychology, EDUC 110, 294, 294 & 296

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Education, Majors, Endorsements


EDUC 402-404 Senior Seminar for Student Teachers

Credits: 1

An integral part of the student teaching experience, this required course provides students the opportunity to review classroom organization and management, job seeking strategies and an ongoing series of exercises encouraging reflection on the student teaching experience.

Prerequisites: Full Admission into Teacher Education and Approval for Student Teaching.

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Education, Majors, Early Childhood Education, Elementary Education, Endorsements, Health, K-8 English/Language Arts, K-8 Science, K-8 Social Studies, Music, Physical Education


EDUC 421 Practicum in Early Childhood Education (Preschool)

Credits: 3 or 6

Students learn how to plan and implement instruction using a variety of strategies that meet the needs of individual students. They gain understanding of how prior learning and cultural background impacts children’s learning. Students also understand the importance of creating a warm, caring, structured learning environment emphasizing quality communication with students, parents, colleagues and various community sources. Students also understand the importance of professional development.

Prerequisites: All coursework listed on the Early Childhood Education Checklist and Full Admission to Teacher Education Program.

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Education, Majors, Early Childhood Education


EDUC 422 Practicum in Early Childhood Education (Kindergarten)

Credits: 3 or 6

Students learn how to plan and implement instruction using a variety of strategies that meet the needs of individual students. They understand how prior learning and cultural background impacts learning. Students gain an appreciation about the importance of creating a warm, caring, and structured learning environment as well as effective methods to communication with students, parents, colleagues and various community sources. Students will also understand the importance of professional development.

Prerequisites: All coursework listed on the Early Childhood Education Checklist and Full Admission to Teacher Education Program.

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Education, Majors, Early Childhood Education


EDUC 442-443 Practicum in Elementary Education

Credits: 6-14

A full-time program of experience in one or more elementary schools at two grade levels. Students learn how to plan and implement instruction using a variety of strategies that meet the needs of individual students. They understand how students learn and how prior learning and cultural background impacts learning. Students gain knowledge about the importance of creating a warm, caring, structured learning environment through effective communication with students, parents, colleagues and various community sources. Students gain experience through professional development opportunities.

Prerequisites: All coursework listed on the Elementary Education Checklist and Full Admission to Teacher Education Program.

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Education, Majors, Elementary Education


EDUC 451 Diagnostic and Assessment Reading Methods

Credits: 3

Students will gain information about standardized, formal assessment methods in the area of reading; general principles of assessment and diagnosis, including basic statistics. Students will consider how disabilities impact acquisition of reading skills and reading instruction and learn techniques for using reading assessment to guide classroom instruction.

Prerequisites: EDUC 324 Primary Literacy Methods, EDUC 324

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Education, Endorsements, Reading


EDUC 452 Remedial Reading Methods

Credits: 3

Students will gain information about the informal assessment of students with reading difficulties and explore effective reading strategies and methods in major areas of reading including phonemic awareness, phonics, word identification, vocabulary, comprehension, writing, spelling, fluency, the attitudes of readers and writers and meeting individual student needs.

Prerequisites: EDUC 324 Primary Literacy Methods, EDUC 324

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Education, Majors, Endorsements, Reading


EDUC 453-454 Remedial Reading Practicum at K-8 or 5-12 level

Credits: 3

A field experience in a Title 1 classroom with a certified Title 1 teacher. Students completing this experience will be able to successfully implement all components to a remedial reading classroom including assessment, diagnosis, prescription, and remediation.

Prerequisites: All coursework listed on the Reading Endorsement Checklist and Full Admission to Teacher Education Program.

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Education, Endorsements, Reading


EDUC 455 Multi-tiered Systems of Support

Credits: 3

This course examines the three-tiered system of prevention and intervention currently mandated for public school districts. Upon completion of this course, students will have a thorough understanding of the historical and research-based foundation for a multi-tiered system approach, as well as how to implement the three levels in their schools with appropriate levels of intensity. Specific areas of concentration include curriculum and instruction, assessment and progress monitoring, and social- behavioral support while ensuring fidelity of implementation school- or district-wide.

Prerequisites: Junior or Senior standing or approval of Instructor

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Education, Majors


EDUC 482-483 Practicum K-12 Education

Credits: 6-14

An individually planned program of experience in one elementary school and one secondary school for K-12 Art, Music, and Physical Education Majors. (See EDUC 442-443 or 492-493) Students will learn how to plan and implement instruction using a variety of strategies that meet the needs of individual students. They will gain knowledge and experience about how students learn and how prior learning and cultural backgrounds impact learning. Students will gain knowledge and experience about the importance of creating a warm, caring, and structured learning environment through effective communication with students, parents, colleagues and various community sources. Students gain experience through professional development opportunities.

Prerequisites: All coursework listed on the K-12 Checklist and Full Admission to Teacher Education Program.

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Education, Majors, Early Childhood Education, Educational Foundations, Elementary Education, Exercise Science and Wellness, Physical Education, Endorsements, Athletic Coaching, Reading, Early Childhood Education, Health, Instructional Strategist I: Mild & Moderate, K-8 English/Language Arts, K-8 Science, K-8 Social Studies, Music, Physical Education


EDUC 498 Internship

Credits: 6-14

The field experience allows for a substantive field experience in an area of interest to the student. The field experience will be tailored to the student’s particular interest and skill. The field experience is required of students who are pursuing an undergraduate degree in education without licensure. Planning and project research must take place with the instructor of the field experience. The field experience normally takes place during the senior year. Specific qualifications, guidelines, and project placement information may be obtained from the program advisor. All plans and decisions will be made in consultation with both the student’s academic advisor and the Director of Field Experience.

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Education, Majors, Educational Foundations


EDUC 555 Multi-tiered Systems of Support

Credits: 3

This course examines the three-tiered system of prevention and intervention currently mandated for public school districts. Upon completion of this course, students will have a thorough understanding of the historical and research-based foundation for a multi-tiered system approach, as well as how to implement the three levels in their schools with appropriate levels of intensity. Specific areas of concentration include curriculum and instruction, assessment and progress monitoring, and social- behavioral support while ensuring fidelity of implementation school- or district-wide.

Prerequisites: Completion of Bachelor’s degree

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Education


ENG 100 Fundamentals of English

Credits: 4

Instruction in composition to prepare students for ENG 105. Students completing the course will write clear sentences and paragraphs, and they will demonstrate basic competence in thesis and idea development, organization, style, and proofreading skills.

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Humanities


ENG 105 College Composition and Research (WI)

Credits: 3

Instruction in academic writing at the college entry level. Assignments progress from essays that review and enhance rhetorical foundations to an introduction of scholarly research. The course promotes as learning outcomes an understanding of rhetorical foundations, such as grammar, audience, and voice; development of an effective writing process that includes peer review and team work; demonstration of research skills and accurate citation of sources; and participation in academic discussions that produce polished, final writings in an e-portfolio.

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Humanities, Endorsements, Reading


ENG 201 Writing and Research about Literature (WI)

Credits: 3

In this course, students will be introduced to the study of short fiction, drama, and poetry. Learning outcomes include an understanding of these genres as distinct types of literature, an ability to analyze literary texts through students’ own writing and other forms of presentation, and the ability to perform research related to such analysis.

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Humanities, Endorsements, Reading


ENG 206 Modern Poetry

Credits: 3

Exploration of the uses of language in poetry; examination of representative 20th century poems. Students will read modern poems, identifying structural patterns and specific uses of language and discerning meaning, and will recognize poetic language used in headlines and advertising.

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Humanities


ENG 247 Imaginative Writing: Poetry and Prose (WI)

Credits: 3

Work in forms such as short story, lyric poem, and creative nonfiction. Students will demonstrate originality and craft in at least one creative genre through a portfolio of writing.

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Humanities


ENG 311 Expository Writing (WI)

Credits: 3

Advanced writing course emphasizing clarity and coherence in expository expression. Students will submit writing portfolios demonstrating ability to fulfill a variety of writing tasks at a level of competence beyond the first year exit level.

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Humanities, Endorsements, K-8 English/Language Arts


ENG 326 Environmental Literature

Credits: 3

This course studies diverse genres that address environmental topics to enable students to develop the ability to assess the rhetorical implications of genre, to identify values within the readings, to articulate their own values, and to understand the tradition and practice of American environmental writing in comparison with other literary and storytelling traditions.

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Humanities


ENG 327 Reading Film as Literature

Credits: 4

This course focuses on narrative film and aspects of narrative that apply to fiction and drama: character, story, and spectacle. It offers the opportunity to understand the evolution of film over the past 100 years, and it will reflect on the ideological underpinnings of film. Students will debate film issues, read selected criticism, and share their critical writing. Students will demonstrate their understanding of critical and theoretical issues in several short papers exploring and analyzing film narrative. They also will heighten their awareness of audience and reflect on their developing sense of film values through a variety of other activities, such as posting to blogs and doing workshops.

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Humanities


ENG 333 Masters of British Literature I

Credits: 3

This historical survey course, which also includes an introduction to critical theory, begins with Beowulf and ends with the sensibility movement in England, with major focus on Chaucer, Donne, Milton, and Swift. Students will recognize literary characteristics and historical context of major writers and apply a specific critical approach.

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Humanities


ENG 334 Masters of British Literature II

Credits: 3

This course succeeds English 333 and continues the study of English literature from the Romantic period through the Victorian era to the present. Students will recognize major literary figures and describe intellectual and historical emphases of each period.

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Humanities


ENG 341 Masters of World Literature (WI)

Credits: 3

Selected readings from various periods and world literatures, all in English translation. Students will discuss works comparatively and discern values, patterns of behavior, and uses of language in various texts.

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Humanities


ENG 344 Media Ecology and the Humanities

Credits: 3

The course introduces students to the critical study of media as environment, with a special emphasis on how culture, religion, the arts, and education systems are affected by media and media change. Course work includes readings from an interdisciplinary text, the critical use and creation of web-based multimedia resources, reflection upon the communication process and engagement in the skillful and informed interpretation of literary, expository, and filmic texts. Students will work both individually and in groups to consider how changes in technology can redefine these aspects of culture and to apply their insights to the contemporary realities of their personal, professional, and civic lives.

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Humanities


ENG 349 Masters of American Literature I

Credits: 3

Surveys major American writers through mid-19th century, with emphasis on Emerson, Thoreau, Hawthorne, Melville, and Douglass. Students will identify major historical periods and implications for literary genres and ideas and will discern meaning in major texts.

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Humanities, Endorsements, K-8 English/Language Arts


ENG 350 Masters of American Literature II

Credits: 3

Surveys American literature from Whitman, Dickinson, and Twain through the present. Students will show awareness of cultural diversity in American literature, discern meaning in major texts, and explain accurately the characteristics of genres and literary periods.

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Humanities, Endorsements, K-8 English/Language Arts


ENG 352 Shakespeare

Credits: 3

Detailed study of several plays. Students will explain historical context, discern meaning in individual plays, and recognize particular uses of language and literary devices.

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Humanities


ENG 365 Masters of English Novel

Credits: 3

Detailed reading of several major novels from the 18th century to the present. Students will explain historical contexts and discern meaning in individual novels.

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Humanities


ENG 380 Topics in Literature

Credits: 1-3

An opportunity for upper division students to study selected topics in literature not offered on a regular basis.

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Humanities


ENG 440, 441, 442 Career Applications in English

Credits: 2-6

Offers Internship options such as research, case studies, commercial/ professional problem-solving, and, for the student employed full-time, the 2-3 credit hour options of site-based analytical projects. Students will meet professional expectations in the workplace.

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Humanities


ENG 497 Independent Study in English

Credits: 1-3

For advanced students with adequate preparation. Written consent of the head of the division required. Student will develop a plan of study in conjunction with a faculty member and fulfill the expectations established in that plan (e.g., producing a well- research critical study or presenting a portfolio of well-crafted creative writing).

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Humanities


ENG 498 Internship in English

Credits: 6-12

A substantive Internship with emphasis on writing. Students will plan a single Internship that generates the number of credit hours desired (typically six). All planning must be done in consultation with the academic advisor and the Director of Internship. Students will meet professional expectations as determined by the site supervisor and will present a portfolio of work samples and reflections upon the learning experience, demonstrating at a minimum competence in writing, social interaction, and self-understanding.

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Humanities


ENG 499 Seminar in English

Credits: 3

The capstone course for English majors, the senior seminar will offer intensive study of a designated literary period, author, or genre and will provide instruction and practice in writing at an advanced level. Students will lead class sessions, apply specific critical approaches, conduct research, and prepare and defend a scholarly final project.

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Humanities


EVHL 300 Environmental Chemistry

Credits: 3

This course will study the chemistry of our environment and the chemistry underlying our modern environmental problems. Discussion will involve the health effects of environmental chemical/toxins and the processes or mechanisms involved. Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to demonstrate knowledge of environmental chemicals and toxins and their relationship to environmental health.

Prerequisites: 8 hours of chemistry

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Science


EVHL 330 Environmental Health

Credits: 4

A lecture, laboratory, field study of the important principles of environmental health. The environmental factors that affect human health and well-being are emphasized. This course provides the basic knowledge and skills necessary to identify, evaluate, and communicate environmental conditions that have an impact on human health and to plan and/or implement strategies to control or manage environmental problems. Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to describe the principles of environmental health, the impact of environmental conditions, and management strategies for environmental problems.

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Science


GOV 105 American Government

Credits: 3

An outline of the structure and process of government at the national level. Upon successful completion of the course, students will demonstrate an understanding of the U.S. Constitution, the federal government and the federal court system, and be able especially to articulate the rights and role of the individual citizen.

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Science


GOV 110 State and Local Government

Credits: 3

A survey of the structure and procedure of state and local governments. Upon successful completion of the course, students will demonstrate an understanding of, and be able to evaluate, the relationship between states and the federal government, variations in law-making at the state level, and proposals for reform.

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Science


HIST 125 U.S. History Survey, 1607-1877

Credits: 3

A topic-driven overview of American history from the colonial era through Reconstruction. Areas of inquiry may include European-Native American contact, effects of religious and political ideas, the influence of mercantilism and capitalism on colonial and national growth, aspects of party development, the rise and effects of slavery and sectionalism, national expansion, and issues related to domestic economic development. Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to define, describe, and explain events broadly related to colonial development, the American Revolution, the Constitution and early national growth, and the Civil War and Reconstruction

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Humanities


HIST 126 U.S. History Survey, 1877-present

Credits: 3

Topical survey of American history from the Gilded Age to the present. Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to define, describe, and explain the rise and effects of big business and industrial capitalism, the outlines of racial segregation and discrimination, the world wars and other military conflicts, economic issues related to the Great Depression and New Deal, and political controversies surrounding the Civil Rights Movement and the Cold War.

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Humanities


HIST 173 Western Civilization to 1350

Credits: 3

A survey of the birth and rise western culture and institutions up to the Renaissance. Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to define, describe and explain the civilizations of ancient Greece and Rome, describe and offer explanations of the rise of Christianity and the early Church, and summarize the growth of economic, political and social institutions in medieval Europe.

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Humanities


HIST 174 Western Civilization since 1350

Credits: 3

An overview of western political, social, and economic institutions and events from the Renaissance to the present. Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to define, describe, and explain the Renaissance and Reformation, the nature of absolutism, the Enlightenment and Scientific Revolution, politics and revolution during the 18th and 19th centuries, European imperialism, the World Wars, and the culmination of the Cold War.

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Humanities


HIST 320 Ante-Bellum America

Credits: 3

America from around 1820 through 1860. Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to analyze, evaluate, and discuss issues related to party formation and political development, the market revolution, war and westward expansion, slavery and the Old South, the anti-slavery movement, sectionalism, and the causes of the Civil War.

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Humanities


HIST 380 Topics

Credits: 3

Specialized courses that provide students with an opportunity to study aspects of history or subjects not ordinarily covered in other courses. Students who successfully complete these courses will demonstrate in-depth understanding of the topic through detailed reading and writing assignments and interaction with the instructor.

Prerequisites: 3.00 GPA and permission of the division chair.

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Humanities


HIST 497 Independent Study

Credits: 3

Individual research into a specific area of history, under the supervision of history faculty. Reading and writing assignments are typically in excess of those required for other history courses. Students will successfully complete such courses only if the instructor is satisfied that student work and comprehension is adequate.

Prerequisites: Independent Study is directed toward advanced students, and must be approved by the division chair.

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Humanities


HIST 498 Internship in History

Credits: 6-12

The internship allows for practical work experience in history. This course is required for all history (non Teacher Education) majors.

Prerequisites: Junior or Senior standing

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Humanities


HIST 499 History Seminar

Credits: 1

Enrolled students shall combine research and writing with their approved Internship. Students are required to develop a comprehensive research project that relates directly to their Internship. A formal paper and a detailed public presentation are also required. Students are expected to work closely with their instructor as the Internship progresses.

Prerequisites: Senior standing

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Humanities


HLTH 200 Substance Abuse

Credits: 2

The student will learn and understand about the uses and abuses of drugs. They will learn about the physiological and psychological processes involved with drug use and abuse, as well as legal implications.

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Education, Majors, Exercise Science and Wellness, Physical Education, Endorsements, Health


HLTH 234 Community Health

Credits: 3

In this class the students will learn about the various facets of community health and what their involvement is. General topics discussed will include (but not be limited to) the following: History; Women, Infants and Children; Adolescents; Adults, Elderly, Insurance; Health Care; Economic; School Health; Emergency Management; and Environment.

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Education, Majors, Exercise Science and Wellness, Physical Education, Endorsements, Athletic Coaching, Health, Physical Education


HLTH 300 Health and Nutrition

Credits: 3

During class, students will learn the basics of nutrition. They will learn about chemical processes involved in nutrition, weight control, balanced diet and illness caused by poor nutrition. Through projects, they will be able to evaluate their own nutritional habits.

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Education, Majors, Early Childhood Education, Exercise Science and Wellness, Physical Education, Endorsements, Athletic Coaching, Early Childhood Education, Health, Physical Education


HLTH 334 Consumer Health & Personal Wellness

Credits: 3

This course is designed so the student can learn 1) factual, scientifically based information about health goods and services and 2) how to become a better consumer by developing or sharpening their skills such as decision-making, values clarification, assertiveness, bargaining, and data collection and analysis.

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Education, Majors, Exercise Science and Wellness, Physical Education, Endorsements, Athletic Coaching, Health, Physical Education


MATH 150 Fundamentals of Mathematics and Problem Solving

Credits: 3

A course that teaches problem solving skills by helping the students define the problem, discover the relevant information, devise a plan, carry out the plan, and look back on the problem solving process. Students completing this course will demonstrate an understanding of following: Logic, Set Theory, Number Systems, Algebraic Manipulation, Graphs and Geometry. The National Council of Teachers of Mathematics (NCTM) standards are emphasized.

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Science, Majors, Early Childhood Education


MATH 162 College Algebra and Trigonometry

Credits: 4

Students satisfactorily completing this course will understand algebraic, exponential, logarithmic, and trigonometric functions. This course serves as a preparation for calculus. Not open to students who have successfully completed high school mathematics through advanced math or calculus except by consent of the instructor.

Prerequisites: A working knowledge of algebra

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Science


MATH 171 Elementary Statistics

Credits: 4

An introduction to probability and statistics. Students satisfactorily completing this course will demonstrate skills in assignment of probability using permutations and combinations, distributions of random variables and statistics, and large sample theory, introduction to estimation and tests of significance. Includes Excel lab.

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Science


MATH 221 Discrete Mathematics

Credits: 3

A problem-solving course using techniques appropriate for finite mathematical structures. Students satisfactorily completing this course will understand sets and logics, graphs, trees, and techniques of counting.

Prerequisites: MATH 162 or equivalent

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Science


MATH 231 Calculus I – Fall

Credits: 4

An introduction to calculus. Students satisfactorily completing this course will understand the differentiation and applications of elementary and transcendental functions.

Prerequisites: MATH 162 or equivalent

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Science


MATH 323 Linear Algebra

Credits: 3

Students satisfactorily completing this course will understand systems of linear equations, matrix algebra, vector spaces, linear transformations, and related topics.

Prerequisites: MATH 231

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Science


MATH 355 Introduction to Sets and Logic

Credits: 3

Students satisfactorily completing this course will be able to read, write and reason mathematically. Topics include elementary logic, sets and their properties, relations, functions, Boolean algebra, and finite and infinite sets.

Prerequisites: MATH 232

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Science


MATH 380 Topics in Mathematics

Credits: 1-3

An intensive study of a topic. The topic selected will depend on student needs and interests, staff interests, and the judgment of the mathematics faculty. May be repeated. Possible topics include: Boolean algebra, probability, Fourier Series, history of mathematics, continued fractions, group theory, Fibonacci Sequences. No more than six hours will be counted toward the major unless recommended by the Division chairperson.

Prerequisites: A minimum of 14 credit hours of college mathematics

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Science


MATH 429 Geometry

Credits: 3

The study of modern elementary geometry. Students satisfactorily completing this course will understand select topics from Euclidean and non-Euclidean geometry including coordinate systems, betweenness, existence theorems, principles of duality, plane separation principle, congruence, exterior angle theorem, and parallelism.

Prerequisites: MATH 355

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Science


MATH 491 Algebraic Structures

Credits: 3

Students satisfactorily completing this course will understand logical development of various algebraic structures. The study will include groups, rings and fields.

Prerequisites: MATH 355

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Science


MATH 497 Independent Study in Mathematics

Credits: 1-3

Independent study by advanced students. A student selects a problem to be studied in consultation with a mathematics professor and works on it independently, with weekly consultations with the professor.

Prerequisites: 20 hours of mathematics and consent of the program coordinator

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Science


MUS 100 Music Lab

Credits: 0-.5

A variety of activities are planned for music lab – activities that extend and supplement courses normally offered including repertoire class - opportunities for students to perform regularly in front of an audience, student conducting, guest speakers, student, faculty, and guest artist performances, error detection, and sight- singing are some of the possible activities.

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Humanities, Endorsements, Music


MUS 123 Diction I

Credits: 1

This course is designed to help students master the basic rules of English, Latin, and Italian lyric diction. A great singer depends heavily on his or her power of expression. Expressive singing brings the full meaning and emotion of the words and thoughts to a performance in addition to singing beautifully and accurately. Serious vocalists seek to find ways to bring words into a more intimate union with the notes.

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Humanities, Endorsements, Music


MUS 124 Diction II

Credits: 1

This course is designed to help students master the basic rules of German and French lyric diction. A great singer depends heavily on his or her power of expression. Expressive singing brings the full meaning and emotion of the words and thoughts to a performance in addition to singing beautifully and accurately. Serious vocalists seek to find ways to bring words into a more intimate union with the notes.

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Humanities, Endorsements, Music


MUS 141 Music Fundamentals

Credits: 2

An introductory course covering the basic elements of music including pitch, notation, rhythm, meter, scales, key signatures, modes, intervals and triads. Upon completion of this course, students will be able to describe and identify elements of musical notation, including pitches in multiple clefs, key signatures and modes and rhythm in multiple meters. Students will also be able to identify major, minor and modal scales and intervals and triads within those scales.

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Humanities


MUS 142 Elementary Harmony

Credits: 2

A continuation of written exercises and keyboard harmony utilizing diatonic triads and seventh chords, nonharmonic tones, and secondary dominants. Analysis and composition of the small musical forms. To be taken with MUS 144. Students successfully completing this course will be able to demonstrate (in notation and, when applicable, at the keyboard) understanding of C clefs, diatonic triads, seventh chords, non-harmonic tones, the medieval modes, secondary dominants and common chord modulation. They will continue to develop the ability to apply the material in practical ways in the performance and teaching of music. They will also become increasingly familiar with music technology applications, particularly FINALÉ.

Prerequisites: MUS 141

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Humanities, Endorsements, Music


MUS 143 Aural Skills I

Credits: 1

Singing of diatonic melodies in bass and treble clefs and in major and minor modes. Introduction to alto and tenor clefs. Dictation of rhythm; of intervals and diatonic melodies; and of harmonic progressions utilizing the principal triads. Students successfully completing this course will be able to identify and sing major, natural and melodic minor scales in solfège (“movable do”), major and minor triads, and all intervals (ascending) within one octave. They will be able to sing, at sight and in solfège, major and minor diatonic melodies in various keys both stepwise and triadic (outlining tonic and dominant triads) in treble and bass clefs, and read rhythms including the division of the beat in simple and compound meters. They will also be able to notate (from aural examples) such melodies and rhythmic patterns (separately). In addition they will be able to identify root position tonic and dominant triads in chorale settings.

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Humanities, Endorsements, Music


MUS 144 Aural Skills II

Credits: 1

A continuation of singing and diatonic melodies in bass, treble, alto and tenor clefs, including modulation to closely-related keys. Dictation of rhythm; of intervals and diatonic melodies; and of harmonic progressions including diatonic triads and seventh chords. Students successfully completing this course will be able to identify and sing (in solfège, “movable do”) the harmonic minor scale, inverted major and minor triads, root position diminished and augmented triads, and all descending intervals within one octave. They will be able to sing, at sight, major and minor diatonic melodies (in treble, bass, alto, or tenor clefs) containing larger and more numerous leaps than those in MUS 143, as well as notate such melodies from aural examples. They will also be able to read rhythms in simple and compound meters including the subdivision of the beat. In addition, they will be able to notate (from aural examples) harmonic progressions containing the principal diatonic harmonies, including inversions.

Prerequisites: MUS 143

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Humanities, Endorsements, Music


MUS 225 Survey of Musical Literature

Credits: 3

The study of music for the liberal arts student. The course is designed to acquaint the student with the structure and application of the most important musical forms and the major periods of music history. No previous musical experience is necessary.

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Humanities


MUS 241 Advanced Harmony: Part Writing and Keyboard

Credits: 2

Written exercises and keyboard harmony utilizing chromatic and extended tertian harmony; remote modulation; styles of writing other than chorale style. Analysis of binary and ternary form. To be taken with MUS 243. Students who successfully complete this course will be able to demonstrate (in notation and, when applicable, at the keyboard) understanding of the principles of harmonic sequence, secondary dominant and leading tone chords, modulation, use of seventh (and larger) chords, chromatic harmony (including mode mixture, Neapolitan sixth and augmented sixth chords), and the basic principles of formal structure. They will also continue to develop their abilities to apply music theory in practical ways, including using analysis as an aid in preparing to perform and teach music, and they will become increasingly fluent with music technology applications, in particular, FINALÉ.

Prerequisites: MUS 142

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Humanities, Endorsements, Music


MUS 243 Aural Skills III

Credits: 1

Singing of chromatic and modal melodies. Dictation of superimposed rhythm, unusual and mixed meters; chromatic melodies and harmonic progressions. It is assumed that the sight-singing proficiency will be passed by the end of the semester. Students successfully completing this course will be able to identify and sing modal scales (in solfège, “movable do”), seventh chords (major, minor, diminished and half diminished). They will be able to sing (in solfège), at sight, melodies that modulate, and modal and chromatic melodies, as well as notate such melodies from aural examples. They will also be able to read complex rhythms in simple and compound meters. In addition, they will be able to notate harmonic progressions employing both diatonic and chromatic harmonies.

Prerequisites: MUS 144

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Humanities, Endorsements, Music


MUS 244 Aural Skills IV

Credits: 2

Sight singing of advanced rhythmic patterns in simple and compound meter with major and minor scales, modes, and pentatonic scales. Students successfully completing this course will be able to sing and identify non-chord tones, secondary dominants, Neapolitan sixth chords and other chromatic harmonies. Students will also perform rhythmic and melodic examples at sight and identify diatonic and chromatic chords in 4-part harmony. It is assumed that the sight-singing proficiency will be passed by the end of the semester.

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Humanities


MUS 304 Jazz Theory and Improvisation

Credits: 2

A historical study of twentieth century jazz music in America via scales, chords, and harmonic progressions with an emphasis on performance applications to traditional jazz band instrumentation: sax, trumpet, trombone and rhythm section. Including a study of jazz band chart reading and a basic understanding of keyboard voicings and scoring for combos and big bands.

Prerequisites: Music 141-2, 241, (Music theory)

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Humanities


MUS 328 Materials of Music

Credits: 3

A study of counterpoint, form and analysis, contemporary styles and composition. Students who successfully complete this course will be able to demonstrate an understanding of the components and procedures of musical structural design, and their significance as tools in enhancing musical understanding. They will be able to analyze compositions with respect to micro- and macro-formal structure, as well as identify contrapuntal techniques when applicable. In addition, the student will be able to analyze structural elements in contemporary works, including tonal and non-tonal systems. They will also continue to develop their abilities to apply music theory in practical ways, including using analysis as an aid in preparing to perform and teach music, and they will become increasingly fluent with music technology applications, in particular, FINALÉ.

Prerequisites: MUS 241 or consent of instructor

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Humanities, Endorsements, Music


MUS 353 History of Music (WI)

Credits: 3

A study of the history of music from the early Christian era to 1750, based on stylistic and formal analysis, as well as performance practices. Students will develop skill in discerning various musical styles from the written score and from listening to recordings. Students will develop skill in discussing the elements of musical style based on their experiences with the scores and the recordings. They will develop their vocabulary to describe the various components of music—melody, rhythm, harmony, texture, instrumentation, orchestration, form, etc.) Students will synthesize an array of skills that have been acquired in their introductory music courses. In this course students will make connections between assigned reading, class discussion of style and the assigned listening. Through their study of the music from the early Christian era to 1750, students will learn standard interpretive skills appropriate to the various periods of music history and begin to have an understanding of the aesthetics of western music. Students will develop skill in discerning various musical styles from the written score and from listening to recordings.

Prerequisites: Writing Intensive Course: Successful Completion of English 105 and 201 required. Prerequisite: MUS 142 or permission of instructor.

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Humanities, Endorsements, Music


MUS 354 History of Music (WI)

Credits: 3

A study of the history of music from 1750 to the present, based on stylistic and formal analysis, as well as performance practices. Students will develop skill in discerning various musical styles from the written score and from listening to recordings. Students will develop skill in discussing the elements of musical style based on their experiences with the scores and the recordings. They will develop their vocabulary to describe the various components of music—melody, rhythm, harmony, texture, instrumentation, orchestration, form, etc.) Students will synthesize an array of skills that have been acquired in their introductory music courses. In this course students will make connections between assigned reading, class discussion of style and the assigned listening. Through their study of the music from 1750 to the present, students will learn standard interpretive skills appropriate to the various periods of music history and begin to have an understanding of the aesthetics of western music. Students will develop skill in discerning various musical styles from the written score and from listening to recordings.

Prerequisites: Writing Intensive Course: Successful Completion of English 105 and 201 required. Prerequisite: MUS 142 or permission of instructor.

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Humanities, Endorsements, Music


MUS 355 Elementary Music Methods and Curriculum

Credits: 2

Techniques for teaching elementary classroom music. Includes techniques in, and experience teaching, reading songs, rote songs, two-part songs, listening lessons, movement activities and creative lessons. Students will develop musical skills and gain knowledge of basic music elements and terminology used in the elementary music classroom; explore and practicing common methods of elementary music instruction (Orff, Kodaly, Dalcroze, Gordon); incorporate rhythm, melody, harmony and movement activities in the elementary school classroom via: developing rhythmic musicianship through the practice and study of rhythm instruments; demonstrate and develop basic harmonic understanding via performing on piano, the autoharp, guitar and/or ukulele; demonstrate proficiency in basic tonal musicianship through singing and the study of melodic instruments including the song flute (recorder) by reading and performing short songs in a variety of keys; practice and demonstrate movement and rhythm via folk dances; demonstrate effective lesson plan writing. Includes thirty (30) hours observation in the schools.

Prerequisites: MUS 142 or permission of instructor

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Humanities


MUS 356 Secondary Music Methods and Curriculum

Credits: 2

Develops a philosophy for teaching music and skills for teaching secondary music including general music, the changing voice, rehearsal techniques, recruiting, evaluation, motivation, public relations, and administrative responsibilities. In Secondary Music Methods students will study and learn skills that will prepare them to be choral music educators primarily at the middle school and high school levels. Concepts and skills covered will include creating a philosophy of choral music education, learning techniques for recruiting and motivating singers, planning and building a choral music program, processing information and managing a choral program, working with adolescent singers, discipline in rehearsal, choosing quality literature, rehearsal and vocal techniques.

Prerequisites: MUS 142

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Humanities, Endorsements, Music


MUS 357 Instrumental Conducting

Credits: 2

An intermediate course in polishing of conducting skills with emphasis on study of and application of rehearsal techniques. Experience conducting an instrumental group is provided to become skilled in use of expressive gestures, control of tempo changes and changing meters. Knowledge of common transpositions and score reading are included. Students will demonstrate adequate proficiency conducting instrumental music ensembles through in-class exercises, recorded musical excerpts, leading small ensembles in music lab presentations. Students will demonstrate proficiency conducting music in common and uncommon meter signatures; use gestures to indicate fermatas, rubato phrasing, cuing, dynamics and expression; demonstrate music theory proficiency by analyzing works through score study and preparation; reinforce and demonstrate adequate piano skills (i.e. condensed score reading from the piano, and on-the-spot transpositions).

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Humanities, Endorsements, Music


MUS 358 Choral Conducting

Credits: 2

Organization and conducting of choral groups. This course is designed to follow Basic Conducting and provide each student with a higher level of ability in all facets of the conducting art. Throughout the semester, students will more thoroughly study gesture, a system of score study (including preparation of scores and written assignments), terms, transpositions, complex meters, communication, and disciplines that will help them prepare to conduct and direct a choral ensemble of his/her own. Students will be evaluated on ability to read and analyze a choral score, research music styles, lead rehearsal, conduct with appropriate gesture, phrasing, musical style and confidence.

Prerequisites: MUS 251 or consent of instructor

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Humanities, Endorsements, Music


MUS 380 Topics

Credits: 1-3

An opportunity for upper division students to study selected topics in music not offered on a regular basis (piano pedagogy, church music, composition, and music education materials).

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Humanities


MUS 386 Instrumental Methods and Curriculum

Credits: 2

Develops a philosophy and approach to teaching all levels of instrumental music based on music learning sequences for rhythmic and tonal context and performance technique. Includes techniques in and experience performing and teaching brass, percussion, woodwind and string instruments. Also includes observations, marching band techniques, teaching practicum. In conjunction with EDUC 263 Participation and Analysis in the Schools. Students will acquire skills inherent to the art of successful instrumental music teaching in elementary and secondary schools including but not limited to: techniques and methods for teaching woodwind, brass, percussion, and string instruments for beginning through advanced students; demonstrate effective concert band, jazz band, marching band rehearsal techniques; demonstrate proficiency in marching band drill writing using the PYWARE© computer program; demonstrate strategies for recognizing and correcting student performance problems including developing the embouchure, breathing and phrasing, and tone production.

Prerequisites: MUS 113, 115, 117, 118, and 119 or consent of the instructor

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Humanities, Endorsements, Music


MUS 398 Practicum

Credits: 2-3

Often serves as a pre-internship experience or may be an on-campus Internship under the supervision of faculty or staff.

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Humanities


MUS 440, 441, 442 Career Applications

Credits: 2-6

Internship projects that do not fit a six-credit hour internship.

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Humanities


MUS 481 Arranging

Credits: 2

Study of principles, practices, and techniques of writing and arranging vocal and instrumental groups. Students will arrange vocal and instrumental music for available performers. Students will develop practical music arranging skills by learning to adapt and create musical scores for specific instrumental and vocal ensembles. Students will become proficient using the music notation program FINALÉ including developing the following skills: arranging pieces with melodies, chords and lyrics; arranging small ensemble works; ranges, transpositions, timbre qualities and characteristics of woodwind, brass, strings and percussion instruments; arrange works in appropriate styles; develop practical applications of music theory and harmony through mastering a 4-part contemporary voicing method applicable to small groups, jazz bands and/or vocal jazz ensembles; develop advanced music computer skills, importing, exporting, adapting and transcribing MIDI files into FINALÉ notation.

Prerequisites: MUS 328

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Humanities, Endorsements, Music


MUS 497 Independent Study in Music

Credits: 1-2

For advanced music students with adequate preparation. Written consent of the head of the program required.

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Humanities


MUS 498 Internship

Credits: 6-14

The internship allows for a substantive Internship for music students not seeking teaching licensure. Internships will be tailored to the student’s particular interest and developing skill. The number of hours involved with a particular internship will determine the number of credit hours to be earned. Normally an internship is completed in the senior year. All plans and decisions will be made in consultation with the student’s academic advisor and the Director of Internship.

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Humanities


NUR 180 Integration: Human Diseases and Disorders–Spring–Elective

Credits: 3

The study of human diseases utilizes an integrated approach, which guides the student in his/her study and learning of human physiology. The course will integrate human learning and the development of strong study habits to promote academic success. The successful student will acquire an understanding of the relationships between anatomical structures and their physiological functions in the human body. Students will critically think about how normal processes promote homeostasis within the body. Additionally, students will be able to analyze the characteristics associated with the disease processes when pathological changes occur.

Prerequisites: Unable to meet benchmark for NUR 213 and by permission of instructor.

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Nursing


NUR 200 Introduction to Health Care Terminology – Fall

Credits: 1

Introduction to Health Care Terminology focuses on key concepts of terminology used in health care. The student who successfully completes the course will be able to demonstrate the use of health care terminology and discuss the relationship between nursing, medicine and allied health fields and standardized health care terminology. This course is open to both nursing and non-nursing majors and will benefit the student pursuing a health career.

Prerequisites: ENG 105, BIO 241, BIO 242, CHEM 105

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Nursing


NUR 205 Fundamentals of Nursing I – Fall (WI)

Credits: 3

Fundamentals of Nursing I is a course focusing on key concepts of baccalaureate nursing education. The student who successfully completes this course will be able to describe the impact of the health delivery systems on nursing functions, identify family-based and community-based nursing practice and describe how critical thinking skills contribute to the leadership role of the nurse. Students will be able to identify the use of ethical, legal, spiritual and cultural values in professional relationships.

Prerequisites: ENG 105, BIO 241 and BIO 242, and CHEM 105.

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Nursing


NUR 206 Fundamentals of Nursing II – Spring

Credits: 4

Introduction to Nursing Practice presents the student to professional nursing as a science, a practice, and a process. The course presents an overview of the interrelationships of nursing, person, health, and environment. Emphasis is on nursing practice that provides for health promotion and assistance to adult clients to obtain their optimal level of functioning. Students successfully completing this course will be able to demonstrate the skills of critical thinking, nursing process, therapeutic communication and physical assessment as they apply to professional nursing practice.

Prerequisites: NUR 200, NUR 205, NUR 213 and CNA status.

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Nursing


NUR 208 Physical Assessment – Spring

Credits: 3

Introduction to Physical Assessment focusses on physical and psychosocial health across the lifespan. The student who successfully completes the course will be able to demonstrate physical assessment techniques, interviewing skills and health risks assessment and utilize health care terminology as it relates to physical assessment.

Prerequisites: NUR 200, NUR 205, NUR 213 and CNA status

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Nursing


NUR 213 Basic Concepts of Pathophysiology – Fall

Credits: 4

Basic Concepts of Pathophysiology examines pathophysiological and psychological aspects of alterations in major body systems. Emphasis is on holistic nature of human responses to health alterations. Understanding disease processes promotes better decision making in assessing, planning, and implementing care of clients and is essential for professional nursing practice. The student who successfully completes this course will understand the holistic approach of human responses to health alterations of the major body systems.

Prerequisites: ENG 105, BIO 241, BIO 242 and CHEM 105

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Nursing


NUR 214 Basic Concepts of Pharmacology – Spring

Credits: 3

Basic concepts of pharmacology is a survey of medications typically used in the diagnosis, treatment, and prevention of disease. Consideration is given to indications for use, administration, absorption, action, metabolism, and excretion of drugs. Students will be able to apply the nursing process to the role the nurse takes in the administration, evaluation, and education in pharmacology.

Prerequisites: NUR 200, NUR 205, NUR 213 and is a service-learning course

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Nursing


NUR 301 Bridge to Professional Nursing – Fall (WI)

Credits: 5

Bridge to Professional Nursing is designed as a transition to baccalaureate nursing education. The student who successfully completes this course will be able to integrate the concepts of nursing, person, health, and environment into professional nursing practice.

Prerequisites: Completion of an ADN or Diploma nursing program and RN licensure.

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Nursing


NUR 305 Nursing Care of Adults I – Fall (WI)

Credits: 5

Nursing Care of Adults I focuses on professional nursing practices that assist clients to attain an optimal level of health by responding to their needs. The student will be able to identify factors that promote the client’s ability to perform self-care activities including basic human needs, individual client development and the environment and correlate nursing diagnoses, interventions and outcomes when caring for adult client experiencing changes in their health status. Students will be able to analyze situations in which ethical, legal, spiritual and cultural values are integrated into professional nursing practice

Prerequisites: NUR 206, NUR 208 and NUR 214.

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Nursing


NUR 306 Nursing Care of Mental Health Clients – Spring

Credits: 5

Nursing Care of Mental Health Clients focuses on professional nursing practice that assists the client and family who are experiencing conditions of altered stability and emotional disorders. The student who successfully completes this course will be able to integrate critical thinking, the nursing process, research and holistic practices as it pertains to care of clients with mental health disorders. Content includes specific client responses to developmental issues and disorders of eating, mood, thought, behavior, and substance abuse.

Prerequisites: NUR 305 and NUR 307

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Nursing


NUR 307 Nursing Care of Childbearing Families – Fall

Credits: 5

Nursing Care of Childbearing Families focuses on nursing students learning how to examine the health care needs of women and their families throughout the reproductive years. The student who successfully completes this course will be able to demonstrate critical thinking skills, integrate the nursing process into practice, utilize up to date research, and practice the art of holistic care. Content includes pre-pregnancy, pregnancy, childbirth, and post-partum and newborn states.

Prerequisites: NUR 206, NUR 208 and NUR 214

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Nursing


NUR 308 Nursing Care of Children – Spring

Credits: 5

Nursing Care of Children focuses on nursing students learning how to practice the art of nursing for children from birth through adolescence. The student who successfully completes this course will be able to demonstrate critical thinking skills, integrate the nursing process into practice, utilize up to date research, and practice the art of holistic care. Content includes support and education of the healthy child and family experiencing illness, and knowledge of child development.

Prerequisites: NUR 305 and NUR 307

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Nursing


NUR 405 Nursing Care in the Community – Fall

Credits: 4

Nursing Care in the Community focuses on professional nursing practice that assists the community as a client. Content includes concepts of environmental health, epidemiology and care of the community. The student will understand community as a client is defined as an individual, family, aggregate, or group. The student will be able to integrate critical thinking, the nursing process, research and holistic care as it pertains to the community.

Prerequisites: NUR 306 and NUR 308 or Completion of an ADN or Diploma nursing program and RN licensure

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Nursing


NUR 406 Nursing Care of Older Adults – Spring

Credits: 3

Nursing Care of the Older Adult focuses on professional nursing practice that takes a holistic approach to nursing care for the older population. Emphasis is on the integration of critical thinking, the nursing process, research, and holistic care. Content includes physical, psychological, social, cultural, spiritual, and economic aspects of aging. A strong foundation on the normal aging process leads to concepts in promoting health and wellness in addition to common health care problems among the elderly and their related nursing care. An overview of the latest thinking on current topics including chronic illness and end-of-life will be presented.

Prerequisites: NUR 405 and NUR 407 or completion of an ADN or diploma nursing program and RN licensure

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Nursing


NUR 407 Nursing Care of Adults II – Fall

Credits: 6

In Nursing Care of Adults II, students will be engaged in learning how individuals adapt to changes in health status when at risk due to development and environmental stressors. The student who successfully completes this course will be prepared for professional nursing practice as it relates to acute alterations in oxygenation, hematology, cardiac perfusion, and urinary function.

Prerequisites: NUR 306 and NUR 308

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Nursing


NUR 408 Nursing Care of Adults III – Spring

Credits: 6

In Nursing Care of Adults III, students will be engaged in learning how individuals adapt to changes in health status when at risk due to development and environmental stressors. The student who successfully completes this course will be prepared for professional nursing practice as it relates to acute alterations in elimination, digestion, metabolism, reproduction, mobility, and sensation.

Prerequisites: NUR 405 and NUR 407

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Nursing


NUR 410 Nursing Leadership and Management – Spring

Credits: 2

Nursing Leadership and Management focuses on the study of nursing organizational, leadership and management theories and their supporting concepts as they relate to professional nursing. The student will be able to integrate critical thinking, decision- making, delegation, communication, power and conflict resolution as it contributes to the leadership role of the professional nurse.

Prerequisites: NUR 405 and NUR 407 or Completion of an ADN or Diploma nursing program and RN licensure

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Nursing


NUR 411 Nursing Internship – Spring

Credits: 1

Nursing Internship is an independent internship occurring in a variety of health care settings to facilitate role transition from student to professional nurse and lifelong learning. Students who successfully complete this course will be able to apply knowledge gained from previous course work and demonstrate the ability to design, provide, manage, and coordinate care.

Prerequisites: NUR 405 and NUR 407

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Nursing


NUR 412 NCLEX-RN® Preparation – Spring

Credits: 1

NUR 412 NCLEX RN Preparation: NCLEX-RN (National Council Licensure Examination for Registered Nurses) preparation is designed to enhance the ability to meet the challenges of passing the Registered Nurse licensure examination. Students who successfully complete this course will be able to demonstrate the competencies needed to perform safely and effectively as a newly licensed, entry-level registered nurse. This class is restricted to the Pre-licensure BSN and LPN to BSN.

Prerequisites: NUR 405 and NUR 407

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Nursing


NUR 413 Nursing Research – Fall (WI)

Credits: 3

Nursing Research is an introduction to the concepts and process of research and Evidence-Based Practice (EBP) in nursing. The focus is on understanding research and its foundation for nursing practice. As a consumer of research, the student will be able to understand the various types of research, and which type is used for exploring different phenomena. The student will also be exposed to evidence based practice, and it’s importance in healthcare.

Prerequisites: NUR 306 and NUR 308, or completion of an ADN or diploma nursing program and RN licensure and math 171. Writing intensive course.

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Nursing


NUR 423 Advanced Pathophysiology

Credits: 4

Advanced Concepts of Pathophysiology examines pathophysiological and psychological aspects of alterations in major body systems. Emphasis is on the holistic nature of human responses to health alterations. Understanding disease processes promotes better decision making in assessing, planning, and implementing care of clients and is essential for professional nursing practice.

Prerequisites: Completion of an ADN or Diploma and RN licensure

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Nursing


PE 107 Dance and Movement

Credits: 3

Survey of dance and dance history with emphasis on the relationship of dance and dance forms to the societies in which they developed. Development of knowledge and skill in folk and square dances, American country dances and ballroom dancing, cultural influences of folk arts. Participation in a variety of dances for school and adult recreation and lecture.

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Education, Majors, Exercise Science and Wellness, Physical Education, Endorsements, Physical Education


PE 108 Dance and Movement for Music Majors

Credits: 2

Survey of dance and dance history with emphasis on the relationship of dance and dance forms to the societies in which they developed. Development of knowledge and skill in folk, American country dances and ballroom dancing, cultural influences of folk arts. Participation in a variety of dances for school and adult recreation.

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Education, Majors, Physical Education, Physical Education


PE 109 Functional Fitness & Personal Wellness

Credits: 0-1

The purpose of this class is to integrate principles of Personal Wellness into the Functional Movement Screen system (FMS) on an introductory level. Individuals will gain understanding of how concepts of Personal Wellness and the FMS system work together to promote overall health, injury prevention strategies, corrective exercise strategies and balanced wellness practices to help enhance personal fitness and health for a lifetime. This class is designed to provide basic knowledge, experience, practice and application of the FMS through in-class and experiential learning projects. The course will provide students with workplace-ready skills and resources in physical education, exercise science, sports medicine and personal health and wellness.

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Education, Majors, Physical Education, Endorsements, Physical Education


PE 122 Yoga

Credits: 0-1

This course is designed to introduce students to the basic asana (postures), breathing techniques and relaxation benefits of yoga. Students will learn via experience how intentional movement, coupled with breath work, can assist in stress-reduction, deeper relaxation and mental clarity.

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Education, Majors, Physical Education, Physical Education


PE 123 First Fit

Credits: 0-1

FIRST FIT is a basic physical fitness program for beginners and/or for individuals who need individualized fitness programming. Learning outcomes focus on the learning and application of corrective progressive exercise techniques and principles, physical readiness assessments, and fitness evaluation and training through an extensive diversified program. Participants will develop a personalized training log. Exercise Science and Wellness majors are encouraged to enroll in this course as an Exercise Science and Wellness Lab with the opportunity to enhance their pre-professional practices.

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Education, Majors, Physical Education, Physical Education


PE 125 Introduction to Exercise Science and Wellness

Credits: 3

The student will learn of the history, evolution and diversity of career opportunities in exercise science and wellness. This course will provide students with opportunities to discover and reflect on a broad field that includes aspiring vocations in sport, fitness, physical activity sciences as well as career areas in the profession (teaching), the discipline (scholarly), and the rapidly growing new professions (applied careers such as sports management). Students will understand what is involved in techniques of teaching exercise science and wellness, modern trends, and job market possibilities.

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Education, Majors, Exercise Science and Wellness


PE 133 Core n Tone

Credits: 0-1

CORE n TONE presents intermediate to advance individual and small group fitness sessions focused from the inner core to full body training experiences. CORE n TONE activities focus on refining exercise technique while conditioning through anaerobic and aerobic high intensity interval training. CORE n TONE includes physical readiness assessment, fitness evaluation and training. Participants will receive a personalized CORE n TONE training log.

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Education, Majors, Exercise Science and Wellness, Physical Education, Athletic Coaching, Health, Physical Education


PE 143 Prime Fit

Credits: 0-1

PRIME FIT presents intermediate to advance high intensity interval training fitness sessions focused on enhancing flexibility, balance, stability, steadiness and mobility based on core development, posture and building through full body training experiences. PRIME FIT activities focus on refining exercise technique while conditioning through anaerobic and aerobic body weight and suspension training; fitness sessions also includes strength, power, endurance, and stamina activities. PRIME FIT includes physical readiness assessment, fitness evaluation and training. Exercise Science and Wellness majors are encouraged to enroll in this course as an opportunity to enhance their pre-professional practices.

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Education, Majors, Exercise Science and Wellness, Physical Education, Athletic Coaching, Health


PE 212 Coaching Authorization

Credits: 4

This course meets the State of Iowa’s criteria to receive one’s coaching authorization. In this course the students will complete 10 contact hours of Theory of Coaching, five contact hours of Coaching Ethics, 10 contact hours of Anatomy and Function, 10 contact hours in Physical and Mental Development, and 20 contact hours in Prevention, Care and Treatment of Athletic Injuries. The student will receive the appropriate forms to submit to the State at the completion of this class.

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Education, Majors, Physical Education, Endorsements, Athletic Coaching, Physical Education


PE 221 Team Sports

Credits: 3

The students will learn the skills, rules and teaching techniques involved in Team Sports. They will understand how individuals learn and be able to communicate these skills as they teach each other and outside groups from the community.

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Education, Majors, Exercise Science and Wellness, Physical Education, Endorsements, Athletic Coaching, Physical Education


PE 223 Individual Sports

Credits: 3

The students will learn the skills, rules and teaching techniques involved in activities considered to be of an individual nature. They will understand how individuals learn and be able to communicate these skills as they teach each other and outside groups from the community.

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Education, Majors, Exercise Science and Wellness, Physical Education, Endorsements, Athletic Coaching, Physical Education


PE 225 Introduction to Physical Education

Credits: 3

The student will learn of the history of human movement, respective evolution of trends, and the influence towards lifestyle wellness including occupational opportunities in the greater world of physical education, exercise science, health, wellness and fitness. Students will understand what is involved in the techniques of teaching individuals and groups.

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Education, Majors, Exercise Science and Wellness, Physical Education, Endorsements, Athletic Coaching, Physical Education


PE 231 First Aid

Credits: 1

This is a basic first aid course. The students will learn how to treat various health problems including wound care through this course.

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Humanities, Division of Nursing, Division of Science, Psychology, Division of Business, Major, Business Administration, Minor, Business Administration, Economics, Division of Wesleyan Studies, Division of Education, Majors, Exercise Science and Wellness, Physical Education, Endorsements, Athletic Coaching, Health, Physical Education


PE 250 Motor Learning

Credits: 2

This course is designed to introduce the student to major concepts within motor control and motor learning across the human lifespan. Both neural and behavioral levels of analyses will be discussed. The course content is relevant to those who wish to better understand how we control our movements and for those who will be engaged in teaching motor skills, be that as an educator, therapist, trainer, or clinician.

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Education, Majors, Exercise Science and Wellness, Physical Education, Endorsements, Physical Education


PE 260 Scientific Aspects of Strength Development

Credits: 2

This course is designed to explore the nature of muscular strength and development utilizing the physiological principles of physical conditioning. This course provides the background for the students to successfully complete the Certified Strength and Conditioning; and Certified Personal Trainer exam offered by the National Strength and Conditioning Association. It provides students with practical experience at program design for a variety of populations.

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Education, Majors, Exercise Science and Wellness, Physical Education, Endorsements, Physical Education


PE 262 Athletic Coaching: Baseball and Softball

Credits: 2

The student will learn coaching techniques, theory, fundamentals, conditioning, strategies, practice setup, event preparation and rules according to their associations.

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Education, Majors, Exercise Science and Wellness, Physical Education, Endorsements, Athletic Coaching, Physical Education


PE 264 Athletic Coaching: Track and Field

Credits: 1

The student will learn coaching techniques, theory, fundamentals, conditioning, strategies, practice setup, event preparation and rules according to their associations.

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Education, Majors, Exercise Science and Wellness, Physical Education, Endorsements, Athletic Coaching, Physical Education


PE 266 Athletic Coaching: Volleyball

Credits: 1

The student will learn coaching techniques, theory, fundamentals, conditioning, strategies, practice setup, event preparation and rules according to their associations.

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Education, Majors, Exercise Science and Wellness, Physical Education, Endorsements, Athletic Coaching, Physical Education


PE 267 Athletic Coaching: Football

Credits: 2

The student will learn coaching techniques, theory, fundamentals, conditioning, strategies, practice setup, event preparation and rules according to their associations.

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Education, Majors, Exercise Science and Wellness, Physical Education, Endorsements, Athletic Coaching, Physical Education


PE 268 Athletic Coaching: Basketball (Coed)

Credits: 2

The student will learn coaching techniques, theory, fundamentals, conditioning, strategies, practice setup, event preparation and rules according to their associations.

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Education, Majors, Exercise Science and Wellness, Physical Education, Endorsements, Athletic Coaching, Physical Education


PE 269 Athletic Coaching: Soccer (Coed)

Credits: 1

The student will learn coaching techniques, theory, fundamentals, conditioning, strategies, practice setup, event preparation and rules according to their associations.

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Majors, Exercise Science and Wellness, Physical Education, Endorsements, Athletic Coaching, Physical Education


PE 270 Theory of Coaching

Credits: 2

An orientation to coaching. Students will learn a broad philosophic treatment of sports, principles and practices that are common to all coaching areas. They will learn about ethics involved in coaching. This is a coed class.

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Education, Majors, Exercise Science and Wellness, Physical Education, Endorsements, Athletic Coaching, Physical Education


PE 290 Curriculum Instruction & Design PE K-12

Credits: 2

Students will study the skills and techniques that successful teachers use to make classes appropriate and beneficial for instruction. Course will include curriculum design, movement education through the integration of instructional practices, teaching strategies, knowledge of adaptations to physical activity, sequencing of developmentally appropriate content and activities, and assessment practices.

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Education, Majors, Physical Education, Endorsements, Physical Education


PE 341 Movement Exploration and Adapted Physical Education

Credits: 3

The students will look at and discuss the topics of developmental, remedial, and corrective programs for physical education. Students will also learn and understand the subject of motor learning or achievement exploration as related to children and youth.

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Education, Majors, Physical Education, Endorsements, Physical Education


PE 352 Kinesiology (WI)

Credits: 3

The students will learn, through a detailed study, about the muscle and articulations of the human body. They will learn and understand the movements and actions of the muscles and articulations in relation to good posture and proper application of skills.

Prerequisites: BIO 241, English 105 & 201

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Education, Majors, Exercise Science and Wellness, Physical Education, Endorsements, Athletic Coaching, Health, Physical Education


PE 356 Principles, Assessment and Research in Physical Education

Credits: 3

Students will be able to define physical education and its philosophy and the criteria of related sciences in dictating guiding principles for a program of physical education. They will collect and utilize date to compare subjects tested to the norms. They will read and evaluate research as consumers and learn to read research critically. The students will also learn and discuss techniques of evaluation related to achievement of students from grades 7 – 12.

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Education, Majors, Exercise Science and Wellness, Physical Education, Endorsements, Physical Education


PE 381 Fitness Evaluation and Training

Credits: 3

This class will give the students an opportunity to review and study in depth, the theories and research that have been learned in other classes. Students will be able to put their knowledge to use as they will apply assessments to various individuals and then set up a program for them to follow. The students will supervise their programs and re-assess them at the end of a set period of time.

Prerequisites: Junior or higher standing

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Education, Majors, Exercise Science and Wellness, Physical Education, Physical Education


PE 398 Practicum in Exercise Science

Credits: 3

Students will apply what they have learned in various classes to making plans and leading others in exercise programs. This allows the student in Exercise Science to have some practical experience.

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Education, Majors, Exercise Science and Wellness, Physical Education, Physical Education


PE 482 Prevention, Care and Treatment of Athletic Injuries

Credits: 3

Students will learn about the basics of prevention of injuries, the type of injuries and how to care for and treat them. Students will learn basic anatomy as it applies to athletic injuries. They will understand the knowledge of learning anatomy and how it applies to understanding injury and injury prevention.

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Education, Majors, Exercise Science and Wellness, Physical Education, Endorsements, Athletic Coaching, Physical Education


PE 484 Physiology of Exercise

Credits: 3

The student will learn, understand and apply the knowledge how exercise affects the physiology of the human body. They will learn how nutrition, exercise and rest affects the human body before, during and after exercise. This will lead to an understanding of physical conditioning and weight control during exercise.

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Education, Majors, Exercise Science and Wellness, Physical Education, Endorsements, Health, Physical Education


PE 493 Organization, Administration and Curriculum Development of Secondary Physical Education and Athletics

Credits: 3

The students will learn and discuss the philosophy, aim and national standards of physical education in developing programs in curricula in secondary physical education. This course is designed so the students will become familiar with and be able to use the standards and policies involved in organization, management, curriculum and supervision of the secondary physical education program (5-12) and athletics.

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Education, Majors, Physical Education, Endorsements, Physical Education


PE 498 Internship in Exercise Science and Wellness

Credits: 6

This is where the students get to use the knowledge and skills they have learned and developed through the course work of their major. It is used as practical experience in the “real world.” It is also used to discover potential career opportunities for the student in Exercise Science and Wellness.

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Education, Majors, Exercise Science and Wellness, Physical Education, Endorsements, Athletic Coaching, Health, Physical Education


PHIL 201 Introduction to Philosophy

Credits: 3

An introduction to the ways in which humanity makes sense of life, and the ways in which this is done. The nature of philosophy or self-conscious thinking is explored. Evaluation is given to competing positions with a view to developing an adequate philosophy of life. Successful students will: demonstrate general critical thinking/ reading skills; engage in reasoned discussion of issues/topics with respect for other points of view; apply civic values to contemporary issues and problems; develop a practical model for learning at the college level.

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Humanities


PHIL 215 Ethics for Life and Career

Credits: 3

This course explores the ethical dimensions of human experience, especially with respect to work, professions, careers, and vocations. What is demanded of us as we enter into various careers? What would excellence in these fields require? Are there basic rules governing each profession, and if so, what broader goals do these rules serve? Are there basic rules or principles guiding human life in general? In all of these spheres of life, what does it mean to be good?

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Humanities


PHIL 230 Critical Reasoning

Credits: 3

This course focuses on the various skills required for reasoning well, because reasoning poorly can undermine one’s life. The skills required for reasoning well include logic, careful attention to language, a sense of relevance, clarity of expression, discrimination among causes, listening, analysis of complex ideas, and self-examination. Students will examine a wide variety of case studies, arguments, issues, and theories in order to develop the critical skills outlined above. In order to develop their own intellectual and rhetorical skills, students will offer their own arguments, engage in debates, and construct their own philosophy of critical thinking.

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Humanities


PHIL 306 Philosophy of Religion

Credits: 3

This course explores issues that arise when human beings reflect on religious experience. Given religious experience, what does it mean? What is its status in relation to other aspects of life, and what are its basic elements and foundations? And what is religious experience really about—God, human needs, social habits, spirituality, all of the above? Students will: explore a wide range of views, assessing their various strengths and weaknesses; demonstrate development of general critical thinking/reading skills; examine the roles that religious values play in human life; examine the ways religious ideas address the concerns of human life and; and develop skills for communicating their basic values and views to others.

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Humanities


PHIL 380 Topics in Philosophy

Credits: 3

Courses providing students with an opportunity to study ideas, movements and institutions in philosophy not ordinarily covered extensively in other courses. Possible topics include: Psychology of Religion, Philosophy of History, and Aesthetics.

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Humanities


PHYS 220 General Physics II - Spring

Credits: 4

A continuation of PHYS 210. Deals principally with electricity and magnetism, electromagnetic phenomena, light, ray optics, and physical optics.

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Science


PSYC 131 General Psychology

Credits: 3

This course provides a broad overview of the science of psychology including its main sub-disciplines, such as abnormal psychology, motivation, personality, memory, learning, emotions, therapy and biopsychology. By completing this course, students should be able to demonstrate an increased understanding of themselves and others, show appreciation for the nature and range of the science of psychology, identify the career possibilities that are available in the field of psychology and show themselves proficient in the scientific methods employed in psychological research.

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Science, Psychology


PSYC 205 The Family - Spring

Credits: 3

This course examines the basic dynamics of family relationships from both psychological and sociological perspectives. By completing this course, students should be able to explain the major family structures and the family life cycle, identify typical patterns that develop within families, show proficiency in the practical skills for handling family conflict and describe the reciprocal influence of family life, culture and society.

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Science, Psychology, Endorsements, Health, K-8 Social Studies


PSYC 209 Social Psychology - Spring

Credits: 3

The purpose of this course is to introduce the field of social psychology. There are three major sub-goals: (1) To introduce the ways in which social psychologists think about and approach the world. One of the recurring themes will be that social psychology relies on experimental studies of the social processes that surround us in everyday life. The results of such experiments sometimes do, and sometimes do not, support intuitions that people might have about social behavior. (2) To introduce the body of knowledge and underlying principles that currently exist in the field. (3) To encourage thought about the implications of social-psychological research for daily life.

Prerequisites: SOC 100 or PSYC 131

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Science, Psychology


PSYC 240 Theories of Personality - Fall

Credits: 3

This course focuses on the principles and theories of normal personality development and adjustment, with emphasis on stress, coping skills and communication. By completing this course, students should be able to explain how to cope with common problems encountered at each stage of the adult life-cycle, demonstrate an awareness of how to derive greater fulfillment from his/her relationships with others, show improved communication skills by learning the basic ways people communicate, and identify his/her own needs and motives, and analyze how these impact on our relationships by discussing the role of childhood experiences, physical constitution, and the environment in forming our needs and motives

Prerequisites: PSYC 131

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Science, Psychology


PSYC 251 Developmental Psychology

Credits: 3

This course considers the development of an individual from conception through adolescence. By completing this course, students should be able to describe their own childhood and explain the influence it has had on shaping their adult personality, identify the main content areas in the study of human development and describe and critique the impact of governmental policies on children so as to become informed participants in shaping public policy.

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Science, Psychology, Majors, Early Childhood Education, Physical Education, Endorsements, Athletic Coaching, Early Childhood Education, Health, K-8 English/Language Arts, K-8 Social Studies, Physical Education


PSYC 271 Statistics for the Behavioral Sciences - Fall

Credits: 3

Students will be introduced to statistical techniques used to conduct behavioral science research. Methods are presented which make possible inferences about a population from knowledge of small samples. Methods of measurement and techniques available to summarize sets of data will be discussed. The course will stress an understanding of conceptual issues involved in the selection of statistical methods rather than memorization of formulas.

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Science, Psychology


PSYC 310 Introduction to Forensic Psychology – Fall

Credits: 3

This course is a critical examination of the relationships between psychological research, practice, and theory and the law and legal system. Topics that may be considered include standards and assessments of legal competencies, mental state defenses, civil commitment, violence risk assessments, eyewitness identifications, (false) confessions, deception detection, jury behavior, child custody disputes, the roles of psychologists in the courtroom, and ethical issues in psychology and the law. By completing this course, the student will be able to demonstrate the understanding of how psychology and law combine and answer psycho-legal questions as well as apply the appropriate ethical code and guidelines within forensic psychology.

Prerequisites: PSYC 131; recommended prerequisite: PSYC 361 or PSYC 324 and CJ 231

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Science, Psychology


PSYC 324 Child Psychopathology - Fall

Credits: 3

The purpose of this course is to help students understand the continuum of normal and abnormal human development. The course approaches the topic by combining developmental and abnormal psychology perspectives. Students will be able to describe, discuss, implement, and appraise the major theories of the causes and treatment of developmental psychopathology. They will gain knowledge of the process of evaluation, diagnosis, and treatment of childhood disorders. In addition, students will gain an understanding of the influence of biological, cultural, and familial contexts on human development.

Prerequisites: PSYC 131 or PSYC 251

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Science, Psychology


PSYC 326 Introduction to Counseling - Spring

Credits: 3

This course covers the basic principles and techniques of counseling. By completing this course, students will be able to articulate the major approaches to counseling (e.g., action-oriented therapies, experiential/emotive-oriented therapies, cognitive-behavioral therapies, group approaches, and systems approaches), demonstrate specific skills commonly used in counseling, understand common issues typically faced by counselors, appreciate the mechanics of the healing process, and understand career possibilities in the field of counseling.

Prerequisites: PSYC 324 or PSYC 361 (or permission of instructor)

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Science, Psychology


PSYC 336 Motivation and Emotion - Spring

Credits: 3

The purpose of this course is to help students learn ways of thinking usefully and critically (i.e., carefully) about human behavior, through understanding motivation and emotion. Understanding motivation and emotion can aid one in thinking usefully and critically about human behavior - something useful not only in psychology and human services professions, but in many areas of human life. Students will be able to describe, discuss, implement, and appraise the major theories of motivation. In addition, students will be able to identify the major causal indicators known to affect emotion/mood.

Prerequisites: PSYC 131

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Science, Psychology


PSYC 361 Abnormal Psychology - Spring

Credits: 3

This course surveys a range of major pathological behavioral patterns identified by the DSM-IV-TR and discusses the theories and diagnoses of these patterns. By completing this course, students will be able to differentiate the major models of abnormal behavior and their implied methods of intervention, identify the basic types of mental disorders, and explain the major issues confronted in abnormal psychology.

Prerequisites: PSYC 131 or PSYC 251

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Science, Psychology


PSYC 365 Psychology of Addiction

Credits: 3

This is a multidimensional course that focuses on the psychological, biological, social and family system variables found within addiction. By completing this course, students should be able to describe and discuss the facts and concepts of addiction, identify the functions, meanings, models and at-risk factors of addiction, recognize and describe the effects of family dynamics in the arena of dependency, and describe interactions within interventions and treatments of addiction.

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Science, Psychology


PSYC 366 Death and Dying

Credits: 3

This course is designed to provide an opportunity to explore and examine a multitude of concepts involved with death and dying. Theoretical and philosophical consider- ations will be addressed, as well as moral, ethical and religious aspects that surround the subject of death. By completing this course, students will be able to describe and discuss the historical and contemporary implications and aspects of death and dying, identify basic legal and moral considerations related to death, recognize values in relationship to death, dying and life, and identify the characteristics associated with grief, as well as the methods in which to assist the bereaved.

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Science, Psychology


PSYC 367 Cognitive Psychology - Fall

Credits: 3

This course provides an in-depth exploration of human cognition, focusing on both classic and current issues. The study of cognition relies heavily on experimental research designed to test models and theories of cognitive processes, and students will explore both behavioral and neuropsychological approaches to data and theory. Topics will include attention, perception, multiple memory systems, encoding and retrieval processes, the role of knowledge, language, and reasoning.

Prerequisites: PSYC 131

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Science, Psychology


PSYC 372 Positive Psychology - Spring

Credits: 3

This course explores how and why people thrive and experience well-being. Positive psychology is the scientific approach to understanding people’s strengths and promoting positive functioning. Students will be able to describe, discuss, implement, and appraise the major theories of the factors related to psychological well-being. In addition, students will gain an understanding of the influence of biological, personal, cultural, and social contexts on human well-being.

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Science, Psychology


PSYC 374 Psychology of Gender - Spring

Credits: 3

This course introduces students to psychological theories and research exploring issues relevant to gender, including gender development and construction, gender stereotypes, gender discrimination, sexuality, and relationships. This course provides an overview of gender similarities and differences across a range of important life domains. Students learn to recognize the impact of gender in everyday life, as well as its role in society. Students are challenged to explore the complexity of gender.

Prerequisites: Offered spring alternate years

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Science, Psychology


PSYC 377 History and Systems of Psychology - Fall

Credits: 3

This course serves as the capstone course for the major. In it, students study the historical development of the discipline of psychology as well as contemporary systems and issues. By completing this course, students should be able to explain how the historical development of the field of psychology has led to its current state and the probable future directions of the field. The student will also be able to identify current issues in the field of psychology and key philosophical questions, such as free will versus determinism; materialism versus supernaturalism; the descriptive versus prescriptive approach; the relationship between subjectivity and objectivity; and the nature of the self/consciousness.

Prerequisites: PSYC 131 and Junior or Senior-level standing

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Science, Psychology


PSYC 380 Topics in Behavioral Sciences

Credits: 3

Selected topics in the behavioral sciences. This course will give the students an opportunity to focus on specific areas of psychology that are not covered in depth by other courses. Offerings will depend upon student and faculty interest and faculty availability. Possible topics include: Attitude and Attitude Change, Relationships, Group-based behavior, and Prosocial Behavior.

Prerequisites: PSYC 131

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Science, Psychology


PSYC 382 Biopsychology - Spring

Credits: 3

This course studies the development, structure, and functioning of the central nervous system in the context of its relations to principles and theories of human behavior. By completing this course, students will be able to identify the major centers of the brain and basic mechanics of brain functioning, explain the complexity of the memory process and how the mind and body affect each other, and summarize the dominant biological processes that interact with the mind to influence perception, emotion, and behavior.

Prerequisites: PSYC 131; also recommended prerequisite: BIO 211 or BIO 241 or CHEM 175

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Science, Psychology


PSYC 440, 441, 442 Career Applications in Psychology

Credits: 2-6

This course permits practical work experience in psychology for students who are unable to complete six hours of internship in a single semester due to class schedule or course load. The number of hours needed to complete credit hours in Career Applications will be the same as those required to complete internship credit hours. The difference is that Career Applications will spread the work over more weeks. Students successfully completing the course will demonstrate ability to apply psychology coursework to their work experience.

Prerequisites: Junior or senior standing and unanimous approval of the Science Division

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Science, Psychology


PSYC 497 Independent Study in Psychology

Credits: 1-3

This course enables students who are self-motivated to explore in depth a specific topic of interest to them that is not covered in other courses within the psychology major. Students will participate in periodic conferences and submit reports and papers. By completing this course, students will be able to demonstrate proficiency in their chosen topic of study.

Prerequisites: Junior or senior standing, Consent of instructor required

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Science, Psychology


PSYC 498 Internship in Psychology

Credits: 6-12

The internship allows for practical work experience in psychology. Upon successful completion of this internship, students will be able to describe their work experience, connect their work experience to their psychology coursework and articulate orally and in writing what they learned in their field placement.

Prerequisites: Junior or senior standing

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Science, Psychology


PSYC 499 Psychology Senior Seminar - Fall

Credits: 2

This course is designed as a capstone experience, which means that its purpose is to both unify and provide a broader context for knowledge about the field of psychology gained throughout the undergraduate years. Part of this process is exploring connections between both (1) oneself and the field of psychology and (2) the rest of the world and psychology. Students will achieve these goals by completing a senior research thesis, and connecting their previous course work with their Internship through discussion with their peers.

Prerequisites: Senior standing and PSYC 271 and SSCI 347

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Science, Psychology


REL 101 Introduction to the Bible as Literature

Credits: 3

An overview of the sacred texts of Jews and Christians. Inspiration, Creation, Salvation, and other biblical themes will be discussed, as well as key persons and events, such as Moses, Jesus, etc. Part of the course will be spent analyzing the literary genres used by biblical writers as a means of gaining insight into the kind of “truth” religious texts claim, and the relation of that truth to historical and scientific data. A third emphasis will be on the way biblical ideas have been appropriated in modern culture ( e.g. in religion, art and politics). Students who successfully complete this course will be able to: summarize the storyline of the Bible, identify the main characters, explain the important developments in the biblical portrayal of God and salvation, compare the biblical literature with corresponding works from ancient history, and summarize and critique the way the Bible is used in the modern world.

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Humanities


REL 102 Introduction to Religion

Credits: 3

This course explores issues that arise when human beings reflect on religious experience. Given religious experience, what does it mean? What is its status in relation to other aspects of life, and what are its basic elements and foundations? And what is religious experience really about—God, human needs, social habits, spirituality, all of the above? Students explore a wide range of views, assessing their various strengths and weaknesses. As a result of this course students will be able to: describe the various theories of the origin of the belief in God, explain why religion has persisted in spite of modern science, evaluate the benefits and liabilities of organized religion in the modern world, and offer a personal theory of the nature of religion.

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Humanities


REL 150 Introduction to World Religions

Credits: 3

An overview of the world’s major religious traditions, including the Eastern traditions of Hinduism, Jainism, Buddhism, Taoism, Confucianism, and the Western traditions of Judaism, Christianity, and Islam. Students will think empathetically and critically about religious claims, compare and critique major beliefs and practices of the religions studied, and reflect on the significance of religion in contemporary life.

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Humanities


REL 201 Introduction to the Hebrew Bible

Credits: 3

A study of Old Testament belief, literature, history and thought. The development of key personalities and religious themes and their influence in world culture are considered. Completion of this course will enable students to describe the content of the Old Testament literature and especially the changes in the conception of God as the Old Testament story progresses. They will also be able to explain the significance of the major events and non-biblical religions of the period for biblical religion, as well as demonstrate proficiency in the use of some of the critical tools used to place the Old Testament into its literary, cultural, historical and religious context.

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Humanities


REL 202 Introduction to the New Testament

Credits: 3

A study of the beliefs, literature, history and thought of the New Testament. Attention is given to the ministry of Jesus and the development of the Christian community, as well as to the influence of the New Testament in world culture. Completion of this course will enable students to describe the content and forms of New Testament Literature, outline the history of the Greco-Roman world during the 1st and 2nd Centuries CE, identify the main features of Greco-Roman religion and Judaism during this period, use some of the critical tools available to place the New Testament writings in their historical context, and clarify some of the main ways the New Testament influences modern life.

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Humanities


REL 265 War and Peace

Credits: 3

This course examines philosophical questions of war and peace, including the role of religions in making war and peace. It will consider the potential for both violence and peacemaking within several religious traditions, as well as secular and philosophical ideologies. Students will be able to reflect on the question of just and unjust wars, evaluate the ideas of pacifism and its alternatives, and consider how religion might be a resource for peacemaking.

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Humanities


REL 300 Religion in Western Civilization

Credits: 3

Presents an historical survey of religious practices, beliefs, and narratives in western civilization. Examines the major ways in which three western religions—Judaism, Christianity, and Islam—have responded to important historical crises, with special focus on how sacred stories have shaped these responses. As a result of this course, students will be able to identify the characteristics that all world religions share, explain the impact of social and scientific developments on the study of religion, compare and critique the major practices and beliefs of the Judaism, Christianity and Islam, and trace the historical development of each.

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Humanities


REL 302 Church History

Credits: 3

Survey of the development of Christianity from a small Jewish sect on the frontier of the Roman Empire to the world’s largest religion. Emphasis is on the major events, people and ideas that shaped Christianity’s past and provide models for its future. As a result of this course, students will be able to identify some of the most important events and personalities in Church History, explain their significance for modern Christianity and offer an evaluation of modern church experience and practice in light of this history.

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Humanities


REL 305 History of Christian Thought

Credits: 3

This course examines the development of Christian thought from its origins to the present. Students examine how Christian thought both shapes and responds to its historical context. Emphasis is on several key periods: Early fathers, Late Medieval, Reformation, and 19th century. Students will trace key themes and debates across this history, e.g., Church and State, Christology, Salvation, Revelation and Knowledge, and Christian Experience. As a result of this course, students will be able to describe the beliefs of some of the most important Christian thinkers, identify the various historical and modern trends in Christian thought, explain the implications of the history of diversity of Christian thought for modern Christian experience, and propose their own Christian view that embraces both the diversity and unity of Christian faith.

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Humanities


REL 306 Philosophy of Religion

Credits: 3

This course explores issues that arise when human beings reflect on religious experience. Given religious experience, what does it mean? What is its status in relation to other aspects of life, and what are its basic elements and foundations? And what is religious experience really about—God, human needs, social habits, spirituality, all of the above? Students will: explore a wide range of views, assessing their various strengths and weaknesses; demonstrate development of general critical hinking/reading skills; examine the roles that religious values play in human life; examine the ways religious ideas address the concerns of human life and; and develop skills for communicating their basic values and views to others.

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Humanities


REL 380 Topics in Religion

Credits: 3

Courses providing students with an opportunity to study ideas, movements and institutions in religion not ordinarily covered extensively in other courses. Possible topics include: Historical Jesus, Dead Sea Scrolls, Apocalyptic, Mystical Religion, American Religion, etc.

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Humanities


REL 440, 441, 442 Career Applications

Credits: 2-6

This course permits practical work experience in religion for students who are unable to complete six hours of internship in a single semester due to class schedule or course load. The number of hours needed to complete credit hours in Career Applications will be the same as those required to complete internship credit hours. The difference is that Career applications will spread the work over more weeks.

Prerequisites: Junior or senior standing and unanimous approval of the Science Division.

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Humanities


REL 497 Independent Study in Religion

Credits: 1-3

This course is designed for advanced students who wish to research and write a paper on a specific topic or do a special project in religion.

Prerequisites: Advanced standing, a written project proposal, and permission of instructor.

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Humanities


REL 498 Internship in Religion

Credits: 6

The internship allows for practical work experience in religion.

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Humanities


SCI 205 Elementary Astronomy

Credits: 4

A beginning course in astronomy. Topics to be studied include the motions of the earth and moon; time measurements; the planets; elementary techniques of measuring stellar distances, diameters, brightness; stellar evolution; galactic structure and cosmology.

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Science


SCI 206 Physical Science

Credits: 4

Selected concepts underlying present understanding of the physical science. Topics include motion and Newton’s Laws, energy, electricity and magnetism, chemical structure and reactions, and elements of astronomy, geology and metrology as time permits. Lecture demonstration and laboratory experience is included.

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Science


SCI 342 Earth Science

Credits: 3

An integration of geology and meteorology, in which the structure and development of the Earth will be emphasized.

Prerequisites: 4 hours of science

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Science


SM 320 Sport Governance

Credits: 3

Various governing agencies in sport, including those at the high school, collegiate, professional, and international levels will be studied, emphasizing investigation of the organizational structure, authority, membership, and influence of these sport governing bodies. The course will also focus on ethical and social problems in the contemporary sport industry and theoretical models available for analyzing these problems.

Ideal for: Courses, Division of Business, Business Administration


SOC 100 Introduction to Sociology

Credits: 3

An introduction to the basic concepts, principles, and theories of sociology. Special attention will be given to examination of individuals and groups in society; social class and conflict; social institutions such as family, education, religion, political organization; and social change. Students who successfully complete the course will be able to explain the above-mentioned social topics and to analyze the dynamics of various social situations.

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Science, Early Childhood Education, Endorsements, Early Childhood Education, K-8 Social Studies


SOC 205 The Family

Credits: 3

See PSYC 205 The Family

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Science, Endorsements, Health, K-8 Social Studies


SOC 230 Introduction to Social Work

Credits: 3

Survey of the field of social work. Types and range of “helping” programs under both public and private auspices. After successfully completing the course, students will be able to describe the field of social work and identify its various dimensions.

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Science


SOC 243 Social Problems

Credits: 3

This course is designed to present an enlightened analytical review, understanding, and interpretation of contemporary social problems within the context of broad social and structural forces that make America what it is today. Emphasis is on the links between specific modern social problems and broader structural issues of inequality and the economic priorities in the United States today. Strategies for dealing with or solving social problems will be explored. Those who successfully complete the course will be able to identify and analyze the elements of most of the major social problems, especially in the United States.

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Science


SOC 310 Race and Ethnicity

Credits: 3

This course will discuss the concepts of race, ethnicity, dominant group vs. the minority group status, human diversity as well as the concepts of discrimination, racism, attitudes, prejudice and stereotyping in this concept. It will also discuss various racial, ethnic, religious, nationality, linguistic, and cultural groups in the U.S. in particular, and the human diversity all over the world in general.

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Science


SOC 320 Social Organization

Credits: 3

A study of the structures and processes of social organization – from the small group to complex bureaucratic institutions. Attention will be devoted to exploring the nature of life in an “organizational society” and the relationship of organizations to their social, cultural, political, economic, and natural environment. Those who successfully complete the course will be able to identify basic principles of social organizations, as well as to analyze and evaluate specific organizations.

Prerequisites: SOC 100

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Science


SOC 380 Topics in Behavioral Science

Credits: 3

Selected topics in the areas of the behavioral sciences. This course will give the students an opportunity to study in some depth theories and research on topics which are generally not covered by the listed Sociology courses in this catalog in detail. Offerings will depend upon student and faculty interest, and faculty availability. Possible topics include: minority problems, science, technology, and social change, migration in America. Students successfully completing the course will be able to demonstrate understanding of the particular issue and the major concepts in the field.

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Science


SOC 420 Sociological Theory

Credits: 3

Study of the major classical and contemporary theories of society and social behavior, involving reading and discussion of the writings of major sociological theorists. Includes comparison of theoretical positions relative to location and cultural backgrounds of the theorists. Students successfully completing the course will be able to identify, compare and evaluate the major theoretical perspectives and the major sociological theories.

Prerequisites: SOC 100, or permission of the instructor

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Science


SOC 497 Independent Study in Sociology

Credits: 1-3

Periodic conferences, reports, and papers.

Prerequisites: Consent of instructor required.

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Science


SPED 297 Career Development & Transition for Students with Disabilities

Credits: 3

Legal requirements, career education models and interagency agreements for transition are discussed. Students will identify critical areas related to transition planning, community resources, and components of the IEP related to transition. Students will create an individual transition plan for a real or fictitious student that illustrates the concepts learned.

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Education, Majors, Endorsements, Instructional Strategist I: Mild & Moderate


SPED 306 Collaboration and the Family

Credits: 3

This course will focus on the early childhood educator and special educator’s role in the collaboration process and how it relates to: relationships with families of young children and students with disabilities, the general education process of schools, and with community agencies. Students will present an in-service for general educators demonstrating their understanding for the need for collaboration. This course is for students seeking early childhood education endorsement, elementary special education endorsement or elementary health endorsement only.

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Education, Majors, Early Childhood Education, Endorsements, Health


SPED 341 Characteristics of Special Education Students

Credits: 3

This course provides students with an overview of basic concepts and issues related to students with disabilities. Issues and best practices in special education services today are discussed, and will focus on both the similarities and differences among labeled and non-labeled students. Students will demonstrate their skill at developing appropriate individualized and classroom instructional strategies to address these differences.

Prerequisites: EDUC 301 Education of Exceptional Persons, EDUC 301

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Education, Majors, Endorsements, Reading


SPED 342 Diagnosis and Assessment of Students with Disabilities

Credits: 3

This course is designed to provide the student with knowledge and skills required for assessing diverse populations of mildly/moderately disabled school-age students using formal and informal assessment techniques. The course also provides knowledge and skills required for linking assessment findings to instructional planning, including development of the Individualized Education Program. Students will administer and interpret various assessments.

Prerequisites: EDUC 301 Education of Exceptional Persons, SPED 341 Characteristics of Special Education Students, SPED 344 Methods and Teaching Strategies for Students with Disabilities, EDUC 301, SPED 341, SPED 344

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Education, Majors, Endorsements


SPED 344 Methods and Teaching Strategies for Students with Disabilities

Credits: 3

This course introduces teachers to the educational needs of students with disabilities. Emphasis is placed on procedures for effective academic, behavioral and social integration of these children in the general education classroom. Additionally, this course is designed to increase awareness of students with special needs, and to assist teachers/prospective teachers in enhancing their general or special education classroom instructional strategies in dealing with individual students and differentiated instruction. Students will demonstrate the use of various research-based approaches to instruction.

Prerequisites: EDUC 301 Education of Exceptional Persons, EDUC 301

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Education, Majors, Endorsements


SPED 442 Practicum in Elementary Special Education (K-8)

Credits: 3-6

A full-time program of experience in elementary school special education. Students will present artifacts at the end of their practicum that demonstrate their ability to apply information learned in their coursework.

Prerequisites: All coursework listed on the Special Education Checklist and Full Admission to Teacher Education Program.

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Education, Majors, Endorsements


SPED 492 Practicum in Secondary Special Education (5-12)

Credits: 3-6

A full-time program of experience in secondary special education. Students will present artifacts at the end of their practicum that demonstrate their ability to apply information learned in their coursework.

Prerequisites: All coursework listed on the Special Education Checklist and Full Admission to Teacher Education Program.

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Education, Majors, Endorsements


SSCI 347 Research Methods - Spring

Credits: 3

This course teaches the basic principles and practices of the scientific method as applied to the behavioral sciences. By completing this course, students will be able to conduct a research project through all of its stages, including research design, implementation, analysis of results, and draft of a research paper. Students should also demonstrate proficiency in the broad research skills necessary for creating and testing hypotheses and in the evaluation of research in business, economics, psychology, sociology, criminal justice, education and biology.

Prerequisites: PSYC 271

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Science


SSCI 547 Research Methods

Credits: 3

This course teaches the basic principles and practices of the scientific method as applied to the behavioral sciences. By completing this course, students will be able to conduct a research project through all of its stages, including research design, implementation, analysis of results, and draft of a research paper. Students should also demonstrate proficiency in the broad research skills necessary for creating and testing hypotheses and in the evaluation of research in business, economics, psychology, sociology, criminal justice, education and biology.

Prerequisites: Standing Bachelor’s degree

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Science


WS 100 Wesleyan Seminar - Fall

Credits: 3

This course focuses on the academic study of Wesleyan theology as it relates to social justice and servant leadership. Aspects of the history of Iowa Wesleyan University relevant to particular themes of social justice will be explored. In addition, social justice themes in the areas of human, economic, and environmental issues will be related to current topics (e.g., women’s rights to education in today’s world). Instructors will guide learning about issues involved in social justice and human welfare in the local, regional, and global community, both in current and historical contexts. The course includes instruction about academic service-learning and completion of an academic- service project. This academic learning will be augmented by a required lab that includes workshops led by resource staff on campus and invited speakers. The lab will offer instruction in accessing University resources, developing social and academic strategies for success, and participating effectively within the Iowa Wesleyan University community. Students will understand and apply Iowa Wesleyan University’s Life Skills. Students will understand and apply strategies to enhance the well-being and success of the student, within the eight domains of wellness: social, emotional, physical, occupational, intellectual, environmental, financial, and spiritual.

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Wesleyan Studies


WS 110 Career Topics: Nursing at a Glance

Credits: 1

This course is designed to discuss the many roles nurses fill in today’s society. Students will learn that nursing is an international career which influences the health of populations. Discussion of the various specialties within the profession and graduate school will be explored. Learning what skills are important to be successful in the nursing program at Iowa Wesleyan University will also be discussed

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Wesleyan Studies


WS 300 Global Issues

Credits: 3

Upon satisfactory completion of this course, students will have a variety of perspectives on global events and issues and will understand the impact of their actions or inaction as global citizens.

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Wesleyan Studies


WS 310 Leadership and Service

Credits: 3

The Goal of WS 310 is to inform students about the value of servant-leader- ship and provide practical, experiential, and reflective lessons for students to become better servant-leaders. During the course students will model servant- leadership through a service-learning experience, explore connections between leadership theories and practice in discussions and reflective assignments, ap- preciate the role of servant-leadership in their professional and personal lives, and stimulate a goal-oriented vision of service and leadership for their future

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Wesleyan Studies


WS 315 Social Justice and Service

Credits: 3

Social Justice and Service will examine important issues of social justice and engage students in critical reflection on their role in being a social change agent. This is an experiential course that immerses students in face-to-face encounters with social justice issues by serving marginalized people groups in an urban or other setting and serving alongside other social justice advocates. Through this course students will be able to identify how social identities impact view of others, gain an understanding of the complex issues that con- tribute to oppression of marginalized people, including prejudice, and develop skills to create strategies and environments that advocate for the prosperity of others.

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Wesleyan Studies


WS 320 Leadership and Service

Credits: 3

Through this 8-week, online course, students will be paired with a non-profit organization in their local, regional, or global community to examine leader- ship issues within the organization and offer their assistance as a model of servant-leadership. Purposeful reflection exercises will explore connections between leadership theories and their experiential service activities. Students completing this course will understand leadership theory, identify the impact of service upon diverse stakeholders, and analyze the connection between service and leadership

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Wesleyan Studies


WS 357 Human Relations with a Global Perspective

Credits: 2

This course will help students understand human relations and develop cultural competency. Students will demonstrate the acquisition of knowledge about and skill in interpersonal and inter-group relations that contribute to the development of sensitivity to and understanding of the values, beliefs, life styles, and attitudes of individuals and the diverse groups found in a pluralistic society. Using a range of learning activities, this class will provide students with a variety of perspectives on global events and issues, allowing students to understand the impact of their actions or inaction as global citizens. Students will begin to translate knowledge of human relations into attitudes, skills, and techniques which will result in favorable learning experiences for students.

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Wesleyan Studies


Descriptions

ACCT 227 Financial Accounting I

Credits: 3

A study of the fundamentals of accounting with emphasis on the accumulation of accounting data and the preparation of financial reports for internal and external use. Successful completion of this course will enable the student to prepare and present the financial results of the firm’s operations.

Prerequisites: BA 100 Survey of Business, Sophomore standing.

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Business


ACCT 228 Financial Accounting II

Credits: 3

A continuation of ACTG 217 with emphasis on corporate accounting and an introduction to the analysis and interpretation of accounting data and its use in management of planning and control. Students completing this course successfully will be able to prepare and present internal financial reports to management.

Prerequisites: ACCT 227 Financial Accounting I, ACCT 227 with a grade of C- or higher.

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Business, Business Administration, Business Administration, Economics


ACTG 210 Introduction to Financial Accounting

Credits: 3

Introduction to reporting financial information regarding the operating, investing and financing activities of business enterprises to present and potential investors, creditors, and others.

Prerequisites: BA 100 Survey of Business, Sophomore standing; BA 100

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Business, Business Administration, Business Administration, Economics


ACTG 211 Managerial Accounting

Credits: 3

Managerial accounting is concerned with the development and use of accounting information as it applies to the decision-making process. Attention is given to cost behavior, cost analysis, and budget development. Successful completion of this course will enable students to prepare and explain detailed financial reports as required by management.

Prerequisites: ACCT 228 Financial Accounting II, ACTG 210 Introduction to Financial Accounting, BA 100 Survey of Business, Sophomore Standing; BA 100; ACTG 210 or ACCT 228.

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Business, Business Administration, Business Administration, Economics


ACTG 320 Intermediate Accounting I

Credits: 3

Study of the theory and practice of preparation of external financial reports for the corporate form of business. Income statement and statement of comprehensive income are explored with special emphasis on revenue recognition. Special topics include financial statement analysis, time value of money and the conceptual framework. Additional topics include classification, valuation and presentation of current assets, fixed assets and intangible assets. Students successfully completing this course will be able to develop and explain advanced financial reports for management and/or outside authorities. It is recommended that students plan to complete ACTG 320/ACTG 321 in a semester 1/ semester 2 immediate sequence to ensure all relevant concepts are covered.

Prerequisites: ACCT 228 Financial Accounting II, ACTG 210 Introduction to Financial Accounting, ACTG 211 Managerial Accounting, BA 100 Survey of Business, Junior standing; BA 100; ACTG 210 or ACCT 228; ACTG 211

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions


ACTG 321 Intermediate Accounting II

Credits: 3

Study of the theory and practice of preparation of external financial reports for the corporate form of business. Classification, valuation and presentation of investments, current liabilities, long-term liabilities, and shareholders’ equity will be explored. Special topics include derivatives, accounting changes and correction of errors, earnings per share calculations, preparation of statement of cash flows, and accounting for contingencies, bonds, leases, income taxes, pensions and other postretirement benefits. Students successfully completing this course will be able to develop and explain advanced financial reports for management and/or outside authorities. It is recommended that students complete the ACTG 320/ ACTG 321 in a semester 1/ Semester 2 immediate sequence to ensure all relevant concepts are covered. Junior standing; BA 100; ACTG 210 or ACCT 228; ACTG 211; ACTG 320.

Prerequisites: ACCT 228 Financial Accounting II, ACTG 210 Introduction to Financial Accounting, ACTG 211 Managerial Accounting, ACTG 320 Intermediate Accounting I , BA 100 Survey of Business, Junior standing; BA 100; ACTG 210 or ACCT 228; ACTG 211; ACTG 320.

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Business


ACTG 322 Cost Accounting

Credits: 3

A study of the generation and use of cost data for cost measurement, cost control and managerial purposes. This is an advanced managerial accounting course. Students successfully completing this course will be able to prepare and explain advanced financial reports to management.

Prerequisites: ACCT 228 Financial Accounting II, ACTG 210 Introduction to Financial Accounting, ACTG 211 Managerial Accounting, BA 100 Survey of Business, Junior standing; BA 100; ACTG 210 or ACCT 228; ACTG 211

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Business


ACTG 340 Introduction to Federal Tax

Credits: 3

Provides background in federal income tax law and the regulations of the Treasury Department. The course also deals primarily with basic philosophy of taxation, taxable income, allowable deductions and gains, losses of sales and exchanges of property for the individual taxpayer. This course serves also as an introduction to the federal taxation of partnerships and corporations. Discusses tax planning alternatives. Students successfully completing this course will be able to describe, identify, and report the types of income that are subject to federal tax.

Prerequisites: ACCT 228 Financial Accounting II, ACTG 210 Introduction to Financial Accounting, ACTG 211 Managerial Accounting, BA 100 Survey of Business, Junior stand- ing; BA 100; ACTG 210 or ACCT 228; ACTG 211

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Business


ACTG 342 Advanced Federal Tax

Credits: 3

This course examines in greater depth federal income tax law and regulations applicable to partnerships, corporations, and fiduciaries. Also covers federal gift and estate tax principles, reorganizations, personal holding companies, and the accumulated earnings tax. Emphasizes tax planning, including timing of transactions, appropriate form of transactions and election of methods when alternative methods are available under the law. Students successfully completing this course will be able to prepare required tax reports and explain the federal tax environment faced by the modern business.

Prerequisites: ACCT 228 Financial Accounting II, ACTG 210 Introduction to Financial Accounting, ACTG 211 Managerial Accounting, ACTG 340 Introduction to Federal Tax , BA 100 Survey of Business, Junior standing; BA 100; ACTG 210 or ACCT 228; ACTG 211; ACTG 340

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Business, Business Administration


ACTG 360 Accounting Information Systems

Credits: 3

Hands-on analysis of computer-based accounting information systems including flowcharting of business processes and study of internal controls. Students will develop their skills with MS EXCEL, MS Access, and selected accounting software through the completion of accounting-specific computer projects.

Prerequisites: ACCT 228 Financial Accounting II, ACTG 210 Introduction to Financial Accounting, ACTG 211 Managerial Accounting, ACTG 320 Intermediate Accounting I , ACTG 321 Intermediate Accounting II, BA 100 Survey of Business, BA 350 Business Information Systems, Junior standing; BA 100; BA 350; ACTG 210 or ACCT 228; ACTG 211; ACTG 320; ACTG 321

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Business, Business Administration


ACTG 380 Topics in Accounting

Credits: Variable

Selected topics in the area of accounting. Topics vary from year to year depending upon student demand and the judgment of the Division.

Prerequisites: Consent of instructor

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Business


ACTG 398 Experiential Learning Practicum

Credits: 3-6

A closely supervised employment experience which allows the student to explore career opportunities in the areas of accounting, business and economics. Allows the student to make a limited application of knowledge, skills and abilities imparted/ developed in the classroom. Students successfully completing this course will be able to explain and describe the similarity/contrast of accounting theory and practice.

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Business


ACTG 430 Advanced Accounting

Credits: 3

A study of accounting and procedures related to business combinations particularly as related to the preparation of consolidated financial statements. Students successfully completing this course will be able to describe and explain the financial complications that arise with business mergers and acquisitions.

Prerequisites: ACCT 228 Financial Accounting II, ACTG 210 Introduction to Financial Accounting, ACTG 211 Managerial Accounting, ACTG 320 Intermediate Accounting I , ACTG 321 Intermediate Accounting II, BA 100 Survey of Business, Senior standing; BA 100; ACTG 210 or ACCT 228; ACTG 211; ACTG 320; ACTG 321.

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Business


ACTG 431 Auditing, Principles and Procedures

Credits: 3

A study of the function of the independent CPA in regard to the examination of financial statements. Considerable attention is devoted to the purpose of the audit, the responsibilities of the CPA in rendering his opinion, liability of the auditor, planning of the audit, and limitations of the audit. Students successfully completing this course will be able to explain and describe an outside audit of a firm.

Prerequisites: ACCT 228 Financial Accounting II, ACTG 210 Introduction to Financial Accounting, ACTG 211 Managerial Accounting, ACTG 320 Intermediate Accounting I , ACTG 321 Intermediate Accounting II, BA 100 Survey of Business, Senior standing; BA 100; ACTG 210 or ACCT 228; ACTG 211; ACTG 320; ACTG 321

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Business


ACTG 440, 441, 442 Experiential Learning–Career Applications

Credits: 2-6

An Internship option designed to meet the needs of students who are employed full-time and who are seeking career enhancement experiences rather than career initiation skills.

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Business


ACTG 450 Government and Nonprofit Accounting

Credits: 3

Study of principles and procedures followed in accounting for the operation of governmental and nonprofit organizations. Successful students in this course will be able to explain and describe the accepted methods of accounting for government and nonprofit firms, as compared to for-profit firms.

Prerequisites: ACCT 228 Financial Accounting II, ACTG 210 Introduction to Financial Accounting, ACTG 211 Managerial Accounting, ACTG 320 Intermediate Accounting I , ACTG 321 Intermediate Accounting II, BA 100 Survey of Business, Senior standing; BA 100; ACTG 210 or ACCT 228; ACTG 211; ACTG 320; ACTG 321.

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Business


ACTG 490 Advanced Readings in Accounting

Credits: 1-3

An advanced reading course in which the student will read books from a bibliography provided by the instructor. For each credit hour the student must read five books. The student will be graded based on his or her analysis of each reading. Written and oral reports will be required. No more than a total of three credit hours will be allowed. Students successfully completing this course will have a wide breadth of knowledge in the chosen topic area.

Prerequisites: Senior standing; 3.35 GPA; and consent of advisor and division chairperson.

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Business


ACTG 498 Experiential Learning–Internship

Credits: 6-14

An employment/work experience which, as closely as possible, represents normal employment/work conditions. The student is enabled to apply knowledge, skills and abilities imparted/developed in the classroom setting to “real world” business situations.

Prerequisites: Junior standing and approval of program liaison.

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Business


ARC 101 English Language Skills I

Credits: 2

This course allows students who are not native English speakers to develop their reading, writing, speaking and listening skills. The course curriculum will include grammar, vocabulary, conversation strategies, pronunciation, listening, reading, writing, and free talk. Formal and informal activities will be used for best results.

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Office of Academic Success and Inclusive Support (O.A.S.I.S.)


ARC 102 English Language Skills II

Credits: 2

Students who are not native English speakers can continue to develop their reading, writing, speaking and listening skills in this course. The course curriculum will include grammar, vocabulary, conversation strategies, pronunciation, listening, reading, writing, and free talk. Formal and informal activities will be used for best results.

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Office of Academic Success and Inclusive Support (O.A.S.I.S.)


ARC 105 College Learning and Reading Efficiency

Credits: 2

College Learning and Reading Efficiency is a course designed to help students develop the reading and study skills necessary to do college level reading and learning. Emphasis will be placed on vocabulary, comprehension, critical thinking, various learning techniques, reading strategies, note taking, test taking skills and other strategies to improve performance in other courses.

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Office of Academic Success and Inclusive Support (O.A.S.I.S.)


ARC 200 Introduction to Peer Tutoring

Credits: 1

Introduction to Peer Tutoring develops basic tutoring skills, researching and writing a report on best practices in tutoring, and tutoring for the OASIS which can be used as service learning.

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Office of Academic Success and Inclusive Support (O.A.S.I.S.)


ARC 201 Advanced Peer Tutoring

Credits: 1

Advanced Peer Tutoring develops tutoring skills, assisting in the training and mentoring of new tutors, writing a reflective paper on tutoring practices and tutoring for the OASIS which can be used as Service Learning.

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Office of Academic Success and Inclusive Support (O.A.S.I.S.)


ART 109 Survey of Visual Communication

Credits: 3

Survey of Visual Communication is an introduction to the broad field of visual communication. The students will explore through sample projects four main areas: The Design Process; Business Concepts as they relate to the major; Technological aspects such as hardware, software and peripherals and The Media (print, electronic, broadcast). Students will learn problem solving skills and design principles using the tools and resources implemented by designers in the Visual Communication field.

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Humanities


ART 201 Basic Studio and Design 2-D`

Credits: 3

Foundations of Design introduces students to two and three-dimensional design utilizing an integrated approach of visual organization. Students will discuss using design vocabulary projects that they produced. Areas that will be emphasized are image composition, color theory, elements of organization and principles of 2-D physical structure. These projects will be accomplished using a broad variety of studio approaches: drawing, painting, photography, ceramics, craft medium, and architectural concepts.

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Humanities


ART 203 Art Appreciation

Credits: 3

A topical and historical approach to understanding fundamental aesthetic principles as apparent in great works of painting, drawing, sculpture and architecture. Recommended for non-majors who wish to broaden understanding of the field. Students will gain a vocabulary of design and art terms. Application of this knowledge will then be applied to visual elements of art and architecture as they related to world culture.

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Humanities


ART 204 Graphic Layout and Design

Credits: 3

Provides an introduction to the methods, materials, industry standard computer programs and techniques used in the development of various types of publications and advertising layout. Students will explore the fundamental elements of design, compose documents electronically, analyze design based on principles of perception, understand pre-press, and present completed projects while developing an understanding and critical awareness of contemporary practices.

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Humanities


ART 207 Photography I (WI)

Credits: 3

An introduction to basic digital photography, digital software and traditional black and white photography concepts. Specifically these areas are camera functions, image composition, lighting, and digital input, and presentation of images.

Prerequisites: ENG 105 College Composition and Research (WI) , ENG 201 Writing and Research about Literature (WI) , Lecture/demonstration/lab. Writing Intensive Course: Successful Completion of English 105 & 201 required.

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Humanities


ART 209 Multimedia Development

Credits: 3

An introduction to the methods, materials, computer programs and techniques used in the development of multimedia created for distribution by, various media and the internet. Students will learn to use graphic images, photography, typed word, and animation, video and sound to communicate with targeted audiences. Utilizing computer tutorials and design oriented assignments the students will develop an understanding and critical awareness of contemporary practices in this electronic medium.

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Humanities


ART 215 Painting I

Credits: 3

This introduction to the medium of painting serves both majors and non-majors with an exploration of composition, materials and techniques. Studies will include landscape, figure and still life painting. Application of design principles and color theory will be tested through a series of assignments that challenge students to translate theory into product. Works by major painters will be examined utilizing library research, investigation of contemporary artists and museum visits as part of the evaluation process. A final group critique and portfolio presentation is required.

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Humanities


ART 216 Ceramics I

Credits: 3

A beginning course in pottery and ceramic sculpture focusing on hand building processes. Students will be expected to grow in understanding of three dimensional design considerations and their individual technical skills. No previous experience is required.

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Humanities


ART 219 Drawing I

Credits: 3

This is a beginning class and provides an opportunity for students learn the basic skills of drawing. Students will use a variety of materials, incorporate elements of design, explore composition, work with the figure and proportion and develop a sense of personal aesthetic by looking at the work of other artists. The student will also be required to participate with others in informal and formal critiques. Evaluation will be based on daily work, longer projects and the final portfolio.

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Humanities


ART 225 Painting II

Credits: 3

Painting II focuses on the exploration and development of style and technique. Emphasis will be on individual development and competence in approach to medium, exploration of new materials and an expanded sense of aesthetic decision making. Students will be required to complete a variety of assignments that demonstrate successful application of skills acquired in the introductory class. Interaction with peers, art faculty, and participation in group critique and field trips will be part of the evaluation process. Each student must participate in the final critique and provide a final portfolio.

Prerequisites: ART 215 Painting I, ART 215 Painting I

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Humanities


ART 226 Ceramics II

Credits: 3

Ceramics II focuses on advanced technical production of ceramics including wheel thrown pots, combinations hand/wheel pieces, glaze making and specialized firing procedures. Application of skills acquired in Ceramics I will be expected. Each student will share in the responsibility of mixing and preparing the appropriate clay body, mixing glazes and participate in the kiln firings. Emphasis is placed on craftsmanship and personal creativity.

Prerequisites: ART 216 Ceramics I, ART 216 Ceramics I

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Humanities


ART 229 Drawing II

Credits: 3

This course is a follow-up opportunity for students to expand their knowledge and skill in drawing in particular the human figure and anatomy. Students will create a portfolio based on daily drawing and longer assignments that documents a use a variety of new materials, study of anatomy and a further development of a personal aesthetic by looking at the work of other artists. The student will also be required to participate with others in informal and formal critiques.

Prerequisites: ART 219 Drawing I, ART 219 Drawing I

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Humanities


ART 269 Interactive Media

Credits: 3

An introduction to the methods, materials, computer programs and techniques used in development of interactive media. Students will create electronic assignments that will allow the viewer to make choices in the projects’ content. The format may be a web site with many pages or interactive presentations containing branching menus inviting the viewer’s participation. Using computer software with design oriented assignments, the students will interview a client to define the product, identify the audience and type of communication that will meet project goals. This course will be available only to students who have a demonstrated ability to work on their own. Student will meet with art faculty for critiques and progress reports.

Prerequisites: Permission of art faculty

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Humanities


ART 304 Graphic Layout and Design II

Credits: 3

In this continuation of ART 204, students will work with advanced software applications, typography, and logo creation. Utilizing computer tutorials and design oriented assignments the students will develop an understanding and critical awareness of contemporary practices.

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Humanities


ART 310 Digital Illustration

Credits: 3

This is an advanced course that further explores and utilizes the concepts, computer skills and design experience developed from other courses: Photography, Drawing, Painting, Graphic Layout and Design. The student will work with digital input of hand drawings, paintings or other medium and translate them into digital illustrations using primarily Illustrator and Photoshop. The course will also introduce illustrators and their roles in Graphic Design.

Prerequisites: ART 204 Graphic Layout and Design, ART 207 Photography I (WI), ART 216 Ceramics I, Art 207, 204, 216

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Humanities


ART 335 Painting III

Credits: 3

Painting III provides an opportunity for students to expand and develop their painting skills and techniques while developing an individual sense of style. Although students are expected to attend during scheduled class hours at levels III and IV, work in Hershey Hall private studios is permitted. Participants are, however, to meet in critique with other painting students and participate in field trips.

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Humanities


ART 336 Ceramics III

Credits: 3

This course will provide advanced students with further opportunity for investigation into areas of ceramics including: artists, materials, and methods. Advanced hand building, wheel throwing techniques, larger scale and establishment of professional goals are possible goals for the course. Projects may be sculptural and focused on “one of a kind” pots. Students will establish individual project road maps while interacting with art faculty and fellow students during studio and critiques.

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Humanities


ART 339 Drawing III

Credits: 3

Drawing III provides student with a structured approach to advanced study. With input and consultation with the instructor, the student will design their own goals and objectives for the course. A final portfolio work is required. Students will select from areas of drawing exploration include new materials, methods, drawing construction and thematic development. Work in private studio is permissible during scheduled class hours. Students are, however, required to participate with faculty and students during critiques and field trips.

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Humanities


ART 345 Painting IV

Credits: 3

Painting IV provides additional growth in painting skills, techniques and personal style. This class will serve the serious studio major with opportunity to complete a body of work capable of completing a strong portfolio for exhibit submissions and graduate schools applications. Although students are expected to attend during scheduled class hours at levels III and IV, work in Hershey Hall private studios is permitted. Participants are, however, to meet in critique with other painting students and participate in field trips.

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Humanities


ART 346 Ceramics IV

Credits: 3

Ceramics IV provides advanced students with time for investigating areas of ceramics including: materials, advanced hand building, wheel throwing techniques, larger scale. Glaze calculation and kiln operation/construction are other areas of exploration. Students will establish individual project roadmaps while interacting with art faculty and fellow students during studio and critiques. Establishment of professional goals, portfolio preparation for exhibitions and graduate applications will be a valuable end product of this course. Students will establish individual project roadmaps while interacting with art faculty and fellow students during studio and critiques.

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Humanities


ART 349 Drawing IV

Credits: 3

Drawing IV provides students with a structured approach to advanced study. The student with the instructor and choose one area or theme. A final portfolio is required. Areas of drawing exploration include new materials, methods, drawing construction and thematic development. Work in private studio is permissible during scheduled class hours. Students are, however, required to participate with faculty and students during critiques and field trips.

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Humanities


ART 359 Printmaking

Credits: 3

An introductory course designed to acquaint the student with various processes in the printmaking field. Students will learn the basic principles of monotype, relief and intaglio printmaking: historical context, tools, safety, and processes. A background in drawing and 2-D design is recommended.

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Humanities


ART 368 Advanced Studio Studies

Credits: 3

An opportunity for the advanced student to explore a studio or art history topic beyond the regularly scheduled courses available to students in the Art Program. This course will be available only to students who have a demonstrated ability to work on their own, meeting with art faculty for critiques and progress reports.

Prerequisites: Permission of art instructor.

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Humanities


ART 379 Advanced Visual Communication and Design

Credits: 3

Advanced students will improve their professional skills and portfolio in one of six specific areas of Visual Communication: 1) Print Media, 2) Interactive Media, 3) Multimedia, 4) Internet Design, 5) Animation, or 6) Digital Photography. The students and the instructor will determine areas requiring more concentration. The students will develop professional projects to strengthen their portfolios, thus enhancing their portfolios, thus enhancing their employment opportunities in the Visual Communication field.

Prerequisites: ART 204 Graphic Layout and Design, ART 209 Multimedia Development, ART 304 Graphic Layout and Design II, ART 204 Graphic Layout and Design, ART 304 Graphic Layout and Design II, and ART 209 Multimedia Development.

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Humanities


ART 380 Topics in Art

Credits: 3

An opportunity for advanced students to request a class in a topical area not offered on regular basis through the program. A class might be established in such areas as photography, sculpture, crafts or art history.

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Humanities


ART 381 History of Art I (WI)

Credits: 3

A study of major artistic achievements in the western world from prehistoric times to the late Middle Ages. Students will become familiar with the emergence of visual imagery and the development of style. Students will learn to recognize cultural differences and be able to identify distinct characteristics of each, while acknowledging their interconnectedness and contributions to other societies. Students will develop an appreciation of visual imagery and its impact on culture and the advancement of society.

Prerequisites: ENG 105 College Composition and Research (WI) , ENG 201 Writing and Research about Literature (WI) , Writing Intensive Course: Successful Completion of English 105 and 201 required.

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Humanities


ART 382 History of Art II (WI)

Credits: 3

This course opens with an investigation of major artistic achievements of the Renaissance and continues to the mid 1800s. A continuation of ART 381, but all art history need not be taken in sequence. The age of discovery, shifting of political models, the fortification of the church and eventual move of artists from established academic styles to individual expression will be discussed. Students will gain an understanding of the immense power artists of this time held and how their images helped shape opinion during this time period.

Prerequisites: ENG 105 College Composition and Research (WI) , ENG 201 Writing and Research about Literature (WI) , Writing Intensive Course: Successful Completion of English 105 and 201 required.

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Humanities


ART 383 History of Art III (WI)

Credits: 3

A study of contemporary issues in art from 1850 to the present. Stylistic evolution, historical context and the effect of popular culture on the visual arts will be our focus for the semester.

Prerequisites: ENG 105 College Composition and Research (WI) , ENG 201 Writing and Research about Literature (WI) , Writing Intensive Course: Successful Completion of English 105 and 201 required.

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Humanities


ART 398 Practicum in Graphic Design

Credits: 3

An opportunity to work in a professionally supervised setting in fields such as publications, design and display. Practica are arranged with guidelines available from the art faculty.

Prerequisites: Proposals must be approved before registration.

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Humanities


ART 440, 441, 442 Career Applications

Credits: 2-6

Internship projects that do not fit a six credit hour internship.

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Humanities


ART 497 Independent Studies

Credits: 1-3

A course for advanced students who wish to work on special problems in art. Periodic conferences and reports on progress will be required.

Prerequisites: Advanced standing, a written project proposal, consent of instructor.

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Humanities


ART 498 Internship

Credits: 6-14

The internship allows for a substantive Internship in art. The internship will be tailored to the student’s particular interest and developed skill. The number of hours involved with a particular internship will determine the number of credit hours to be earned. Planning and project research must take place with the instructor during the junior year. The internship normally takes place during the senior year. Specific qualifications, guidelines and project placement information may be obtained from the program advisor. All plans and decisions will be made in consultation with both the student’s academic advisor and the Director of Internship.

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Humanities


ART 499A Senior Seminar

Credits: 1

Senior Seminar (A) will focus on the preparation of credential materials and the portfolio and electronic portfolio. A written philosophy of art, a cover letter and photographing art work will also be included. Individuals are expected to check in with art faculty for evaluation and progress report.

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Humanities


ART 499B Senior Seminar

Credits: 1

Senior Seminar (B) will center around the Senior Art Exhibition. Activities will include all aspects of the show: selection of work, designing invitations, compiling a mailing list, matting and framing, designing the exhibition space to accommodate both two and three dimensional work, installation and lighting. Students will be evaluated by the quality and professionalism of the work, as well as effectiveness when working as a team. Senior Seminar (A) and (B) are considered the capstone course and final assessment piece for the art major.

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Humanities


BA 100 Survey of Business

Credits: 3

A survey of the structure and functions of the American business system is provided, together with an overview of business organization, accounting, finance, principles of management, economics, marketing, personnel and the interdependence of business, the community and government. Upon successful completion of the course, the student will be able to describe and explain the basic internal functional areas of a business, and their relationship to outside stakeholders.

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Business, Business Administration, Business Administration


BA 101A Microsoft Outlook Certification

Credits: 1

Students who successfully complete the Microsoft certification examinations demonstrate that they can meet globally recognized performance standards. Students receive a certificate from Microsoft Corporation which is then transferred onto their Iowa Wesleyan University transcript.

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Business


BA 101B Microsoft Word Certification

Credits: 1

Students who successfully complete the Microsoft certification examinations demonstrate that they can meet globally recognized performance standards. Students receive a certificate from Microsoft Corporation which is then transferred onto their Iowa Wesleyan University transcript.

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Business


BA 101C Microsoft Excel Certification

Credits: 1

Students who successfully complete the Microsoft certification examinations demonstrate that they can meet globally recognized performance standards. Students receive a certificate from Microsoft Corporation which is then transferred onto their Iowa Wesleyan University transcript.

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Business


BA 101D Microsoft PowerPoint Certification

Credits: 1

Students who successfully complete the Microsoft certification examinations demonstrate that they can meet globally recognized performance standards. Students receive a certificate from Microsoft Corporation which is then transferred onto their Iowa Wesleyan University transcript.

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Business


BA 101E Microsoft Access certification

Credits: 1

Students who successfully complete the Microsoft certification examinations demonstrate that they can meet globally recognized performance standards. Students receive a certificate from Microsoft Corporation which is then transferred onto their Iowa Wesleyan University transcript.

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Business


BA 102A Resume/Cover Letter Writing

Credits: 0

This seminar reviews the development and effective use of a resume, cover letter, and on-line job application processes.

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Business


BA 102B Job Search Success

Credits: 0

This seminar informs students on best and worst ways to search for internships and full-time positions in the workforce, steps to take during the job search process and how to build and maintain a professional and online network.

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Business


BA 102C Interviewing Strategies

Credits: 1

This seminar helps students understand the ways to prepare for job interviews, tactics and strategies to employ during an interview, and the proper way to follow up with potential employers after a job interview.

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Business


BA 102D Dress for Success

Credits: 0

This seminar reviews the proper dress for various types of interviews, work-related functions, and social situations common in today’s workplace.

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Business


BA 102E Dining Etiquette

Credits: 0

This seminar helps students understand proper dining etiquette in business and social situations, including seating, introductions, toasts, utensils, plate, and glassware us- age.

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Business


BA 102F Life after College

Credits: 0

This seminar is designed to help students understand and prepare for their financial responsibilities after college, learn about company culture and practice professional manners.

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Business


BA 103 Microsoft Office Skills I

Credits: 3

This course is one of two courses designed to prepare students to successfully complete certification for components of the Microsoft Office software suite. This course gives students the practical instruction required to allow them to pass the certification examinations.

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Business


BA 104 Microsoft Office Skills II

Credits: 3

This course is one of two courses designed to prepare students to successfully complete certification for components of the Microsoft Office software suite. This course gives students the practical instruction required to allow them to pass the certification examinations.

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Business


BA 242 Introduction to Value Investing

Credits: 3

Introduction to investment strategies and philosophy developed by Benjamin Graham and Warren Buffett. Development of analysis tools to select and monitor the single firm’s performance will be emphasized. The use of a stock market simulation game will be a requirement of the course. Upon successful completion of this course a student will be able to describe the investing strategy of Benjamin Graham and Warren Buffett; explain the career opportunities for those who work with investments; describe and perform accepted value-investing techniques in stock selection and explain and describe how stocks are bought and sold in an on-line environment.

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Business


BA 310 Principles of Management

Credits: 3

This course is a study of the basic principles, concepts, theories and analytical tools in management. Topics include introduction to management, planning and decision- making, organizing for stability and change, leading and controlling. Consideration will be given to both theoretical and practical aspects of management. Students completing this course successfully will be able to describe both the theoretical back- ground and practical applications of popular business management principles and strategies.

Prerequisites: BA 100 Survey of Business, ECN 102 Macroeconomics , Junior standing; BA 100; ECN 102.

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Business


BA 311 Small Business Management

Credits: 3

Focus is on effective management of small business firms. The management process includes not only strategy determination, but also the varied activities necessary in planning, organizing, actuating and controlling small business operations. Emphasis is placed upon those aspects of small business management that are uniquely important to small firms.

Prerequisites: BA 100 Survey of Business, BA 310 Principles of Management , ECN 102 Macroeconomics , Junior standing; BA 100; BA 310; ECN 102.

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Business


BA 312 Analysis of Organizational Behavior

Credits: 3

Enables the student to apply the concepts learned in various business administration, accounting and economics courses to real-life cases and in-depth studies of business organizations and their participants.

Prerequisites: BA 100 Survey of Business, BA 310 Principles of Management , ECN 102 Macroeconomics , Junior standing; BA 100; BA 310; ECN 102.

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Business


BA 320 Principles of Marketing

Credits: 3

A study of the problems involved in making marketing decisions for the consumer and organizational markets. Study includes the price of the product, the promotion of the product, and the channels of distribution for the product. Successful completion of the course will enable the student to make sound product, price, distribution, and promotion decisions for a specific product or service offering.

Prerequisites: BA 100 Survey of Business, ECN 101 Microeconomics , BA 100; ECN 101.

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Business


BA 321 Consumer Behavior

Credits: 3

Consideration of the behavioral aspects of marketing; discussion of the factors which influence consumers in the buying process. The influence of the factors of family, social class, life cycle and life-style in the product selection and buying process. Upon successful course completion, students will be able to describe the differences between niche markets that determine their different buying behaviors and preferences.

Prerequisites: BA 100 Survey of Business, BA 320 Principles of Marketing , ECN 101 Microeconomics , Junior standing; BA 100; BA 320; ECN 101.

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Business


BA 322 Principles of Advertising

Credits: 3

A discussion of the importance of advertising in the development of a comprehensive marketing strategy. Considers the factors of motivation, communication of the advertising message, development of the advertising message, and selection of appropriate media. Students successfully completing the course will be able to describe the foundations of advertising theory and their application to a modern advertising strategy.

Prerequisites: BA 100 Survey of Business, BA 320 Principles of Marketing , ECN 101 Microeconomics , Junior standing; BA 100; BA 320; ECN 101.

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Business


BA 323 Marketing Research

Credits: 3

An introduction to the methodology and analysis of marketing research. Explores the uses of marketing research in management decision making. Students will design, conduct, analyze and present the results of a marketing research project. Topics include research design, data acquisition and analysis, creation of research reports and research ethics.

Prerequisites: BA 100 Survey of Business, BA 320 Principles of Marketing , ECN 101 Microeconomics , ECN 240 Applied Statistics for Economics and Business , MATH 171 Elementary Statistics , Junior standing; BA 100; BA 320; ECN 101; MATH 171; ECN 240.

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Business


BA 324 Marketing Management

Credits: 3

Advanced study of marketing planning, strategy, and decision-making utilizing marketing principles covered in BA 320, Principles of Marketing. Emphasis is placed on analysis of real-life cases.

Prerequisites: BA 100 Survey of Business, BA 320 Principles of Marketing , ECN 101 Microeconomics , Junior standing; BA 100; BA 320; ECN 101.

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Business


BA 330 Business Law

Credits: 3

A study of traditional business law topics - contracts, sales, torts, agency, business organizations and other basic topics. Successful completion of this course will enable students to understand and use business law principles to guide sound business decisions.

Prerequisites: BA 100 Survey of Business, Junior standing; BA 100 or consent of instructor.

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Business


BA 332 Administrative and Personnel Law

Credits: 3

This course studies the effects of administrative and personnel laws on the decision- making responsibilities of employers, employees and Human Resource Practitioners. It explores the impact of personnel policies and practices of organizations and addresses the development, intent and implications of protective legislation from the federal to the local level. Upon completing the course the student will be able to demonstrate understanding in legal and regulatory factors in personnel law; laws affecting employers, employees and contractors; identifying elements in a total compensation system/pay rules; job analysis, description and evaluation; union and management legal requirements; rules governing employee benefit and leave programs; and basic procedures to manage a compensation system.

Prerequisites: BA 100 Survey of Business, BA 330 Business Law , Junior standing; BA 100; BA 330.

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Business


BA 340 Corporate Financial Management

Credits: 3

Introduces the student to the goals and objectives of financial management within the corporate setting. Students will become familiar with functions of the various financial areas, the development and use of information by the financial manager, and the various analytical tools and techniques used. Successful completion of this course will enable students to make sound, risk-sensitive financial decisions for their business. Emphasis will be placed upon financial decision making.

Prerequisites: ACTG 210 Introduction to Financial Accounting, BA 100 Survey of Business, MATH 171 Elementary Statistics , BA 100; ACTG 210; MATH 171.

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Business


BA 341 Investments

Credits: 3

This course introduces the student to investment philosophy and investment alternatives. The viewpoint is that of the individual investor. Students will become familiar with various investment vehicles, sources of information contained in the financial press, as well as methods of interpreting the behavior of the financial markets. Successful completion of the course will enable students to make balanced, risk-measured asset selections for their portfolios.

Prerequisites: ACCT 228 Financial Accounting II, ACTG 210 Introduction to Financial Accounting, ACTG 211 Managerial Accounting, BA 100 Survey of Business, BA 340 Corporate Financial Management, ECN 240 Applied Statistics for Economics and Business , MATH 171 Elementary Statistics , Junior Standing; BA 100; BA 340; ECN 240; ACTG 210 or ACCT 228; ACTG 211; MATH 171.

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Business


BA 343 Advanced Value Investing

Credits: 3

An extension of BA 242, Introduction to Value Investing. Advanced analysis of investment portfolio risk management. The stock selection process pioneered and developed by Benjamin Graham and Warren Buffett will be extended to include the analysis of comprehensive portfolios. Competing theories will be introduced for comparative purposes. The extensive use of a stock market simulation game will be a requirement of the course. Upon successful completion of this course a student will be able to apply value investing strategy in portfolio construction; explain how risk is determined and managed in a collection/ portfolio of stocks; describe and perform modern value investing portfolio control (buy-sell) techniques and explain and describe how stocks are bought and sold in an on-line environment.

Prerequisites: ACCT 228 Financial Accounting II, ACTG 210 Introduction to Financial Accounting, BA 242 Introduction to Value Investing, ACTG 210 or ACCT 228, BADM 340; junior standing; BA 242 (introduction to value investing); or permission of the instructor.

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Business


BA 350 Business Information Systems

Credits: 3

A study of the uses of the digital computer in the functional areas of business administration. Major emphasis will be directed to analysis, design and implementation of Management Information Systems. Students successfully completing this course will be able to critically analyze the efficiency and effectiveness of business information systems.

Prerequisites: ACCT 228 Financial Accounting II, ACTG 210 Introduction to Financial Accounting, ACTG 211 Managerial Accounting, BA 100 Survey of Business, Junior standing; BA 100; ACTG 210 or ACCT 228; ACTG 211.

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Business


BA 360 Human Resource Management

Credits: 3

Principles and practices in recruitment, selection, staffing and compensation of personnel. Consideration of the impact of government regulations, and other environmental forces on human resource management in the workplace. Students who successfully complete the course will be able to describe and apply a variety of practical, theory-based solutions to common human resource management problems and challenges.

Prerequisites: BA 100 Survey of Business, BA 310 Principles of Management , ECN 102 Macroeconomics , Junior standing; BA 100; ECN 102; BA 310.

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Business


BA 361 Psychology of Business and Industry

Credits: 3

Psychology as applied to problems of personnel selection and evaluation, prevention of accidents, promotion of work efficiency, morale, advertising, and human factors engineering. At the conclusion of the course, successful students can demonstrate the ability to analyze (from a philosophical and practical viewpoint) how people and the workplace interact; how to maximize the positive relationship between employee and employer; techniques of job and employee assessment; and performance enhancements such as morale, health/safety, motivation technique and group behavior.

Prerequisites: BA 100 Survey of Business, BA 310 Principles of Management , Junior standing; BA 100; BA 310.

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Business


BA 362 Compensation and Benefits

Credits: 3

Examines various rewards systems (including financial) in organizations and studies relevant theoretical and legal perspectives. At the conclusion of the course, the successful student will be able to: identify and describe the federal legislation impact on compensation and benefit plans; explain how an organization’s total compensation system promotes external competitiveness and internal effectiveness; articulate methods of analyzing jobs, evaluating the internal worth of jobs and redesigning positions; determine a cost-effective base pay and incentive pay structure; identify key features of a variety of benefit plans; and analyze strategic issues in designing pay structures, administering benefit plans, containing health-care costs and communicating the system to employees.

Prerequisites: BA 100 Survey of Business, BA 310 Principles of Management , BA 360 Human Resource Management, ECN 102 Macroeconomics , Junior standing; BA 100; BA 310; BA 360; ECN 102.

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Business


BA 370 Operations Management

Credits: 3

Operations management is the study of activities required for the efficient and effective selection of inputs to produce economical and profitable outputs for both manufacturing and service firms. Quantitative solutions derived with the use of a variety of analytical tools will be used. Upon completion of the course, the student will understand production and service systems inputs, processes, and outputs. The student will also gain a further understanding of quantitative solution development in the functional areas of management, marketing, accounting, finance, and human resources management.

Prerequisites: BA 100 Survey of Business, BA 310 Principles of Management , ECN 102 Macroeconomics , ECN 240 Applied Statistics for Economics and Business , MATH 171 Elementary Statistics , Junior standing; BA 100; BA 310; MATH 171; ECN 102; ECN 240

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Business


BA 380 Topics in Business Administration

Credits: Variable

Topics may vary from year to year and will be selected with regard to student demand and judgment of the division.

Prerequisites: Consent of instructor.

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Business


BA 398 Experiential Learning–Practicum

Credits: 3-6

A closely supervised employment experience which allows the student to explore career opportunities in the areas of accounting, business and economics. Allows the student to make practical application of knowledge, skills and abilities imparted/ developed in the classroom. Students successfully completing a practicum will have a clear understanding of the connection between business training and the needs of the business.

Prerequisites: Junior standing and approval of program liaison.

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Business


BA 419 Business Strategy

Credits: 3

This course focuses on the competitive strategy of the firm by examining issues central to the firm’s long- and short-term competitive position. The course develops a set of analytical frameworks that enable students to explain performance differences among firms and that, in turn, provide a structure for making strategic decisions to enhance the firm’s future competitive positions. This course functions as the capstone course for the Accounting and Business Administration majors.

Prerequisites: ACCT 228 Financial Accounting II, ACTG 210 Introduction to Financial Accounting, ACTG 211 Managerial Accounting, BA 100 Survey of Business, BA 310 Principles of Management , BA 320 Principles of Marketing , BA 330 Business Law , BA 340 Corporate Financial Management, BA 350 Business Information Systems, BA 370 Operations Management , ECN 101 Microeconomics , ECN 102 Macroeconomics , ECN 240 Applied Statistics for Economics and Business , MATH 171 Elementary Statistics , PHIL 215 Ethics for Life and Career , Senior Standing; MATH 171; PHIL 215; COMM 255; ECN 101; ECN 102; ECN 240; ACTG 210 or ACCT 228; ACTG 211; BA 100; BA 310; BA 320; BA 330; BA 340; BA 350; BA 370.

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Business


BA 440, 441, 442 Experiential Learning–Career Applications

Credits: 2-6

A Internship option designed to meet the needs of students who are employed full-time and who are seeking career enhancement experiences rather than career initiation skills.

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Business


BA 490 Advanced Readings in Business Administration

Credits: 1-3

An advanced reading course in which the student will read books from a bibliography provided by the instructor. For each credit hour the student must read five books. Grades are based on the student’s analysis of each reading. Written and oral reports will be required. No more than a total of three credit hours will be allowed.

Prerequisites: Senior standing; 3.35 GPA; and consent of advisor and division chairperson.

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Business


BA 497 Independent Study in Business Administration

Credits: 1-3

For seniors with consent of the division chair.

Prerequisites: Senior Standing

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Business


BA 498 Experiential Learning-Internship

Credits: 6-15

An employment/work experience which as closely as possible, represents normal em- ployment/work conditions. The student is afforded the opportunity to apply knowl- edge, skills and abilities imparted/developed in the classroom setting to “real world” business situations.

Prerequisites: Junior standing and approval of program liaison.

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Business


BIO 201 General Botany – Fall

Credits: 4

A course designed to give a basic knowledge of the anatomy and physiology of seed plants for students wishing to continue studies in biology and to give non-biology majors a general appreciation of plants. The relationships between structures and functions of the leaf, stem, root, flower, fruit, and seed are studied. Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to describe the basic principles of botany, the structure and functions of different parts of plants, and to identify certain genera and species.

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Science


BIO 211 General Zoology – Fall

Credits: 4

A survey course, including laboratory, designed to acquaint the student in the fundamental principles of animal life, with emphasis on the structure and function of selected cells, tissues, organs, systems, and organisms. Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to describe basic principles of zoology, the structure and functions of cells and organelles, and the concepts of animal life.

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Science


BIO 241 Human Anatomy and Physiology I – Fall

Credits: 4

This lecture/laboratory course introduces the student to the basic cell processes. It will also cover the anatomy and physiology of the tissues, integumentary, skeletal, muscular, and nervous system. Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to describe the fundamental principles of anatomy and physiology at the chemical, cellular, tissue, organ, system and organismal levels.

Prerequisites: 4 hrs of chemistry

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Nursing, Division of Science, Division of Education, Majors, Exercise Science and Wellness, Health, Physical Education


BIO 242 Human Anatomy and Physiology II – Spring

Credits: 4

This lecture/laboratory course introduces the student to the endocrine, cardiovascular, lymphatic, respiratory, digestive, urinary, and reproductive systems of the human body. Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to demonstrate the anatomical and physiological interrelationships of these systems, and explain the components, structure and functions of the human body.

Prerequisites: BIO 241 Human Anatomy and Physiology I – Fall , BIO 241

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Science


BIO 260 Ecology and Conservation

Credits: 4

A lecture, laboratory, and field study of ecological principles as they apply to plant and animal interrelationships in their environment. Natural systems analysis and natural resource conservation are studied. Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to demonstrate a knowledge of the basic concepts and applications of conservation.

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Science


BIO 300 Ecosystem Studies

Credits: 1-2

Intensive studies of natural areas and their inhabitants with emphasis on the development and functioning of specific ecosystems. Taxonomic, anatomical and physiological information will be presented through lectures, laboratory work and Internships. The specific ecosystems will be selected with regard to student demand and faculty availability. Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to analyze and characterize specific ecosystems. May be repeated for different systems.

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Science


BIO 302 Plant Morphology

Credits: 4

A lecture and laboratory course designed to acquaint the student with morphological and ecological relationships of representative members of the plant kingdom. Morphogenesis and evolutionary trends are emphasized. Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to describe in depth the morphology and evolution of plants.

Prerequisites: BIO 201 General Botany – Fall , BIO 201

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Science


BIO 312 Animal Development and Diversity

Credits: 4

A lecture and laboratory course designed to acquaint the student with the anatomical and ecological diversity of the animal kingdom. Comparative life cycles of representative members of the major animal groups are studied. Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to describe various life cycles, anatomy, and evolution of animals.

Prerequisites: BIO 211 General Zoology – Fall, BIO 211

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Science


BIO 324 Taxonomy of Flora and Fauna

Credits: 4

A lecture, laboratory, and field study of the classification, nomenclature, identification, and documentation of plants and animals. Specific flora and fauna will vary. Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to identify and classify plants and animal using taxonomic keys.

Prerequisites: BIO 201 or 211 or 260 or consent of instructor

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Science


BIO 350 Microbiology – Spring

Credits: 4

An introductory course dealing primarily with the biology of bacteria, although other microorganisms are also studied. The importance of beneficial as well as disease- causing microorganisms is presented. Laboratory techniques for culturing and nutritional differentiation are studied and performed. Students will be able to isolate, culture, and identify various microorganisms.

Prerequisites: 8 hours of biology, 4 hours of chemistry

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Science


BIO 355 Genetics – Fall

Credits: 4

An introductory course dealing with the principles of plant and animal inheritance. A basic study of the molecular structure and function of genetic material (DNA and RNA); basic cytology; and developmental, behavioral, and human genetics. Sex determination, linkage, chromosomal recombination, and recent discoveries and techniques in biotechnology are studied. Upon completion of this course, students will be able to demonstrate their understanding of the basic concepts of inheritance, the structure of DNA, and their ability to perform techniques such as PCR and electrophoresis.

Prerequisites: MATH 171 Elementary Statistics , 8 hrs. of biology, 8 hrs. of chemistry, MATH 171

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Science


BIO 360 Cell and Molecular Biology

Credits: 4

This course presents a systematic approach to concepts of cell and molecular biology with an emphasis on the biological and chemical processes that occur in the cell and how these are related to cell function. Students will understand these underlying principles and analyze the current scientific research that has led to the current view of the cell.

Prerequisites: BIO 211 General Zoology – Fall, CHEM 175 Principles of Chemistry I – Fall , CHEM 176 Principles of Chemistry II – Spring , BIO 211, CHEM 175 and CHEM 176

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Science


BIO 380 Topics in Biology

Credits: 1-4

This will be an intensive study of a selected topic and may include laboratory and/ or field work. The specific topics will be selected with regard for student needs and interests of the faculty. Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to collect information on a specific topic in biology, compose a document to demonstrate scientific writings skills, and demonstrate the knowledge related to the topic studied. May be repeated for different topics. No more than six hours will be counted toward the major unless otherwise recommended by the Division chairperson.

Prerequisites: 8 hours of biology or consent of the instructor. Not offered on a regular basis

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Science


BIO 386 Biochemistry

Credits: 4

An introductory lecture course. Topics include nomenclature, typical reactions, qualitative and quantitative analysis, and intermediary metabolism. Particular emphasis will be given to factors effecting enzyme kinetics and metabolic control. Students successfully completing this course will become familiar the general structure of prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells, will acquire knowledge of the various classes of bio-organic compounds and their roles in cellular metabolism, and will learn the general metabolic pathways found in cells and multicellular organisms.

Prerequisites: BIO 201 General Botany – Fall , BIO 211 General Zoology – Fall, CHEM 355 Organic Chemistry I (with lab) – Fall, BIO 201 or 211; CHEM 355 or consent of the instructor. Offered even numbered Springs

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Science


BIO 398 Practicum in Biology

Credits: 2

This practicum allows for practical work experience on campus in biology. Specific guidelines, which include prerequisites, and application procedures, may be obtained from the Division chairperson. Each student’s individual Practicum must be approved by the Division before the student begins the practicum or registers. Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to demonstrate preparation for entry and success in biology.

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Science


BIO 440, 441, 442 Career Applications

Credits: 2-6

The Career Applications allows for practical work experience or research training for those students whose class schedule, course load or program design does not permit them to complete the Internship in one term. Specific guidelines, which include prerequisites and application procedures, may be obtained from the Division chairperson. Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to demonstrate preparation for entry and success in science related graduate and professional schools, industry, or laboratory and field programs, or teaching.

Prerequisites: Senior standing in the major

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Science


BIO 497 Independent Study in Biology

Credits: 1-3

Original investigation of special problems. Open to juniors and seniors whose general ability and training in biology make probable their success with a research problem. Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to perform scientific investigations and interpret scientific data. (See also Independent Study in the index.)

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Science


BIO 498 Internship in Biology

Credits: 6-12

This internship allows for practical work experience in biology. Specific guidelines, which include prerequisites and application procedures, may be obtained from the Division chairperson. Each student’s individual internship must be approved by the Division before the student registers for or begins the internship. Upon successful completion, students will be able to describe their work experience in connection to their biology coursework, and express in writing what they learned in their field placement.

Prerequisites: Senior standing in the major

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Science


BIO 498 Internship in Biology

Credits: 6-12

This internship allows for practical work experience in biology. Specific guidelines, which include prerequisites and application procedures, may be obtained from the Division chairperson. Each student’s individual internship must be approved by the Division before the student registers for or begins the internship. Upon successful completion, students will be able to describe their work experience in connection to their biology coursework, and express in writing what they learned in their field placement.

Prerequisites: Senior standing in the major

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Science


BIO 499A Biology Seminar I

Credits: 1

This course will involve student research on an approved Biology topic. Techniques of biological research, scientific writing, editing of scientific writing, and formal presentation of results will be discussed and analyzed. Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to compose a professional document designed to disseminate a scientific report using proper format and style

Prerequisites: Primarily for juniors and seniors in the major but open to others with consent of the instructor

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Science


BIO 499B Biology Seminar II

Credits: 1

This course will involve a formal oral presentation of Biology research and techniques of critiquing oral and written scientific works. Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to present the information from Biology Seminar I in a professional and persuasive manner in both thesis form and as a journal article. Must be taken consecutively with Biology Seminar I.

Prerequisites: Primarily for juniors and seniors in the major but open to others with consent of the instructor

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Science


CHEM 105 General Chemistry I – Spring

Credits: 4

This course is an introduction into the general topics of inorganic chemistry. Topics include atomic structure, chemical bonds, mole relationships, states of matter, acids and bases, reaction rates, equilibria, electrochemistry, and nuclear chemistry.

Prerequisites: High school algebra

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Science


CHEM 175 Principles of Chemistry I – Fall

Credits: 4

A mathematically based introductory course in chemistry. Topics include atomic and molecular structure, chemical relationships, quantitative relationships, and gas theories. Laboratory will emphasize concepts covered in lecture. Upon successful completion, students will be able to solve qualitative and quantitative problems involving stoichiometric relationships, will have an understanding of kinetic molecular theory and how it applies to the behavior of gases, and will possess the basic conceptual vocabulary necessary to understand chemical information.

Prerequisites: Concurrent enrollment Math 162 or higher, or consent of instructor

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Science


CHEM 176 Principles of Chemistry II – Spring

Credits: 4

This course is a continuation of CHEM 175. Topics include kinetics, equilibria, acid-base concepts, electrochemistry and nuclear chemistry. Students successfully completing this course will have an understanding of current and historical acid-base theory and how it is applied experimentally, an understanding of the basic concepts governing the rates of chemical reactions, and an understanding of both qualitative and quantitative approaches to chemical equilibria.

Prerequisites: CHEM 175

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Science


CHEM 271 Quantitative Analysis – Fall

Credits: 4

Primarily a laboratory course stressing precision and technique. Wet chemical methods of analysis will be used to illustrate precipitation reactions, complexation, acid/base and redox chemistry. The class work will stress solution equilibria. Students successfully completing this course will become proficient in the laboratory techniques used for wet chemical analysis and the underlying concepts behind them.

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Science


CHEM 300 Environmental Chemistry

Credits: 4

See EVHL 300

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Science


CHEM 355 Organic Chemistry I (with lab) – Fall

Credits: 4

This introductory survey course is centered around structure and is organized by functional groups. Nomenclature, properties, preparations, and reactions of the various groups will be studied. Students successfully completing this course will gain a knowledge of the standard approaches to organic chemical nomenclature, will become familiar with basic methods for determining and writing organic reaction mechanisms, including an understanding of electron-pushing, and will begin learning some of the reactions and reagents useful for organic chemical transformations and synthesis. Laboratory techniques and basic reactions of organic compounds will be stressed. Students successfully completing this course will become proficient in typical methods of organic chemical isolation and purification, including liquid-liquid extraction, distillation, and recrystallization.

Prerequisites: CHEM 176

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Science


CHEM 356 Organic Chemistry II (with lab) – Spring

Credits: 4

An extension and expansion of CHEM 355. The central themes will be reaction mechanism and structure. Infrared, ultraviolet, and NMR spectroscopy will be explored as tools in structural determination. Students successfully completing this course will broaden their knowledge of organic chemical transformations, and will become proficient in interpreting organic spectra. Lab inclusion of instrumental methods of studying molecules and reactions. Reaction mechanisms will play an important role. A major multi-step synthesis is a culminating activity. Students successfully completing this course will become familiar with performing multi-step synthetic reactions on the micro and macroscale, and will gain hands on knowledge of NMR, IR, and UV spectroscopy.

Prerequisites: CHEM 355

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Science


CHEM 380 Topics in Chemistry

Credits: 1-4

The course will be an intensive study of a selected topic and may include laboratory work. The specific topics will be selected with regard for student need and interests of the faculty. May be repeated for different topics. No more than six hours will be counted toward the major unless recommended by the Division chairperson.

Prerequisites: 8 hours of college chemistry and permission of the instructor

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Science


CHEM 497 Independent Study in Chemistry

Credits: 1-3

This course will give students of demonstrated ability an opportunity to make an independent study of some selected topic under close supervision. Prerequisites: 16 hours of chemistry and consent of the chemistry faculty.

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Science


CJ 231 Introduction to Criminal Justice

Credits: 3

A survey of the major components of the criminal justice system including the police, courts, and corrections. Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to describe the American criminal justice structure and functions, distinguish between consensus and conflict models of the criminal justice system and explain the meaning of due process and equal protection under the law.

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Science


CJ 260 Criminal Law and Individual Rights

Credits: 3

This course covers substantive criminal law and criminal procedure. Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to articulate the origins of criminal law; identify the elements of various types of crime and defenses to criminal acts; and discuss constitutional protections related to search and seizure, due process, double- jeopardy, rights against self-incrimination, rights to an attorney, rights to a jury trial and court decisions on cruel and unusual punishments

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Science


CJ 307 Criminology

Credits: 3

A scientific study of crime and criminal behavior based on classical, neoclassical, positivistic, social process, and structural theories of crime causation. Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to discuss the development of sociological criminology, critically analyze theoretical explanations for crime and articulate research findings on crime.

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Science


CJ 308 Juvenile Delinquency

Credits: 3

This course covers the special problems and laws pertaining to juvenile offenders. Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to distinguish between status offenses and criminal acts, articulate the problem of juvenile crime and justice, and discuss the legal framework for handling and rehabilitating juvenile delinquents.

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Science


CJ 316 Introduction to Corrections

Credits: 3

An overview of the history and contemporary development of the field of corrections. Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to articulate philosophies of punishment, discuss correctional law and inmate rights, and evaluate correctional programs to rehabilitate correctional clients.

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Science


CJ 322 Probation and Parole

Credits: 3

A study of contemporary practices related to probation and parole with emphasis on community corrections as an alternative to incarceration. Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to explain the difference between probation and parole, discuss the legal framework for probation and parole supervision, and describe the job of probation and parole officers.

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Science


CJ 330 Criminal Courts

Credits: 3

This course will examine the philosophical and constitutional assumptions underlying the American criminal court system of justice. Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to articulate issues and controversies related to the law and crime, explain how the criminal court process works; and discuss the impact that criminal cases have on society as a whole.

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Science


CJ 347 Research Methods

Credits: 3

See SSCI 347 under Psychology course listings

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Science


CJ 355 Law Enforcement

Credits: 3

A comprehensive study of federal, state, and local law enforcement agencies. Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to articulate methods, problems, issues, and challenges of police work; explain the rule of law as it applies to probable cause for arrest, Miranda rights, search and seizure, and the questioning of criminal suspects; and discuss the civil liabilities for civil rights violations and police misconduct.

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Science


CJ 370 Multiculturalism in Criminal Justice

Credits: 3

This course covers the impact of cultural factors on the field of criminal justice with emphasis on the interaction between criminal justice practitioners and members of minority communities. Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to critically analyze the effect of race and ethnicity on crime, articulate gender and ethnic issues in criminal justice agencies, and discuss majority and minority views on the fairness of the criminal justice system

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Science


CJ 380 Topics in Criminal Justice

Credits: 3

Selected topics in the area of criminal justice. This course will give students the op- portunity to study in-depth a particular topic beyond what is covered in existing courses. Course offerings will depend upon student and faculty interest and faculty availability.

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Science


CJ 385 Terrorism and Homeland Security

Credits: 3

A study of how the United States government has responded to the threat of terrorism on American soil since the September 11th attacks. The role of federal, state, and local law enforcement agencies in defending the homeland are discussed. Upon completion of this course, students will be able to identify foreign terrorist groups and goals, discuss the various laws and antiterrorism programs that have been adopted to protect the United States from future attacks, and critically examine the rule of law in prosecuting foreign terrorists.

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Science


CJ 398 Practicum in Criminal Justice

Credits: 3

This practicum permits practical work experience on campus in criminal justice. Specific guidelines, which include perquisites and application procedures, may be obtained from the Science chair.

Prerequisites: Unanimous approval by the Science Division before the student begins the practicum or registers.

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Science


CJ 416 Crime and Punishment

Credits: 3

An advanced study of classical and modern theories of penology with emphasis on contemporary issues related to crime and punishment. Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to discuss and critically analyze the development of penology as a field of study, articulate philosophical views of punishment, and apply criminal and correctional law to individual rights and public order.

Prerequisites: CJ 307, CJ 316 or consent of instructor

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Science


CJ 425 Criminal Justice Administration

Credits: 3

An analysis of the management and supervision practices of top administrators, mid-level managers, and first-line supervisors in criminal justice agencies. Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to describe and discuss the organizational structure, policies, procedures, rules and regulations, and everyday work practices of criminal justice agencies.

Prerequisites: CJ 231 or consent of the instructor

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Science


CJ 440, 441, 442 Career Applications in Criminal Justice

Credits: 2-6

This course permits practical work experience in criminal justice for students who are unable to complete six hours of internship in a single semester due to class schedule or course load. The number of hours needed to complete credit hours in Career Applications will be the same as those required to complete Internship credit hours. The difference is that Career Applications will spread the work over more weeks.

Prerequisites: Junior of senior standing and unanimous approval of the Science Division

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Science


CJ 497 Independent Study in Criminal Justice

Credits: 3

An in-depth study into a specific area of criminal justice. Periodic conferences with the instructor and written documentation of the area of study are required.

Prerequisites: Consent of the instructor

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Science


CJ 498 Internship in Criminal Justice

Credits: 6-12

The internship allows for practical work experience in criminal justice. This course is required for criminal justice majors. Upon successful completion of the internship, students will be able to describe their work experience, connect their work experience to their criminal justice coursework, and articulate orally and in writing what they learned in their field placement.

Prerequisites: Junior or senior standing

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Science


CJ 499 Seminar in Behavioral Science

Credits: 3

Seminar in Behavioral Science

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Science


COMM 147 Introduction to Public Speaking

Credits: 3

This course focuses on the development of effective presentational skills through the performance of various speeches and interpretative performances of literature. Students successfully completing this course will understand and be able to apply public speaking knowledge, including audience analysis, exigency analysis, critical and interpretive analysis of content, organization of content in appropriate presentational formats, presentational skills, and the linguistic requirements of effective public speaking

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Humanities, Endorsements, K-8 English/Language Arts


COMM 380 Special Topics in Communication

Credits: 3

This course will give students the opportunity to study in-depth a particular topic beyond what is covered in existing Communication courses. Topics vary year by year, and this course may be repeated for different topics. No more than six hours will be counted toward the major unless approved in advance by the Division chairperson.

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Humanities


COMM 497 Independent Study in Communication

Credits: 1-3

This course is designed for advanced students who wish to research and write a paper on a specific topic or do a special project in communication.

Prerequisites: Advanced standing, a written project proposal, and permission of division chair.

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Humanities


CS 201 Computer Programming I – Fall

Credits: 4

An introduction to the fundamental ideas, techniques, and concepts of computer science and programming. Topics will include algorithms development, variables, sequence, selection, repetition, arrays, and functions. Students satisfactorily completing this course will be able to write and debug code in a programming language.

Prerequisites: Math 162 College Algebra and Trigonometry

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Science


CS 380 Topics in Computer Science

Credits: 3

An intensive study of a topic. The topic selected will depend on student needs and interests, staff interests, and the judgment of the Computer Science faculty. Possible topics include: assembly language programming, modeling and simulation, computer graphics, microprocessor instrumentation and control, and computer assisted instruction. No more than six hours will be counted toward the major unless recommended by the Division chairperson.

Prerequisites: CS 201, 202, 233 or consent of instructor

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Science


CS 497 Independent Study in Computer Science

Credits: 3

This course will give students of demonstrated ability an opportunity to make an independent study of some topic under close supervision. See also Independent Study in the Index.

Prerequisites: 12 hours of computer science

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Science


ECN 101 Microeconomics

Credits: 3

Topics in this course include the behavior of individual households and firms, supply and demand analysis, and the various structures of a market economy. Students successfully completing this course will be able to identify and explain the major economic forces faced by a single firm in a capitalistic setting.

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Economics


ECN 102 Macroeconomics

Credits: 3

This course is designed for the general student as well as for the student considering further study in business administration, accounting or economics. This course develops basic economic theory to explain unemployment, inflation and economic growth and considers the role of governmental economic stabilization policy. Students successfully completing this course will be able to identify and explain the major economic forces faced by groups of firms in a capitalistic setting.

Prerequisites: ECN 101

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Economics


ECN 240 Applied Statistics for Economics and Business

Credits: 3

Statistical methods commonly used in the analysis of empirical data are considered, including descriptive and inferential statistics, and parametric and nonparametric techniques. Computer applications and the relationship between statistics and research design are emphasized in relation to business & economics problems. Students successfully completing this course will be able to perform the statistical analysis portion of a college research project.

Prerequisites: Sophomore standing; BA 100; MATH 171

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Economics


ECN 321 Economics of Labor Relations

Credits: 3

The labor market and its relation to the overall economy; the development, structure, goals and policies of labor organizations; major issues in labor-management relations; problems of public policy, wage theories and wage determination. Successful completion of this course will enable students to identify and describe the major issues in labor and their relationship to overall economic conditions.

Prerequisites: Junior standing; BA 100; ECN 101; ECN 102

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Economics


ECN 322 Money and Banking

Credits: 3

Essentials of commercial and central banking, monetary policy and theory: A study of how the central banking system controls the money supply; conducts monetary policy through the different tools they have available. The course will include several of the theoretical approaches that have been developed since the beginning of modern capitalism and the need for modern money emerged. Successful completion of this course will enable students to describe the major monetary strategies of government and business.

Prerequisites: Junior standing; BA 100; ECN 101; ECN 102

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Economics


ECN 330 History of Economic Thought

Credits: 3

This course will follow the development of Economics from Adam Smith through John Maynard Keynes. The development will be traced through the study of the authors who contributed to the profession’s development. Students successfully completing this course will be able to compare and contrast the major theories of economics since 1776.

Prerequisites: Junior standing; BA 100; ECN 101; ECN 102

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Economics


ECN 341 Research Methods for Economics and Business

Credits: 3

The course includes discussion and study of various research methods, research design and treatment of data for use in economic, financial and marketing studies that are intended to apply or test various theoretical positions in these business disciplines. Participation in a research project is required. Students successfully completing this course will be able to design and conduct a college-level research project.

Prerequisites: Junior standing; BA 100; MATH 171

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Economics


ECN 350 Economics of International Business

Credits: 3

An introduction to international economic problems and public policy responses. The course includes discussions of tariffs, quotas, exchange rate control, the balance of payments, international capital and labor movements, and policies designed to encourage international economic stability and cooperation. Students successfully completing this course will be able to define and explain the major economic forces of the modern global business environment.

Prerequisites: Junior standing; BA 100; ECN 101; ECN 102

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Economics


ECN 351 International Economic Development

Credits: 3

An introduction to theories and approaches to development of the non-industrialized countries. With a policy and strategy orientation, the course will examine the contemporary issues of development from the perspective of increasing globalization and international interdependence. Students successfully completing this course will be able to identify and describe the major forces shaping the development of less- developed countries

Prerequisites: Senior standing; BA 100; ECN 101; ECN 102; ECN 350

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Economics


ECN 380 Topics in Economics

Credits: 3

Selected topics in the economics area.

Prerequisites: ECN 101; ECN 102 and consent of instructor

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Economics


ECN 398 Experiential Learning–Practicum

Credits: 3-6

A closely supervised employment experience which allows the student to explore career opportunities in the areas of accounting, business and economics. Allows the student to make a limited application of knowledge, skills and abilities imparted/ developed in the classroom. Students successfully completing practicum will be able to compare and contrast economic theory with practical applications.

Prerequisites: Junior standing and approval of program liaison

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Economics


ECN 440, 441, 442 Experiential Learning–Career Applications

Credits: 2-6

An Internship option designed to meet the needs of students who are employed full-time and who are seeking career enhancement experiences rather than career initiation skills. Students desiring to register in this course must obtain the approval of the faculty of the Division of Business.

Prerequisites: Junior standing and approval of divisional liaison

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Economics


ECN 498 Experiential Learning–Internship

Credits: 6-15

An employment/work experience, which as closely as possible, represents normal employment/work conditions. The student is afforded the opportunity to apply knowledge, skills and abilities imparted/developed in the classroom setting to “real world” business situations. Students successfully completing an internship will be able to compare and contrast economic theory and practical applications.

Prerequisites: Senior standing and approval of program liaison

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Economics


EDUC 110 Introduction to Teacher Education

Credits: 1

This course will help students understand various requirements of the Teacher Education Program (TEP) and the State of Iowa for teacher certification. Students will become familiar with the mission and conceptual framework of the TEP as it fits within the Iowa Wesleyan University philosophy. Student will also demonstrate the acquisition of knowledge about and skill in use of the InTASC Standards/Working Portfolio and electronic formats for instruction (Edmodo) and assessment (LiveText). . Freshmen education students should take this course in their second semester on campus and transfer students should take this course during their first semester on campus.

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Education, Majors, Early Childhood Education, Educational Foundations, Elementary Education, Physical Education, Endorsements, Athletic Coaching, Reading, Early Childhood Education, Health, Instructional Strategist I: Mild & Moderate, K-8 English/Language Arts, K-8 Science, K-8 Social Studies, Music, Physical Education


EDUC 215 Technological Applications in the Classroom K–12

Credits: 2

Students plan and implement strategies for integrating technology into the school curriculum. Students develop lesson plans and sample projects which simulate elementary/secondary students’ use of technology to solve problems or present results, helping to prepare them for the adult work world.

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Education, Majors, Educational Foundations, Elementary Education, Physical Education, Endorsements, Music, Physical Education


EDUC 261 Early Experience in the Schools

Credits: 1

A required 30 hours of supervised experiences within the PK-12 classroom prior to provisional admission to the teacher education program. Placement is done through the Education Division. Students explore teaching as a career. Students assist the classroom teacher with individual and small groups of students, and analyze how their observations address selected standards of the teacher education department goals.

Prerequisites: Should be taken in freshman or sophomore year. Must have successful background check on file.

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Education, Majors, Early Childhood Education, Elementary Education, Physical Education, Endorsements, K-8 English/Language Arts, K-8 Science, K-8 Social Studies, Music, Physical Education


EDUC 262 Participation and Analysis in the Schools

Credits: 1

An organized participation in the schools requiring 30 hours of supervised experiences within the PK-12 classroom. Placement is done through the Education Division. Students design and teach at least three short lessons, assist the classroom teacher with individual and small groups of students, and analyze how their observations address selected standards of the teacher education department goals. Must have successful background check on file.

Prerequisites: EDUC 261; 2.5 GPA; and passed 2 modules of a basic skills test. Intended to be taken in conjunction with a methods course.

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Education, Majors, Early Childhood Education, Elementary Education, Endorsements, K-8 English/Language Arts, K-8 Science, K-8 Social Studies, Music, Physical Education


EDUC 263 Participation and Analysis in the Schools

Credits: 1

EDUC 263 is the third of three sequenced early field experiences for the teacher education program. The expectation is that each teacher candidate receives a wide variety of placements as they move from 261, 262, and 263 to finishing with the student teaching course. Students can request the opportunity to work with specific teachers or in specific districts, but the Field Experience Committee will be responsible for all initial contacts with the school administrators to arrange for placement. This phase of the Participation and Analysis will emphasize the management of the classroom as a whole and focus on learning environment issues. The teacher candidate will prepare and present, and then gather cooperating teacher feedback on three whole group lessons; will examine school-wide and classroom management; and will present findings to 261 and 262 students.

Prerequisites: EDUC 262; 2.75 GPA; and passed all modules of a basic skills test. Must have successful background check on file.

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Education, Majors, Early Childhood Education, Elementary Education, Endorsements, K-8 English/Language Arts, K-8 Science, K-8 Social Studies, Music, Physical Education


EDUC 268 Care and Development of the Preschool Child

Credits: 3

Students learn about the study of prenatal and postnatal development to age 8. Students gain knowledge about children’s physical and social needs and their place in the family.

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Education, Majors, Early Childhood Education


EDUC 279 Introduction to Early Childhood Education

Credits: 3

Students examine the field of early Childhood education, emphasizing the philosophy, history, current trends and principles of guidance of the young child.

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Education, Majors, Early Childhood Education


EDUC 294 Foundations of Education

Credits: 2

Students examine the history of education and the influence that politics, economics, social class, gender, ethnicity, religion, and race have on American public education(K-12). Students analyze the role that these and other socio-cultural issues have on education at the federal, state, and local levels.

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Education, Majors, Early Childhood Education, Elementary Education, Endorsements, K-8 English/Language Arts, K-8 Science, K-8 Social Studies, Music, Physical Education


EDUC 295 Curriculum Development and Evaluation

Credits: 3

Students will gain information about the development of elementary and secondary curriculum; definitions, learning theories, implementation and assessment strategies, and classroom management. Students will apply the information learned in the development of a curriculum project.

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Education, Majors, Elementary Education, Endorsements, K-8 English/Language Arts, K-8 Science, K-8 Social Studies, Music, Physical Education


EDUC 296 Educational Psychology

Credits: 3

Students examine the principles and theories of psychology as they relate to human learning and assessment in education. Students acquire background information about multiple theories of human development; different approaches to cognition and educational research; and various teaching strategies and assessment for traditional and exceptional, handicapped, and gifted and talented students. Students design and score a variety of test formats including multiple choice, essay and portfolio assessment. Students comprehend the processes of instructional design, motivation, classroom management, discipline, measurement and evaluation and understand strategies to meet the unique needs of the “at risk” and special needs student.

Prerequisites: A general psychology course is recommended.

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Education, Majors, Early Childhood Education, Educational Foundations, Elementary Education, Exercise Science and Wellness, Physical Education, Endorsements, Athletic Coaching, Reading, K-8 English/Language Arts


EDUC 301 Education of Exceptional Persons

Credits: 3

A basic study of exceptionality in children and youth, including the emotionally disturbed, disadvantaged, mentally retarded, gifted, physically handicapped and those with learning disabilities including characteristics, methods of identification, curriculum development, research and current educational structures and practices. Students will observe special education students in a variety of appropriate settings and will learn to make modifications and accommodations appropriate to their area of certification.

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Education, Majors, Early Childhood Education, Educational Foundations, Elementary Education, Exercise Science and Wellness, Physical Education, Endorsements, Athletic Coaching, Reading, Early Childhood Education, Health, Instructional Strategist I: Mild & Moderate, K-8 English/Language Arts, K-8 Science, K-8 Social Studies, Music, Physical Education


EDUC 302 Classroom Management

Credits: 2

This course addresses the learning of classroom management techniques that focus upon a well-organized, structured yet flexible, warm and caring environment in which children and youth will grow both intellectually and socially. In this course, students study various theoretically-based management models, learn how to analyze behavior problems, and create a final project that is a synthesis of the information learned as it relates to their areas of certification. An overarching goal of this course is for students to determine their own theory and practices of behavior management to be used once working professionally. By the end of this term students should have a good collection of ideas, strategies, and interventions for building positive learning environments and proactively addressing problematic behaviors in the classroom and other school settings.

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Education, Majors, Early Childhood Education, Educational Foundations, Elementary Education, Exercise Science and Wellness, Physical Education, Endorsements, Athletic Coaching, Reading, Early Childhood Education, Health, Instructional Strategist I: Mild & Moderate, K-8 English/Language Arts, K-8 Science, K-8 Social Studies, Music, Physical Education


EDUC 305 Elementary School Science Methods

Credits: 3

The purpose of this required course is to provide students with foundations in science education using meaningful and practical learning experiences in order to prepare them to create an effective science learning environment for elementary students. The three areas of strength for science programs, 1) science content, 2) science process skills, and 3) positive attitude toward science, will be addressed experientially in this course. Students will be immersed in learner-centered methods to help students understand appropriate instructional strategies for elementary school science experiences.

Prerequisites: EDUC 110, 294, 295, & 296

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Education, Majors, Elementary Education


EDUC 323 Elementary School Math Methods

Credits: 3

During this required course students will engage in five overreaching arenas of study: mathematics, problem solving, classroom climate, assessment, and professional development. These arenas will be integrated through activities and projects, readings and discussions, and lesson planning. The course is designed to assist students in gaining experience with mathematics, and experience research based methods that may be carried further into their practice.

Prerequisites: Math 150, EDUC 110, 294, 295, & 296.

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Education, Majors, Elementary Education


EDUC 324 Primary Literacy Methods

Credits: 3

The purpose of this course is for students to discern and discuss theories relating to language development from birth through the primary years of school and the teacher’s role in that development. Students will examine methodology, language processes, and learning strategies in the areas of phonemic awareness, phonics, vocabulary, fluency, comprehension, spelling, and writing. Students will demonstrate an understanding of the components to a comprehensive literacy program. This is the first course in the sequence of courses needed for the reading endorsement.

Prerequisites: to: EDUC 110, 342, EDUC 294, 295, & 296

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Education, Majors, Early Childhood Education, Elementary Education, Endorsements, Reading


EDUC 327 Reading in the Secondary Content Areas Methods

Credits: 2

Integration of reading strategies into secondary content areas and application of current research, effective methodology, strategies and materials for teaching middle and high school reading. Assessment tools and procedures explored. Field experience requirement.

Prerequisites: EDUC 110, 294, 295, & 296

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Education, Majors, Endorsements, Reading, Early Childhood Education, Health, Instructional Strategist I: Mild & Moderate, K-8 English/Language Arts, K-8 Science, K-8 Social Studies, Music, Physical Education


EDUC 331 Elementary School Social Studies Methods

Credits: 2

Presents methods and materials for teaching the content of the social studies in the elementary school.

Prerequisites: EDUC 110 Introduction to Teacher Education, EDUC 294 Foundations of Education, EDUC 295 Curriculum Development and Evaluation, EDUC 296 Educational Psychology, EDUC 110, 294, 295, & 296

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Education, Majors, Elementary Education


EDUC 332 Elementary School P.E. and Health Methods & Curriculu

Credits: 3

Students examine the philosophy, objectives, principles, assessment, curriculum, and activities related to the teaching of health and physical education in the elementary schools. This course is designed for the physical education major.

Prerequisites: EDUC 110 Introduction to Teacher Education, EDUC 294 Foundations of Education, EDUC 296 Educational Psychology, PE 290 Curriculum Instruction & Design PE K-12, EDUC 110, 294, 296, & PE 290

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Education, Physical Education, Endorsements, Health, Physical Education


EDUC 338 Children’s Literature

Credits: 2

Students explore the various genres of children’s literature appropriate for children from kindergarten to grade 6. Students increase their understanding of how language develops through use of literature. Students examine literary elements and analyze the quality of a book. Students learn to embed good literature into content areas of learning in addition to practicing teaching methods to story comprehension and appreciation. Students experience storytelling, story reading and poetry recitation.

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Education, Majors, Early Childhood Education, Elementary Education, Endorsements, Reading


EDUC 342 Intermediate Literacy Methods

Credits: 3

Students will learn methodology relating to language processes and strategies for intermediate students’ acquisition and fluent expression of language. Students will gain knowledge in the intellectual, social, emotional, and physical developmental needs that impact intermediate age students’ literacy skills. Students not only increase their knowledge about the language skills learned in the primary grades, but improve their understanding on vocabulary development, comprehension, and critical thinking skills. Students will be able to conduct authentic assessment and implement reading in the content areas.

Prerequisites: EDUC 110 Introduction to Teacher Education, EDUC 294 Foundations of Education, EDUC 295 Curriculum Development and Evaluation, EDUC 296 Educational Psychology, EDUC 324 Primary Literacy Methods, EDUC 110, 294, 295, & 296 & 324

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Education, Majors, Elementary Education, Endorsements, Reading


EDUC 348 Readings in Literature for Adolescents

Credits: 3

Provides opportunity for extensive reading in literature for adolescents and introduces students to individualized reading programs as they are conducted in public schools. Students will read and annotate more than 30 books, noting literary qualities and developmental tasks and gauging appropriate grade-level.

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Education, Majors


EDUC 355 Methods and Materials for Early Childhood Education

Credits: 3

Students will learn methods and principles of development and operation of programs for young children, including involvement with parents. Students gain experience in activities for the care and development of the young child including education for the physical, mental and social development of the preschool child.

Prerequisites: EDUC 110 Introduction to Teacher Education, EDUC 268 Care and Development of the Preschool Child, EDUC 279 Introduction to Early Childhood Education, EDUC 294 Foundations of Education, EDUC 296 Educational Psychology, EDUC 110, 268, 279, 294, and 296

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Education, Majors, Early Childhood Education


EDUC 357 Human Relations: Global Perspective for Educators

Credits: 2-3

Students will understand the values, life styles, history, and contributions of various identifiable subgroups in our society. Students will recognize dehumanizing biases such as sexism, racism, prejudice, and discrimination, in instructional materials and in daily interactions of members of society. They will become aware of the impact that such biases have on interpersonal relations and learning. Students will translate knowledge of human relations into attitudes, skills, and techniques which will result in favorable learning experiences for students. Students will learn to respect human diversity and the rights of each individual. This course satisfies the Global Awareness course for Wesleyan Studies.

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Education, Majors, Early Childhood Education, Educational Foundations, Elementary Education, Exercise Science and Wellness, Physical Education, Endorsements, Athletic Coaching, Reading, Early Childhood Education, Health, Instructional Strategist I: Mild & Moderate, K-8 English/Language Arts, K-8 Science, K-8 Social Studies, Music, Physical Education


EDUC 382 Modern English Grammars

Credits: 3

Explores structure of modern English. Students will analyze English sentences, determine the constituents of a well-made sentence, and identify the form and function of words and phrases. Students will also apply grammatical concepts to classroom situations.

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Education, Majors, Endorsements, K-8 English/Language Arts


EDUC 390 Elementary Specials Methods: Art, Music, and Physical Education/Health/Wellnes

Credits: 3

The purpose of this course is to instruct general education students in areas of art, music, and physical education/health/wellness to integrate into their subject areas. It will also be of value in preparing future teachers for a job opportunity in a district without specials in one or all of these areas. Learning Outcomes: Students will become familiar with philosophy, national standards, objectives, principles, and activities relating to the teaching of art, music, and physical education/health/wellness activities to enrich social studies, science, math, and language arts content.

Prerequisites: EDUC 110 Introduction to Teacher Education, EDUC 294 Foundations of Education, EDUC 295 Curriculum Development and Evaluation, EDUC 296 Educational Psychology, EDUC 110, 294, 295 & 296

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Education, Majors, Early Childhood Education, Elementary Education


EDUC 396 H, I, K and L Secondary School Methods

Credits: 3 each

A special methods course designed for each of the areas of secondary education. The student will examine methods of organization, presentation of materials, evaluation techniques and classroom management.

Prerequisites: EDUC 110 Introduction to Teacher Education, EDUC 294 Foundations of Education, EDUC 296 Educational Psychology

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Education, Majors, Endorsements, Health, K-8 English/Language Arts, K-8 Science, K-8 Social Studies, Music, Physical Education


EDUC 396H Secondary School Special Methods, Major: Health & Curriculum

Credits: 3

Students will learn techniques to use in teaching health in the secondary school. They will write lesson plans and teach in the secondary setting and be evaluated by the instructor.

Prerequisites: EDUC 110 Introduction to Teacher Education, EDUC 294 Foundations of Education, EDUC 296 Educational Psychology, PE 290 Curriculum Instruction & Design PE K-12, EDUC 110, 294, 296 & PE 290

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Education, Majors, Endorsements, Health, Physical Education


EDUC 396I Secondary School Special Methods, Major: Industrial Technology

Credits: 3

Students will learn techniques to use in teaching industrial technology in the secondary school. They will write lesson plans and teach in the secondary setting and be evaluated by the instructor.

Prerequisites: EDUC 110, 294, 295, & 296

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Education, Majors, Endorsements


EDUC 396K Secondary Special Methods, Major: Physical Education & Curriculum

Credits: 3

Students will learn techniques to use in teaching secondary physical education. Students will also write lesson plans and teach them to secondary students and be evaluated by classmates and the instructor.

Prerequisites: EDUC 110 Introduction to Teacher Education, EDUC 294 Foundations of Education, EDUC 296 Educational Psychology, PE 290 Curriculum Instruction & Design PE K-12, EDUC 110, 294, 296 & PE 290

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Education, Majors, Physical Education, Endorsements, Health, Physical Education


EDUC 396L Secondary Special Methods, Major: Mathematics

Credits: 3

Students will learn techniques to use in teaching math in the secondary school. They will write lesson plans and teach in the secondary setting and be evaluated by the instructor.

Prerequisites: EDUC 110 Introduction to Teacher Education, EDUC 294 Foundations of Education, EDUC 295 Curriculum Development and Evaluation, EDUC 296 Educational Psychology, EDUC 110, 294, 294 & 296

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Education, Majors, Endorsements


EDUC 402-404 Senior Seminar for Student Teachers

Credits: 1

An integral part of the student teaching experience, this required course provides students the opportunity to review classroom organization and management, job seeking strategies and an ongoing series of exercises encouraging reflection on the student teaching experience.

Prerequisites: Full Admission into Teacher Education and Approval for Student Teaching.

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Education, Majors, Early Childhood Education, Elementary Education, Endorsements, Health, K-8 English/Language Arts, K-8 Science, K-8 Social Studies, Music, Physical Education


EDUC 421 Practicum in Early Childhood Education (Preschool)

Credits: 3 or 6

Students learn how to plan and implement instruction using a variety of strategies that meet the needs of individual students. They gain understanding of how prior learning and cultural background impacts children’s learning. Students also understand the importance of creating a warm, caring, structured learning environment emphasizing quality communication with students, parents, colleagues and various community sources. Students also understand the importance of professional development.

Prerequisites: All coursework listed on the Early Childhood Education Checklist and Full Admission to Teacher Education Program.

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Education, Majors, Early Childhood Education


EDUC 422 Practicum in Early Childhood Education (Kindergarten)

Credits: 3 or 6

Students learn how to plan and implement instruction using a variety of strategies that meet the needs of individual students. They understand how prior learning and cultural background impacts learning. Students gain an appreciation about the importance of creating a warm, caring, and structured learning environment as well as effective methods to communication with students, parents, colleagues and various community sources. Students will also understand the importance of professional development.

Prerequisites: All coursework listed on the Early Childhood Education Checklist and Full Admission to Teacher Education Program.

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Education, Majors, Early Childhood Education


EDUC 442-443 Practicum in Elementary Education

Credits: 6-14

A full-time program of experience in one or more elementary schools at two grade levels. Students learn how to plan and implement instruction using a variety of strategies that meet the needs of individual students. They understand how students learn and how prior learning and cultural background impacts learning. Students gain knowledge about the importance of creating a warm, caring, structured learning environment through effective communication with students, parents, colleagues and various community sources. Students gain experience through professional development opportunities.

Prerequisites: All coursework listed on the Elementary Education Checklist and Full Admission to Teacher Education Program.

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Education, Majors, Elementary Education


EDUC 451 Diagnostic and Assessment Reading Methods

Credits: 3

Students will gain information about standardized, formal assessment methods in the area of reading; general principles of assessment and diagnosis, including basic statistics. Students will consider how disabilities impact acquisition of reading skills and reading instruction and learn techniques for using reading assessment to guide classroom instruction.

Prerequisites: EDUC 324 Primary Literacy Methods, EDUC 324

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Education, Endorsements, Reading


EDUC 452 Remedial Reading Methods

Credits: 3

Students will gain information about the informal assessment of students with reading difficulties and explore effective reading strategies and methods in major areas of reading including phonemic awareness, phonics, word identification, vocabulary, comprehension, writing, spelling, fluency, the attitudes of readers and writers and meeting individual student needs.

Prerequisites: EDUC 324 Primary Literacy Methods, EDUC 324

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Education, Majors, Endorsements, Reading


EDUC 453-454 Remedial Reading Practicum at K-8 or 5-12 level

Credits: 3

A field experience in a Title 1 classroom with a certified Title 1 teacher. Students completing this experience will be able to successfully implement all components to a remedial reading classroom including assessment, diagnosis, prescription, and remediation.

Prerequisites: All coursework listed on the Reading Endorsement Checklist and Full Admission to Teacher Education Program.

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Education, Endorsements, Reading


EDUC 455 Multi-tiered Systems of Support

Credits: 3

This course examines the three-tiered system of prevention and intervention currently mandated for public school districts. Upon completion of this course, students will have a thorough understanding of the historical and research-based foundation for a multi-tiered system approach, as well as how to implement the three levels in their schools with appropriate levels of intensity. Specific areas of concentration include curriculum and instruction, assessment and progress monitoring, and social- behavioral support while ensuring fidelity of implementation school- or district-wide.

Prerequisites: Junior or Senior standing or approval of Instructor

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Education, Majors


EDUC 482-483 Practicum K-12 Education

Credits: 6-14

An individually planned program of experience in one elementary school and one secondary school for K-12 Art, Music, and Physical Education Majors. (See EDUC 442-443 or 492-493) Students will learn how to plan and implement instruction using a variety of strategies that meet the needs of individual students. They will gain knowledge and experience about how students learn and how prior learning and cultural backgrounds impact learning. Students will gain knowledge and experience about the importance of creating a warm, caring, and structured learning environment through effective communication with students, parents, colleagues and various community sources. Students gain experience through professional development opportunities.

Prerequisites: All coursework listed on the K-12 Checklist and Full Admission to Teacher Education Program.

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Education, Majors, Early Childhood Education, Educational Foundations, Elementary Education, Exercise Science and Wellness, Physical Education, Endorsements, Athletic Coaching, Reading, Early Childhood Education, Health, Instructional Strategist I: Mild & Moderate, K-8 English/Language Arts, K-8 Science, K-8 Social Studies, Music, Physical Education


EDUC 498 Internship

Credits: 6-14

The field experience allows for a substantive field experience in an area of interest to the student. The field experience will be tailored to the student’s particular interest and skill. The field experience is required of students who are pursuing an undergraduate degree in education without licensure. Planning and project research must take place with the instructor of the field experience. The field experience normally takes place during the senior year. Specific qualifications, guidelines, and project placement information may be obtained from the program advisor. All plans and decisions will be made in consultation with both the student’s academic advisor and the Director of Field Experience.

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Education, Majors, Educational Foundations


EDUC 555 Multi-tiered Systems of Support

Credits: 3

This course examines the three-tiered system of prevention and intervention currently mandated for public school districts. Upon completion of this course, students will have a thorough understanding of the historical and research-based foundation for a multi-tiered system approach, as well as how to implement the three levels in their schools with appropriate levels of intensity. Specific areas of concentration include curriculum and instruction, assessment and progress monitoring, and social- behavioral support while ensuring fidelity of implementation school- or district-wide.

Prerequisites: Completion of Bachelor’s degree

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Education


ENG 100 Fundamentals of English

Credits: 4

Instruction in composition to prepare students for ENG 105. Students completing the course will write clear sentences and paragraphs, and they will demonstrate basic competence in thesis and idea development, organization, style, and proofreading skills.

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Humanities


ENG 105 College Composition and Research (WI)

Credits: 3

Instruction in academic writing at the college entry level. Assignments progress from essays that review and enhance rhetorical foundations to an introduction of scholarly research. The course promotes as learning outcomes an understanding of rhetorical foundations, such as grammar, audience, and voice; development of an effective writing process that includes peer review and team work; demonstration of research skills and accurate citation of sources; and participation in academic discussions that produce polished, final writings in an e-portfolio.

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Humanities, Endorsements, Reading


ENG 201 Writing and Research about Literature (WI)

Credits: 3

In this course, students will be introduced to the study of short fiction, drama, and poetry. Learning outcomes include an understanding of these genres as distinct types of literature, an ability to analyze literary texts through students’ own writing and other forms of presentation, and the ability to perform research related to such analysis.

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Humanities, Endorsements, Reading


ENG 206 Modern Poetry

Credits: 3

Exploration of the uses of language in poetry; examination of representative 20th century poems. Students will read modern poems, identifying structural patterns and specific uses of language and discerning meaning, and will recognize poetic language used in headlines and advertising.

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Humanities


ENG 247 Imaginative Writing: Poetry and Prose (WI)

Credits: 3

Work in forms such as short story, lyric poem, and creative nonfiction. Students will demonstrate originality and craft in at least one creative genre through a portfolio of writing.

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Humanities


ENG 311 Expository Writing (WI)

Credits: 3

Advanced writing course emphasizing clarity and coherence in expository expression. Students will submit writing portfolios demonstrating ability to fulfill a variety of writing tasks at a level of competence beyond the first year exit level.

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Humanities, Endorsements, K-8 English/Language Arts


ENG 326 Environmental Literature

Credits: 3

This course studies diverse genres that address environmental topics to enable students to develop the ability to assess the rhetorical implications of genre, to identify values within the readings, to articulate their own values, and to understand the tradition and practice of American environmental writing in comparison with other literary and storytelling traditions.

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Humanities


ENG 327 Reading Film as Literature

Credits: 4

This course focuses on narrative film and aspects of narrative that apply to fiction and drama: character, story, and spectacle. It offers the opportunity to understand the evolution of film over the past 100 years, and it will reflect on the ideological underpinnings of film. Students will debate film issues, read selected criticism, and share their critical writing. Students will demonstrate their understanding of critical and theoretical issues in several short papers exploring and analyzing film narrative. They also will heighten their awareness of audience and reflect on their developing sense of film values through a variety of other activities, such as posting to blogs and doing workshops.

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Humanities


ENG 333 Masters of British Literature I

Credits: 3

This historical survey course, which also includes an introduction to critical theory, begins with Beowulf and ends with the sensibility movement in England, with major focus on Chaucer, Donne, Milton, and Swift. Students will recognize literary characteristics and historical context of major writers and apply a specific critical approach.

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Humanities


ENG 334 Masters of British Literature II

Credits: 3

This course succeeds English 333 and continues the study of English literature from the Romantic period through the Victorian era to the present. Students will recognize major literary figures and describe intellectual and historical emphases of each period.

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Humanities


ENG 341 Masters of World Literature (WI)

Credits: 3

Selected readings from various periods and world literatures, all in English translation. Students will discuss works comparatively and discern values, patterns of behavior, and uses of language in various texts.

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Humanities


ENG 344 Media Ecology and the Humanities

Credits: 3

The course introduces students to the critical study of media as environment, with a special emphasis on how culture, religion, the arts, and education systems are affected by media and media change. Course work includes readings from an interdisciplinary text, the critical use and creation of web-based multimedia resources, reflection upon the communication process and engagement in the skillful and informed interpretation of literary, expository, and filmic texts. Students will work both individually and in groups to consider how changes in technology can redefine these aspects of culture and to apply their insights to the contemporary realities of their personal, professional, and civic lives.

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Humanities


ENG 349 Masters of American Literature I

Credits: 3

Surveys major American writers through mid-19th century, with emphasis on Emerson, Thoreau, Hawthorne, Melville, and Douglass. Students will identify major historical periods and implications for literary genres and ideas and will discern meaning in major texts.

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Humanities, Endorsements, K-8 English/Language Arts


ENG 350 Masters of American Literature II

Credits: 3

Surveys American literature from Whitman, Dickinson, and Twain through the present. Students will show awareness of cultural diversity in American literature, discern meaning in major texts, and explain accurately the characteristics of genres and literary periods.

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Humanities, Endorsements, K-8 English/Language Arts


ENG 352 Shakespeare

Credits: 3

Detailed study of several plays. Students will explain historical context, discern meaning in individual plays, and recognize particular uses of language and literary devices.

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Humanities


ENG 365 Masters of English Novel

Credits: 3

Detailed reading of several major novels from the 18th century to the present. Students will explain historical contexts and discern meaning in individual novels.

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Humanities


ENG 380 Topics in Literature

Credits: 1-3

An opportunity for upper division students to study selected topics in literature not offered on a regular basis.

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Humanities


ENG 440, 441, 442 Career Applications in English

Credits: 2-6

Offers Internship options such as research, case studies, commercial/ professional problem-solving, and, for the student employed full-time, the 2-3 credit hour options of site-based analytical projects. Students will meet professional expectations in the workplace.

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Humanities


ENG 497 Independent Study in English

Credits: 1-3

For advanced students with adequate preparation. Written consent of the head of the division required. Student will develop a plan of study in conjunction with a faculty member and fulfill the expectations established in that plan (e.g., producing a well- research critical study or presenting a portfolio of well-crafted creative writing).

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Humanities


ENG 498 Internship in English

Credits: 6-12

A substantive Internship with emphasis on writing. Students will plan a single Internship that generates the number of credit hours desired (typically six). All planning must be done in consultation with the academic advisor and the Director of Internship. Students will meet professional expectations as determined by the site supervisor and will present a portfolio of work samples and reflections upon the learning experience, demonstrating at a minimum competence in writing, social interaction, and self-understanding.

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Humanities


ENG 499 Seminar in English

Credits: 3

The capstone course for English majors, the senior seminar will offer intensive study of a designated literary period, author, or genre and will provide instruction and practice in writing at an advanced level. Students will lead class sessions, apply specific critical approaches, conduct research, and prepare and defend a scholarly final project.

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Humanities


EVHL 300 Environmental Chemistry

Credits: 3

This course will study the chemistry of our environment and the chemistry underlying our modern environmental problems. Discussion will involve the health effects of environmental chemical/toxins and the processes or mechanisms involved. Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to demonstrate knowledge of environmental chemicals and toxins and their relationship to environmental health.

Prerequisites: 8 hours of chemistry

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Science


EVHL 330 Environmental Health

Credits: 4

A lecture, laboratory, field study of the important principles of environmental health. The environmental factors that affect human health and well-being are emphasized. This course provides the basic knowledge and skills necessary to identify, evaluate, and communicate environmental conditions that have an impact on human health and to plan and/or implement strategies to control or manage environmental problems. Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to describe the principles of environmental health, the impact of environmental conditions, and management strategies for environmental problems.

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Science


GOV 105 American Government

Credits: 3

An outline of the structure and process of government at the national level. Upon successful completion of the course, students will demonstrate an understanding of the U.S. Constitution, the federal government and the federal court system, and be able especially to articulate the rights and role of the individual citizen.

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Science


GOV 110 State and Local Government

Credits: 3

A survey of the structure and procedure of state and local governments. Upon successful completion of the course, students will demonstrate an understanding of, and be able to evaluate, the relationship between states and the federal government, variations in law-making at the state level, and proposals for reform.

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Science


HIST 125 U.S. History Survey, 1607-1877

Credits: 3

A topic-driven overview of American history from the colonial era through Reconstruction. Areas of inquiry may include European-Native American contact, effects of religious and political ideas, the influence of mercantilism and capitalism on colonial and national growth, aspects of party development, the rise and effects of slavery and sectionalism, national expansion, and issues related to domestic economic development. Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to define, describe, and explain events broadly related to colonial development, the American Revolution, the Constitution and early national growth, and the Civil War and Reconstruction

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Humanities


HIST 126 U.S. History Survey, 1877-present

Credits: 3

Topical survey of American history from the Gilded Age to the present. Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to define, describe, and explain the rise and effects of big business and industrial capitalism, the outlines of racial segregation and discrimination, the world wars and other military conflicts, economic issues related to the Great Depression and New Deal, and political controversies surrounding the Civil Rights Movement and the Cold War.

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Humanities


HIST 173 Western Civilization to 1350

Credits: 3

A survey of the birth and rise western culture and institutions up to the Renaissance. Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to define, describe and explain the civilizations of ancient Greece and Rome, describe and offer explanations of the rise of Christianity and the early Church, and summarize the growth of economic, political and social institutions in medieval Europe.

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Humanities


HIST 174 Western Civilization since 1350

Credits: 3

An overview of western political, social, and economic institutions and events from the Renaissance to the present. Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to define, describe, and explain the Renaissance and Reformation, the nature of absolutism, the Enlightenment and Scientific Revolution, politics and revolution during the 18th and 19th centuries, European imperialism, the World Wars, and the culmination of the Cold War.

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Humanities


HIST 320 Ante-Bellum America

Credits: 3

America from around 1820 through 1860. Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to analyze, evaluate, and discuss issues related to party formation and political development, the market revolution, war and westward expansion, slavery and the Old South, the anti-slavery movement, sectionalism, and the causes of the Civil War.

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Humanities


HIST 380 Topics

Credits: 3

Specialized courses that provide students with an opportunity to study aspects of history or subjects not ordinarily covered in other courses. Students who successfully complete these courses will demonstrate in-depth understanding of the topic through detailed reading and writing assignments and interaction with the instructor.

Prerequisites: 3.00 GPA and permission of the division chair.

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Humanities


HIST 497 Independent Study

Credits: 3

Individual research into a specific area of history, under the supervision of history faculty. Reading and writing assignments are typically in excess of those required for other history courses. Students will successfully complete such courses only if the instructor is satisfied that student work and comprehension is adequate.

Prerequisites: Independent Study is directed toward advanced students, and must be approved by the division chair.

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Humanities


HIST 498 Internship in History

Credits: 6-12

The internship allows for practical work experience in history. This course is required for all history (non Teacher Education) majors.

Prerequisites: Junior or Senior standing

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Humanities


HIST 499 History Seminar

Credits: 1

Enrolled students shall combine research and writing with their approved Internship. Students are required to develop a comprehensive research project that relates directly to their Internship. A formal paper and a detailed public presentation are also required. Students are expected to work closely with their instructor as the Internship progresses.

Prerequisites: Senior standing

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Humanities


HLTH 200 Substance Abuse

Credits: 2

The student will learn and understand about the uses and abuses of drugs. They will learn about the physiological and psychological processes involved with drug use and abuse, as well as legal implications.

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Education, Majors, Exercise Science and Wellness, Physical Education, Endorsements, Health


HLTH 234 Community Health

Credits: 3

In this class the students will learn about the various facets of community health and what their involvement is. General topics discussed will include (but not be limited to) the following: History; Women, Infants and Children; Adolescents; Adults, Elderly, Insurance; Health Care; Economic; School Health; Emergency Management; and Environment.

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Education, Majors, Exercise Science and Wellness, Physical Education, Endorsements, Athletic Coaching, Health, Physical Education


HLTH 300 Health and Nutrition

Credits: 3

During class, students will learn the basics of nutrition. They will learn about chemical processes involved in nutrition, weight control, balanced diet and illness caused by poor nutrition. Through projects, they will be able to evaluate their own nutritional habits.

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Education, Majors, Early Childhood Education, Exercise Science and Wellness, Physical Education, Endorsements, Athletic Coaching, Early Childhood Education, Health, Physical Education


HLTH 334 Consumer Health & Personal Wellness

Credits: 3

This course is designed so the student can learn 1) factual, scientifically based information about health goods and services and 2) how to become a better consumer by developing or sharpening their skills such as decision-making, values clarification, assertiveness, bargaining, and data collection and analysis.

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Education, Majors, Exercise Science and Wellness, Physical Education, Endorsements, Athletic Coaching, Health, Physical Education


MATH 150 Fundamentals of Mathematics and Problem Solving

Credits: 3

A course that teaches problem solving skills by helping the students define the problem, discover the relevant information, devise a plan, carry out the plan, and look back on the problem solving process. Students completing this course will demonstrate an understanding of following: Logic, Set Theory, Number Systems, Algebraic Manipulation, Graphs and Geometry. The National Council of Teachers of Mathematics (NCTM) standards are emphasized.

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Science, Majors, Early Childhood Education


MATH 162 College Algebra and Trigonometry

Credits: 4

Students satisfactorily completing this course will understand algebraic, exponential, logarithmic, and trigonometric functions. This course serves as a preparation for calculus. Not open to students who have successfully completed high school mathematics through advanced math or calculus except by consent of the instructor.

Prerequisites: A working knowledge of algebra

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Science


MATH 171 Elementary Statistics

Credits: 4

An introduction to probability and statistics. Students satisfactorily completing this course will demonstrate skills in assignment of probability using permutations and combinations, distributions of random variables and statistics, and large sample theory, introduction to estimation and tests of significance. Includes Excel lab.

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Science


MATH 221 Discrete Mathematics

Credits: 3

A problem-solving course using techniques appropriate for finite mathematical structures. Students satisfactorily completing this course will understand sets and logics, graphs, trees, and techniques of counting.

Prerequisites: MATH 162 or equivalent

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Science


MATH 231 Calculus I – Fall

Credits: 4

An introduction to calculus. Students satisfactorily completing this course will understand the differentiation and applications of elementary and transcendental functions.

Prerequisites: MATH 162 or equivalent

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Science


MATH 323 Linear Algebra

Credits: 3

Students satisfactorily completing this course will understand systems of linear equations, matrix algebra, vector spaces, linear transformations, and related topics.

Prerequisites: MATH 231

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Science


MATH 355 Introduction to Sets and Logic

Credits: 3

Students satisfactorily completing this course will be able to read, write and reason mathematically. Topics include elementary logic, sets and their properties, relations, functions, Boolean algebra, and finite and infinite sets.

Prerequisites: MATH 232

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Science


MATH 380 Topics in Mathematics

Credits: 1-3

An intensive study of a topic. The topic selected will depend on student needs and interests, staff interests, and the judgment of the mathematics faculty. May be repeated. Possible topics include: Boolean algebra, probability, Fourier Series, history of mathematics, continued fractions, group theory, Fibonacci Sequences. No more than six hours will be counted toward the major unless recommended by the Division chairperson.

Prerequisites: A minimum of 14 credit hours of college mathematics

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Science


MATH 429 Geometry

Credits: 3

The study of modern elementary geometry. Students satisfactorily completing this course will understand select topics from Euclidean and non-Euclidean geometry including coordinate systems, betweenness, existence theorems, principles of duality, plane separation principle, congruence, exterior angle theorem, and parallelism.

Prerequisites: MATH 355

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Science


MATH 491 Algebraic Structures

Credits: 3

Students satisfactorily completing this course will understand logical development of various algebraic structures. The study will include groups, rings and fields.

Prerequisites: MATH 355

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Science


MATH 497 Independent Study in Mathematics

Credits: 1-3

Independent study by advanced students. A student selects a problem to be studied in consultation with a mathematics professor and works on it independently, with weekly consultations with the professor.

Prerequisites: 20 hours of mathematics and consent of the program coordinator

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Science


MUS 100 Music Lab

Credits: 0-.5

A variety of activities are planned for music lab – activities that extend and supplement courses normally offered including repertoire class - opportunities for students to perform regularly in front of an audience, student conducting, guest speakers, student, faculty, and guest artist performances, error detection, and sight- singing are some of the possible activities.

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Humanities, Endorsements, Music


MUS 123 Diction I

Credits: 1

This course is designed to help students master the basic rules of English, Latin, and Italian lyric diction. A great singer depends heavily on his or her power of expression. Expressive singing brings the full meaning and emotion of the words and thoughts to a performance in addition to singing beautifully and accurately. Serious vocalists seek to find ways to bring words into a more intimate union with the notes.

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Humanities, Endorsements, Music


MUS 124 Diction II

Credits: 1

This course is designed to help students master the basic rules of German and French lyric diction. A great singer depends heavily on his or her power of expression. Expressive singing brings the full meaning and emotion of the words and thoughts to a performance in addition to singing beautifully and accurately. Serious vocalists seek to find ways to bring words into a more intimate union with the notes.

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Humanities, Endorsements, Music


MUS 141 Music Fundamentals

Credits: 2

An introductory course covering the basic elements of music including pitch, notation, rhythm, meter, scales, key signatures, modes, intervals and triads. Upon completion of this course, students will be able to describe and identify elements of musical notation, including pitches in multiple clefs, key signatures and modes and rhythm in multiple meters. Students will also be able to identify major, minor and modal scales and intervals and triads within those scales.

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Humanities


MUS 142 Elementary Harmony

Credits: 2

A continuation of written exercises and keyboard harmony utilizing diatonic triads and seventh chords, nonharmonic tones, and secondary dominants. Analysis and composition of the small musical forms. To be taken with MUS 144. Students successfully completing this course will be able to demonstrate (in notation and, when applicable, at the keyboard) understanding of C clefs, diatonic triads, seventh chords, non-harmonic tones, the medieval modes, secondary dominants and common chord modulation. They will continue to develop the ability to apply the material in practical ways in the performance and teaching of music. They will also become increasingly familiar with music technology applications, particularly FINALÉ.

Prerequisites: MUS 141

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Humanities, Endorsements, Music


MUS 143 Aural Skills I

Credits: 1

Singing of diatonic melodies in bass and treble clefs and in major and minor modes. Introduction to alto and tenor clefs. Dictation of rhythm; of intervals and diatonic melodies; and of harmonic progressions utilizing the principal triads. Students successfully completing this course will be able to identify and sing major, natural and melodic minor scales in solfège (“movable do”), major and minor triads, and all intervals (ascending) within one octave. They will be able to sing, at sight and in solfège, major and minor diatonic melodies in various keys both stepwise and triadic (outlining tonic and dominant triads) in treble and bass clefs, and read rhythms including the division of the beat in simple and compound meters. They will also be able to notate (from aural examples) such melodies and rhythmic patterns (separately). In addition they will be able to identify root position tonic and dominant triads in chorale settings.

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Humanities, Endorsements, Music


MUS 144 Aural Skills II

Credits: 1

A continuation of singing and diatonic melodies in bass, treble, alto and tenor clefs, including modulation to closely-related keys. Dictation of rhythm; of intervals and diatonic melodies; and of harmonic progressions including diatonic triads and seventh chords. Students successfully completing this course will be able to identify and sing (in solfège, “movable do”) the harmonic minor scale, inverted major and minor triads, root position diminished and augmented triads, and all descending intervals within one octave. They will be able to sing, at sight, major and minor diatonic melodies (in treble, bass, alto, or tenor clefs) containing larger and more numerous leaps than those in MUS 143, as well as notate such melodies from aural examples. They will also be able to read rhythms in simple and compound meters including the subdivision of the beat. In addition, they will be able to notate (from aural examples) harmonic progressions containing the principal diatonic harmonies, including inversions.

Prerequisites: MUS 143

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Humanities, Endorsements, Music


MUS 225 Survey of Musical Literature

Credits: 3

The study of music for the liberal arts student. The course is designed to acquaint the student with the structure and application of the most important musical forms and the major periods of music history. No previous musical experience is necessary.

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Humanities


MUS 241 Advanced Harmony: Part Writing and Keyboard

Credits: 2

Written exercises and keyboard harmony utilizing chromatic and extended tertian harmony; remote modulation; styles of writing other than chorale style. Analysis of binary and ternary form. To be taken with MUS 243. Students who successfully complete this course will be able to demonstrate (in notation and, when applicable, at the keyboard) understanding of the principles of harmonic sequence, secondary dominant and leading tone chords, modulation, use of seventh (and larger) chords, chromatic harmony (including mode mixture, Neapolitan sixth and augmented sixth chords), and the basic principles of formal structure. They will also continue to develop their abilities to apply music theory in practical ways, including using analysis as an aid in preparing to perform and teach music, and they will become increasingly fluent with music technology applications, in particular, FINALÉ.

Prerequisites: MUS 142

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Humanities, Endorsements, Music


MUS 243 Aural Skills III

Credits: 1

Singing of chromatic and modal melodies. Dictation of superimposed rhythm, unusual and mixed meters; chromatic melodies and harmonic progressions. It is assumed that the sight-singing proficiency will be passed by the end of the semester. Students successfully completing this course will be able to identify and sing modal scales (in solfège, “movable do”), seventh chords (major, minor, diminished and half diminished). They will be able to sing (in solfège), at sight, melodies that modulate, and modal and chromatic melodies, as well as notate such melodies from aural examples. They will also be able to read complex rhythms in simple and compound meters. In addition, they will be able to notate harmonic progressions employing both diatonic and chromatic harmonies.

Prerequisites: MUS 144

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Humanities, Endorsements, Music


MUS 244 Aural Skills IV

Credits: 2

Sight singing of advanced rhythmic patterns in simple and compound meter with major and minor scales, modes, and pentatonic scales. Students successfully completing this course will be able to sing and identify non-chord tones, secondary dominants, Neapolitan sixth chords and other chromatic harmonies. Students will also perform rhythmic and melodic examples at sight and identify diatonic and chromatic chords in 4-part harmony. It is assumed that the sight-singing proficiency will be passed by the end of the semester.

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Humanities


MUS 304 Jazz Theory and Improvisation

Credits: 2

A historical study of twentieth century jazz music in America via scales, chords, and harmonic progressions with an emphasis on performance applications to traditional jazz band instrumentation: sax, trumpet, trombone and rhythm section. Including a study of jazz band chart reading and a basic understanding of keyboard voicings and scoring for combos and big bands.

Prerequisites: Music 141-2, 241, (Music theory)

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Humanities


MUS 328 Materials of Music

Credits: 3

A study of counterpoint, form and analysis, contemporary styles and composition. Students who successfully complete this course will be able to demonstrate an understanding of the components and procedures of musical structural design, and their significance as tools in enhancing musical understanding. They will be able to analyze compositions with respect to micro- and macro-formal structure, as well as identify contrapuntal techniques when applicable. In addition, the student will be able to analyze structural elements in contemporary works, including tonal and non-tonal systems. They will also continue to develop their abilities to apply music theory in practical ways, including using analysis as an aid in preparing to perform and teach music, and they will become increasingly fluent with music technology applications, in particular, FINALÉ.

Prerequisites: MUS 241 or consent of instructor

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Humanities, Endorsements, Music


MUS 353 History of Music (WI)

Credits: 3

A study of the history of music from the early Christian era to 1750, based on stylistic and formal analysis, as well as performance practices. Students will develop skill in discerning various musical styles from the written score and from listening to recordings. Students will develop skill in discussing the elements of musical style based on their experiences with the scores and the recordings. They will develop their vocabulary to describe the various components of music—melody, rhythm, harmony, texture, instrumentation, orchestration, form, etc.) Students will synthesize an array of skills that have been acquired in their introductory music courses. In this course students will make connections between assigned reading, class discussion of style and the assigned listening. Through their study of the music from the early Christian era to 1750, students will learn standard interpretive skills appropriate to the various periods of music history and begin to have an understanding of the aesthetics of western music. Students will develop skill in discerning various musical styles from the written score and from listening to recordings.

Prerequisites: Writing Intensive Course: Successful Completion of English 105 and 201 required. Prerequisite: MUS 142 or permission of instructor.

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Humanities, Endorsements, Music


MUS 354 History of Music (WI)

Credits: 3

A study of the history of music from 1750 to the present, based on stylistic and formal analysis, as well as performance practices. Students will develop skill in discerning various musical styles from the written score and from listening to recordings. Students will develop skill in discussing the elements of musical style based on their experiences with the scores and the recordings. They will develop their vocabulary to describe the various components of music—melody, rhythm, harmony, texture, instrumentation, orchestration, form, etc.) Students will synthesize an array of skills that have been acquired in their introductory music courses. In this course students will make connections between assigned reading, class discussion of style and the assigned listening. Through their study of the music from 1750 to the present, students will learn standard interpretive skills appropriate to the various periods of music history and begin to have an understanding of the aesthetics of western music. Students will develop skill in discerning various musical styles from the written score and from listening to recordings.

Prerequisites: Writing Intensive Course: Successful Completion of English 105 and 201 required. Prerequisite: MUS 142 or permission of instructor.

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Humanities, Endorsements, Music


MUS 355 Elementary Music Methods and Curriculum

Credits: 2

Techniques for teaching elementary classroom music. Includes techniques in, and experience teaching, reading songs, rote songs, two-part songs, listening lessons, movement activities and creative lessons. Students will develop musical skills and gain knowledge of basic music elements and terminology used in the elementary music classroom; explore and practicing common methods of elementary music instruction (Orff, Kodaly, Dalcroze, Gordon); incorporate rhythm, melody, harmony and movement activities in the elementary school classroom via: developing rhythmic musicianship through the practice and study of rhythm instruments; demonstrate and develop basic harmonic understanding via performing on piano, the autoharp, guitar and/or ukulele; demonstrate proficiency in basic tonal musicianship through singing and the study of melodic instruments including the song flute (recorder) by reading and performing short songs in a variety of keys; practice and demonstrate movement and rhythm via folk dances; demonstrate effective lesson plan writing. Includes thirty (30) hours observation in the schools.

Prerequisites: MUS 142 or permission of instructor

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Humanities


MUS 356 Secondary Music Methods and Curriculum

Credits: 2

Develops a philosophy for teaching music and skills for teaching secondary music including general music, the changing voice, rehearsal techniques, recruiting, evaluation, motivation, public relations, and administrative responsibilities. In Secondary Music Methods students will study and learn skills that will prepare them to be choral music educators primarily at the middle school and high school levels. Concepts and skills covered will include creating a philosophy of choral music education, learning techniques for recruiting and motivating singers, planning and building a choral music program, processing information and managing a choral program, working with adolescent singers, discipline in rehearsal, choosing quality literature, rehearsal and vocal techniques.

Prerequisites: MUS 142

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Humanities, Endorsements, Music


MUS 357 Instrumental Conducting

Credits: 2

An intermediate course in polishing of conducting skills with emphasis on study of and application of rehearsal techniques. Experience conducting an instrumental group is provided to become skilled in use of expressive gestures, control of tempo changes and changing meters. Knowledge of common transpositions and score reading are included. Students will demonstrate adequate proficiency conducting instrumental music ensembles through in-class exercises, recorded musical excerpts, leading small ensembles in music lab presentations. Students will demonstrate proficiency conducting music in common and uncommon meter signatures; use gestures to indicate fermatas, rubato phrasing, cuing, dynamics and expression; demonstrate music theory proficiency by analyzing works through score study and preparation; reinforce and demonstrate adequate piano skills (i.e. condensed score reading from the piano, and on-the-spot transpositions).

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Humanities, Endorsements, Music


MUS 358 Choral Conducting

Credits: 2

Organization and conducting of choral groups. This course is designed to follow Basic Conducting and provide each student with a higher level of ability in all facets of the conducting art. Throughout the semester, students will more thoroughly study gesture, a system of score study (including preparation of scores and written assignments), terms, transpositions, complex meters, communication, and disciplines that will help them prepare to conduct and direct a choral ensemble of his/her own. Students will be evaluated on ability to read and analyze a choral score, research music styles, lead rehearsal, conduct with appropriate gesture, phrasing, musical style and confidence.

Prerequisites: MUS 251 or consent of instructor

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Humanities, Endorsements, Music


MUS 380 Topics

Credits: 1-3

An opportunity for upper division students to study selected topics in music not offered on a regular basis (piano pedagogy, church music, composition, and music education materials).

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Humanities


MUS 386 Instrumental Methods and Curriculum

Credits: 2

Develops a philosophy and approach to teaching all levels of instrumental music based on music learning sequences for rhythmic and tonal context and performance technique. Includes techniques in and experience performing and teaching brass, percussion, woodwind and string instruments. Also includes observations, marching band techniques, teaching practicum. In conjunction with EDUC 263 Participation and Analysis in the Schools. Students will acquire skills inherent to the art of successful instrumental music teaching in elementary and secondary schools including but not limited to: techniques and methods for teaching woodwind, brass, percussion, and string instruments for beginning through advanced students; demonstrate effective concert band, jazz band, marching band rehearsal techniques; demonstrate proficiency in marching band drill writing using the PYWARE© computer program; demonstrate strategies for recognizing and correcting student performance problems including developing the embouchure, breathing and phrasing, and tone production.

Prerequisites: MUS 113, 115, 117, 118, and 119 or consent of the instructor

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Humanities, Endorsements, Music


MUS 398 Practicum

Credits: 2-3

Often serves as a pre-internship experience or may be an on-campus Internship under the supervision of faculty or staff.

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Humanities


MUS 440, 441, 442 Career Applications

Credits: 2-6

Internship projects that do not fit a six-credit hour internship.

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Humanities


MUS 481 Arranging

Credits: 2

Study of principles, practices, and techniques of writing and arranging vocal and instrumental groups. Students will arrange vocal and instrumental music for available performers. Students will develop practical music arranging skills by learning to adapt and create musical scores for specific instrumental and vocal ensembles. Students will become proficient using the music notation program FINALÉ including developing the following skills: arranging pieces with melodies, chords and lyrics; arranging small ensemble works; ranges, transpositions, timbre qualities and characteristics of woodwind, brass, strings and percussion instruments; arrange works in appropriate styles; develop practical applications of music theory and harmony through mastering a 4-part contemporary voicing method applicable to small groups, jazz bands and/or vocal jazz ensembles; develop advanced music computer skills, importing, exporting, adapting and transcribing MIDI files into FINALÉ notation.

Prerequisites: MUS 328

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Humanities, Endorsements, Music


MUS 497 Independent Study in Music

Credits: 1-2

For advanced music students with adequate preparation. Written consent of the head of the program required.

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Humanities


MUS 498 Internship

Credits: 6-14

The internship allows for a substantive Internship for music students not seeking teaching licensure. Internships will be tailored to the student’s particular interest and developing skill. The number of hours involved with a particular internship will determine the number of credit hours to be earned. Normally an internship is completed in the senior year. All plans and decisions will be made in consultation with the student’s academic advisor and the Director of Internship.

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Humanities


NUR 180 Integration: Human Diseases and Disorders–Spring–Elective

Credits: 3

The study of human diseases utilizes an integrated approach, which guides the student in his/her study and learning of human physiology. The course will integrate human learning and the development of strong study habits to promote academic success. The successful student will acquire an understanding of the relationships between anatomical structures and their physiological functions in the human body. Students will critically think about how normal processes promote homeostasis within the body. Additionally, students will be able to analyze the characteristics associated with the disease processes when pathological changes occur.

Prerequisites: Unable to meet benchmark for NUR 213 and by permission of instructor.

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Nursing


NUR 200 Introduction to Health Care Terminology – Fall

Credits: 1

Introduction to Health Care Terminology focuses on key concepts of terminology used in health care. The student who successfully completes the course will be able to demonstrate the use of health care terminology and discuss the relationship between nursing, medicine and allied health fields and standardized health care terminology. This course is open to both nursing and non-nursing majors and will benefit the student pursuing a health career.

Prerequisites: ENG 105, BIO 241, BIO 242, CHEM 105

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Nursing


NUR 205 Fundamentals of Nursing I – Fall (WI)

Credits: 3

Fundamentals of Nursing I is a course focusing on key concepts of baccalaureate nursing education. The student who successfully completes this course will be able to describe the impact of the health delivery systems on nursing functions, identify family-based and community-based nursing practice and describe how critical thinking skills contribute to the leadership role of the nurse. Students will be able to identify the use of ethical, legal, spiritual and cultural values in professional relationships.

Prerequisites: ENG 105, BIO 241 and BIO 242, and CHEM 105.

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Nursing


NUR 206 Fundamentals of Nursing II – Spring

Credits: 4

Introduction to Nursing Practice presents the student to professional nursing as a science, a practice, and a process. The course presents an overview of the interrelationships of nursing, person, health, and environment. Emphasis is on nursing practice that provides for health promotion and assistance to adult clients to obtain their optimal level of functioning. Students successfully completing this course will be able to demonstrate the skills of critical thinking, nursing process, therapeutic communication and physical assessment as they apply to professional nursing practice.

Prerequisites: NUR 200, NUR 205, NUR 213 and CNA status.

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Nursing


NUR 208 Physical Assessment – Spring

Credits: 3

Introduction to Physical Assessment focusses on physical and psychosocial health across the lifespan. The student who successfully completes the course will be able to demonstrate physical assessment techniques, interviewing skills and health risks assessment and utilize health care terminology as it relates to physical assessment.

Prerequisites: NUR 200, NUR 205, NUR 213 and CNA status

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Nursing


NUR 213 Basic Concepts of Pathophysiology – Fall

Credits: 4

Basic Concepts of Pathophysiology examines pathophysiological and psychological aspects of alterations in major body systems. Emphasis is on holistic nature of human responses to health alterations. Understanding disease processes promotes better decision making in assessing, planning, and implementing care of clients and is essential for professional nursing practice. The student who successfully completes this course will understand the holistic approach of human responses to health alterations of the major body systems.

Prerequisites: ENG 105, BIO 241, BIO 242 and CHEM 105

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Nursing


NUR 214 Basic Concepts of Pharmacology – Spring

Credits: 3

Basic concepts of pharmacology is a survey of medications typically used in the diagnosis, treatment, and prevention of disease. Consideration is given to indications for use, administration, absorption, action, metabolism, and excretion of drugs. Students will be able to apply the nursing process to the role the nurse takes in the administration, evaluation, and education in pharmacology.

Prerequisites: NUR 200, NUR 205, NUR 213 and is a service-learning course

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Nursing


NUR 301 Bridge to Professional Nursing – Fall (WI)

Credits: 5

Bridge to Professional Nursing is designed as a transition to baccalaureate nursing education. The student who successfully completes this course will be able to integrate the concepts of nursing, person, health, and environment into professional nursing practice.

Prerequisites: Completion of an ADN or Diploma nursing program and RN licensure.

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Nursing


NUR 305 Nursing Care of Adults I – Fall (WI)

Credits: 5

Nursing Care of Adults I focuses on professional nursing practices that assist clients to attain an optimal level of health by responding to their needs. The student will be able to identify factors that promote the client’s ability to perform self-care activities including basic human needs, individual client development and the environment and correlate nursing diagnoses, interventions and outcomes when caring for adult client experiencing changes in their health status. Students will be able to analyze situations in which ethical, legal, spiritual and cultural values are integrated into professional nursing practice

Prerequisites: NUR 206, NUR 208 and NUR 214.

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Nursing


NUR 306 Nursing Care of Mental Health Clients – Spring

Credits: 5

Nursing Care of Mental Health Clients focuses on professional nursing practice that assists the client and family who are experiencing conditions of altered stability and emotional disorders. The student who successfully completes this course will be able to integrate critical thinking, the nursing process, research and holistic practices as it pertains to care of clients with mental health disorders. Content includes specific client responses to developmental issues and disorders of eating, mood, thought, behavior, and substance abuse.

Prerequisites: NUR 305 and NUR 307

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Nursing


NUR 307 Nursing Care of Childbearing Families – Fall

Credits: 5

Nursing Care of Childbearing Families focuses on nursing students learning how to examine the health care needs of women and their families throughout the reproductive years. The student who successfully completes this course will be able to demonstrate critical thinking skills, integrate the nursing process into practice, utilize up to date research, and practice the art of holistic care. Content includes pre-pregnancy, pregnancy, childbirth, and post-partum and newborn states.

Prerequisites: NUR 206, NUR 208 and NUR 214

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Nursing


NUR 308 Nursing Care of Children – Spring

Credits: 5

Nursing Care of Children focuses on nursing students learning how to practice the art of nursing for children from birth through adolescence. The student who successfully completes this course will be able to demonstrate critical thinking skills, integrate the nursing process into practice, utilize up to date research, and practice the art of holistic care. Content includes support and education of the healthy child and family experiencing illness, and knowledge of child development.

Prerequisites: NUR 305 and NUR 307

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Nursing


NUR 405 Nursing Care in the Community – Fall

Credits: 4

Nursing Care in the Community focuses on professional nursing practice that assists the community as a client. Content includes concepts of environmental health, epidemiology and care of the community. The student will understand community as a client is defined as an individual, family, aggregate, or group. The student will be able to integrate critical thinking, the nursing process, research and holistic care as it pertains to the community.

Prerequisites: NUR 306 and NUR 308 or Completion of an ADN or Diploma nursing program and RN licensure

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Nursing


NUR 406 Nursing Care of Older Adults – Spring

Credits: 3

Nursing Care of the Older Adult focuses on professional nursing practice that takes a holistic approach to nursing care for the older population. Emphasis is on the integration of critical thinking, the nursing process, research, and holistic care. Content includes physical, psychological, social, cultural, spiritual, and economic aspects of aging. A strong foundation on the normal aging process leads to concepts in promoting health and wellness in addition to common health care problems among the elderly and their related nursing care. An overview of the latest thinking on current topics including chronic illness and end-of-life will be presented.

Prerequisites: NUR 405 and NUR 407 or completion of an ADN or diploma nursing program and RN licensure

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Nursing


NUR 407 Nursing Care of Adults II – Fall

Credits: 6

In Nursing Care of Adults II, students will be engaged in learning how individuals adapt to changes in health status when at risk due to development and environmental stressors. The student who successfully completes this course will be prepared for professional nursing practice as it relates to acute alterations in oxygenation, hematology, cardiac perfusion, and urinary function.

Prerequisites: NUR 306 and NUR 308

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Nursing


NUR 408 Nursing Care of Adults III – Spring

Credits: 6

In Nursing Care of Adults III, students will be engaged in learning how individuals adapt to changes in health status when at risk due to development and environmental stressors. The student who successfully completes this course will be prepared for professional nursing practice as it relates to acute alterations in elimination, digestion, metabolism, reproduction, mobility, and sensation.

Prerequisites: NUR 405 and NUR 407

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Nursing


NUR 410 Nursing Leadership and Management – Spring

Credits: 2

Nursing Leadership and Management focuses on the study of nursing organizational, leadership and management theories and their supporting concepts as they relate to professional nursing. The student will be able to integrate critical thinking, decision- making, delegation, communication, power and conflict resolution as it contributes to the leadership role of the professional nurse.

Prerequisites: NUR 405 and NUR 407 or Completion of an ADN or Diploma nursing program and RN licensure

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Nursing


NUR 411 Nursing Internship – Spring

Credits: 1

Nursing Internship is an independent internship occurring in a variety of health care settings to facilitate role transition from student to professional nurse and lifelong learning. Students who successfully complete this course will be able to apply knowledge gained from previous course work and demonstrate the ability to design, provide, manage, and coordinate care.

Prerequisites: NUR 405 and NUR 407

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Nursing


NUR 412 NCLEX-RN® Preparation – Spring

Credits: 1

NUR 412 NCLEX RN Preparation: NCLEX-RN (National Council Licensure Examination for Registered Nurses) preparation is designed to enhance the ability to meet the challenges of passing the Registered Nurse licensure examination. Students who successfully complete this course will be able to demonstrate the competencies needed to perform safely and effectively as a newly licensed, entry-level registered nurse. This class is restricted to the Pre-licensure BSN and LPN to BSN.

Prerequisites: NUR 405 and NUR 407

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Nursing


NUR 413 Nursing Research – Fall (WI)

Credits: 3

Nursing Research is an introduction to the concepts and process of research and Evidence-Based Practice (EBP) in nursing. The focus is on understanding research and its foundation for nursing practice. As a consumer of research, the student will be able to understand the various types of research, and which type is used for exploring different phenomena. The student will also be exposed to evidence based practice, and it’s importance in healthcare.

Prerequisites: NUR 306 and NUR 308, or completion of an ADN or diploma nursing program and RN licensure and math 171. Writing intensive course.

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Nursing


NUR 423 Advanced Pathophysiology

Credits: 4

Advanced Concepts of Pathophysiology examines pathophysiological and psychological aspects of alterations in major body systems. Emphasis is on the holistic nature of human responses to health alterations. Understanding disease processes promotes better decision making in assessing, planning, and implementing care of clients and is essential for professional nursing practice.

Prerequisites: Completion of an ADN or Diploma and RN licensure

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Nursing


PE 107 Dance and Movement

Credits: 3

Survey of dance and dance history with emphasis on the relationship of dance and dance forms to the societies in which they developed. Development of knowledge and skill in folk and square dances, American country dances and ballroom dancing, cultural influences of folk arts. Participation in a variety of dances for school and adult recreation and lecture.

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Education, Majors, Exercise Science and Wellness, Physical Education, Endorsements, Physical Education


PE 108 Dance and Movement for Music Majors

Credits: 2

Survey of dance and dance history with emphasis on the relationship of dance and dance forms to the societies in which they developed. Development of knowledge and skill in folk, American country dances and ballroom dancing, cultural influences of folk arts. Participation in a variety of dances for school and adult recreation.

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Education, Majors, Physical Education, Physical Education


PE 109 Functional Fitness & Personal Wellness

Credits: 0-1

The purpose of this class is to integrate principles of Personal Wellness into the Functional Movement Screen system (FMS) on an introductory level. Individuals will gain understanding of how concepts of Personal Wellness and the FMS system work together to promote overall health, injury prevention strategies, corrective exercise strategies and balanced wellness practices to help enhance personal fitness and health for a lifetime. This class is designed to provide basic knowledge, experience, practice and application of the FMS through in-class and experiential learning projects. The course will provide students with workplace-ready skills and resources in physical education, exercise science, sports medicine and personal health and wellness.

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Education, Majors, Physical Education, Endorsements, Physical Education


PE 122 Yoga

Credits: 0-1

This course is designed to introduce students to the basic asana (postures), breathing techniques and relaxation benefits of yoga. Students will learn via experience how intentional movement, coupled with breath work, can assist in stress-reduction, deeper relaxation and mental clarity.

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Education, Majors, Physical Education, Physical Education


PE 123 First Fit

Credits: 0-1

FIRST FIT is a basic physical fitness program for beginners and/or for individuals who need individualized fitness programming. Learning outcomes focus on the learning and application of corrective progressive exercise techniques and principles, physical readiness assessments, and fitness evaluation and training through an extensive diversified program. Participants will develop a personalized training log. Exercise Science and Wellness majors are encouraged to enroll in this course as an Exercise Science and Wellness Lab with the opportunity to enhance their pre-professional practices.

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Education, Majors, Physical Education, Physical Education


PE 125 Introduction to Exercise Science and Wellness

Credits: 3

The student will learn of the history, evolution and diversity of career opportunities in exercise science and wellness. This course will provide students with opportunities to discover and reflect on a broad field that includes aspiring vocations in sport, fitness, physical activity sciences as well as career areas in the profession (teaching), the discipline (scholarly), and the rapidly growing new professions (applied careers such as sports management). Students will understand what is involved in techniques of teaching exercise science and wellness, modern trends, and job market possibilities.

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Education, Majors, Exercise Science and Wellness


PE 133 Core n Tone

Credits: 0-1

CORE n TONE presents intermediate to advance individual and small group fitness sessions focused from the inner core to full body training experiences. CORE n TONE activities focus on refining exercise technique while conditioning through anaerobic and aerobic high intensity interval training. CORE n TONE includes physical readiness assessment, fitness evaluation and training. Participants will receive a personalized CORE n TONE training log.

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Education, Majors, Exercise Science and Wellness, Physical Education, Athletic Coaching, Health, Physical Education


PE 143 Prime Fit

Credits: 0-1

PRIME FIT presents intermediate to advance high intensity interval training fitness sessions focused on enhancing flexibility, balance, stability, steadiness and mobility based on core development, posture and building through full body training experiences. PRIME FIT activities focus on refining exercise technique while conditioning through anaerobic and aerobic body weight and suspension training; fitness sessions also includes strength, power, endurance, and stamina activities. PRIME FIT includes physical readiness assessment, fitness evaluation and training. Exercise Science and Wellness majors are encouraged to enroll in this course as an opportunity to enhance their pre-professional practices.

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Education, Majors, Exercise Science and Wellness, Physical Education, Athletic Coaching, Health


PE 212 Coaching Authorization

Credits: 4

This course meets the State of Iowa’s criteria to receive one’s coaching authorization. In this course the students will complete 10 contact hours of Theory of Coaching, five contact hours of Coaching Ethics, 10 contact hours of Anatomy and Function, 10 contact hours in Physical and Mental Development, and 20 contact hours in Prevention, Care and Treatment of Athletic Injuries. The student will receive the appropriate forms to submit to the State at the completion of this class.

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Education, Majors, Physical Education, Endorsements, Athletic Coaching, Physical Education


PE 221 Team Sports

Credits: 3

The students will learn the skills, rules and teaching techniques involved in Team Sports. They will understand how individuals learn and be able to communicate these skills as they teach each other and outside groups from the community.

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Education, Majors, Exercise Science and Wellness, Physical Education, Endorsements, Athletic Coaching, Physical Education


PE 223 Individual Sports

Credits: 3

The students will learn the skills, rules and teaching techniques involved in activities considered to be of an individual nature. They will understand how individuals learn and be able to communicate these skills as they teach each other and outside groups from the community.

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Education, Majors, Exercise Science and Wellness, Physical Education, Endorsements, Athletic Coaching, Physical Education


PE 225 Introduction to Physical Education

Credits: 3

The student will learn of the history of human movement, respective evolution of trends, and the influence towards lifestyle wellness including occupational opportunities in the greater world of physical education, exercise science, health, wellness and fitness. Students will understand what is involved in the techniques of teaching individuals and groups.

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Education, Majors, Exercise Science and Wellness, Physical Education, Endorsements, Athletic Coaching, Physical Education


PE 231 First Aid

Credits: 1

This is a basic first aid course. The students will learn how to treat various health problems including wound care through this course.

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Humanities, Division of Nursing, Division of Science, Psychology, Division of Business, Major, Business Administration, Minor, Business Administration, Economics, Division of Wesleyan Studies, Division of Education, Majors, Exercise Science and Wellness, Physical Education, Endorsements, Athletic Coaching, Health, Physical Education


PE 250 Motor Learning

Credits: 2

This course is designed to introduce the student to major concepts within motor control and motor learning across the human lifespan. Both neural and behavioral levels of analyses will be discussed. The course content is relevant to those who wish to better understand how we control our movements and for those who will be engaged in teaching motor skills, be that as an educator, therapist, trainer, or clinician.

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Education, Majors, Exercise Science and Wellness, Physical Education, Endorsements, Physical Education


PE 260 Scientific Aspects of Strength Development

Credits: 2

This course is designed to explore the nature of muscular strength and development utilizing the physiological principles of physical conditioning. This course provides the background for the students to successfully complete the Certified Strength and Conditioning; and Certified Personal Trainer exam offered by the National Strength and Conditioning Association. It provides students with practical experience at program design for a variety of populations.

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Education, Majors, Exercise Science and Wellness, Physical Education, Endorsements, Physical Education


PE 262 Athletic Coaching: Baseball and Softball

Credits: 2

The student will learn coaching techniques, theory, fundamentals, conditioning, strategies, practice setup, event preparation and rules according to their associations.

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Education, Majors, Exercise Science and Wellness, Physical Education, Endorsements, Athletic Coaching, Physical Education


PE 264 Athletic Coaching: Track and Field

Credits: 1

The student will learn coaching techniques, theory, fundamentals, conditioning, strategies, practice setup, event preparation and rules according to their associations.

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Education, Majors, Exercise Science and Wellness, Physical Education, Endorsements, Athletic Coaching, Physical Education


PE 266 Athletic Coaching: Volleyball

Credits: 1

The student will learn coaching techniques, theory, fundamentals, conditioning, strategies, practice setup, event preparation and rules according to their associations.

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Education, Majors, Exercise Science and Wellness, Physical Education, Endorsements, Athletic Coaching, Physical Education


PE 267 Athletic Coaching: Football

Credits: 2

The student will learn coaching techniques, theory, fundamentals, conditioning, strategies, practice setup, event preparation and rules according to their associations.

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Education, Majors, Exercise Science and Wellness, Physical Education, Endorsements, Athletic Coaching, Physical Education


PE 268 Athletic Coaching: Basketball (Coed)

Credits: 2

The student will learn coaching techniques, theory, fundamentals, conditioning, strategies, practice setup, event preparation and rules according to their associations.

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Education, Majors, Exercise Science and Wellness, Physical Education, Endorsements, Athletic Coaching, Physical Education


PE 269 Athletic Coaching: Soccer (Coed)

Credits: 1

The student will learn coaching techniques, theory, fundamentals, conditioning, strategies, practice setup, event preparation and rules according to their associations.

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Majors, Exercise Science and Wellness, Physical Education, Endorsements, Athletic Coaching, Physical Education


PE 270 Theory of Coaching

Credits: 2

An orientation to coaching. Students will learn a broad philosophic treatment of sports, principles and practices that are common to all coaching areas. They will learn about ethics involved in coaching. This is a coed class.

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Education, Majors, Exercise Science and Wellness, Physical Education, Endorsements, Athletic Coaching, Physical Education


PE 290 Curriculum Instruction & Design PE K-12

Credits: 2

Students will study the skills and techniques that successful teachers use to make classes appropriate and beneficial for instruction. Course will include curriculum design, movement education through the integration of instructional practices, teaching strategies, knowledge of adaptations to physical activity, sequencing of developmentally appropriate content and activities, and assessment practices.

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Education, Majors, Physical Education, Endorsements, Physical Education


PE 341 Movement Exploration and Adapted Physical Education

Credits: 3

The students will look at and discuss the topics of developmental, remedial, and corrective programs for physical education. Students will also learn and understand the subject of motor learning or achievement exploration as related to children and youth.

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Education, Majors, Physical Education, Endorsements, Physical Education


PE 352 Kinesiology (WI)

Credits: 3

The students will learn, through a detailed study, about the muscle and articulations of the human body. They will learn and understand the movements and actions of the muscles and articulations in relation to good posture and proper application of skills.

Prerequisites: BIO 241, English 105 & 201

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Education, Majors, Exercise Science and Wellness, Physical Education, Endorsements, Athletic Coaching, Health, Physical Education


PE 356 Principles, Assessment and Research in Physical Education

Credits: 3

Students will be able to define physical education and its philosophy and the criteria of related sciences in dictating guiding principles for a program of physical education. They will collect and utilize date to compare subjects tested to the norms. They will read and evaluate research as consumers and learn to read research critically. The students will also learn and discuss techniques of evaluation related to achievement of students from grades 7 – 12.

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Education, Majors, Exercise Science and Wellness, Physical Education, Endorsements, Physical Education


PE 381 Fitness Evaluation and Training

Credits: 3

This class will give the students an opportunity to review and study in depth, the theories and research that have been learned in other classes. Students will be able to put their knowledge to use as they will apply assessments to various individuals and then set up a program for them to follow. The students will supervise their programs and re-assess them at the end of a set period of time.

Prerequisites: Junior or higher standing

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Education, Majors, Exercise Science and Wellness, Physical Education, Physical Education


PE 398 Practicum in Exercise Science

Credits: 3

Students will apply what they have learned in various classes to making plans and leading others in exercise programs. This allows the student in Exercise Science to have some practical experience.

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Education, Majors, Exercise Science and Wellness, Physical Education, Physical Education


PE 482 Prevention, Care and Treatment of Athletic Injuries

Credits: 3

Students will learn about the basics of prevention of injuries, the type of injuries and how to care for and treat them. Students will learn basic anatomy as it applies to athletic injuries. They will understand the knowledge of learning anatomy and how it applies to understanding injury and injury prevention.

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Education, Majors, Exercise Science and Wellness, Physical Education, Endorsements, Athletic Coaching, Physical Education


PE 484 Physiology of Exercise

Credits: 3

The student will learn, understand and apply the knowledge how exercise affects the physiology of the human body. They will learn how nutrition, exercise and rest affects the human body before, during and after exercise. This will lead to an understanding of physical conditioning and weight control during exercise.

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Education, Majors, Exercise Science and Wellness, Physical Education, Endorsements, Health, Physical Education


PE 493 Organization, Administration and Curriculum Development of Secondary Physical Education and Athletics

Credits: 3

The students will learn and discuss the philosophy, aim and national standards of physical education in developing programs in curricula in secondary physical education. This course is designed so the students will become familiar with and be able to use the standards and policies involved in organization, management, curriculum and supervision of the secondary physical education program (5-12) and athletics.

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Education, Majors, Physical Education, Endorsements, Physical Education


PE 498 Internship in Exercise Science and Wellness

Credits: 6

This is where the students get to use the knowledge and skills they have learned and developed through the course work of their major. It is used as practical experience in the “real world.” It is also used to discover potential career opportunities for the student in Exercise Science and Wellness.

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Education, Majors, Exercise Science and Wellness, Physical Education, Endorsements, Athletic Coaching, Health, Physical Education


PHIL 201 Introduction to Philosophy

Credits: 3

An introduction to the ways in which humanity makes sense of life, and the ways in which this is done. The nature of philosophy or self-conscious thinking is explored. Evaluation is given to competing positions with a view to developing an adequate philosophy of life. Successful students will: demonstrate general critical thinking/ reading skills; engage in reasoned discussion of issues/topics with respect for other points of view; apply civic values to contemporary issues and problems; develop a practical model for learning at the college level.

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Humanities


PHIL 215 Ethics for Life and Career

Credits: 3

This course explores the ethical dimensions of human experience, especially with respect to work, professions, careers, and vocations. What is demanded of us as we enter into various careers? What would excellence in these fields require? Are there basic rules governing each profession, and if so, what broader goals do these rules serve? Are there basic rules or principles guiding human life in general? In all of these spheres of life, what does it mean to be good?

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Humanities


PHIL 230 Critical Reasoning

Credits: 3

This course focuses on the various skills required for reasoning well, because reasoning poorly can undermine one’s life. The skills required for reasoning well include logic, careful attention to language, a sense of relevance, clarity of expression, discrimination among causes, listening, analysis of complex ideas, and self-examination. Students will examine a wide variety of case studies, arguments, issues, and theories in order to develop the critical skills outlined above. In order to develop their own intellectual and rhetorical skills, students will offer their own arguments, engage in debates, and construct their own philosophy of critical thinking.

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Humanities


PHIL 306 Philosophy of Religion

Credits: 3

This course explores issues that arise when human beings reflect on religious experience. Given religious experience, what does it mean? What is its status in relation to other aspects of life, and what are its basic elements and foundations? And what is religious experience really about—God, human needs, social habits, spirituality, all of the above? Students will: explore a wide range of views, assessing their various strengths and weaknesses; demonstrate development of general critical thinking/reading skills; examine the roles that religious values play in human life; examine the ways religious ideas address the concerns of human life and; and develop skills for communicating their basic values and views to others.

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Humanities


PHIL 380 Topics in Philosophy

Credits: 3

Courses providing students with an opportunity to study ideas, movements and institutions in philosophy not ordinarily covered extensively in other courses. Possible topics include: Psychology of Religion, Philosophy of History, and Aesthetics.

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Humanities


PHYS 220 General Physics II - Spring

Credits: 4

A continuation of PHYS 210. Deals principally with electricity and magnetism, electromagnetic phenomena, light, ray optics, and physical optics.

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Science


PSYC 131 General Psychology

Credits: 3

This course provides a broad overview of the science of psychology including its main sub-disciplines, such as abnormal psychology, motivation, personality, memory, learning, emotions, therapy and biopsychology. By completing this course, students should be able to demonstrate an increased understanding of themselves and others, show appreciation for the nature and range of the science of psychology, identify the career possibilities that are available in the field of psychology and show themselves proficient in the scientific methods employed in psychological research.

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Science, Psychology


PSYC 205 The Family - Spring

Credits: 3

This course examines the basic dynamics of family relationships from both psychological and sociological perspectives. By completing this course, students should be able to explain the major family structures and the family life cycle, identify typical patterns that develop within families, show proficiency in the practical skills for handling family conflict and describe the reciprocal influence of family life, culture and society.

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Science, Psychology, Endorsements, Health, K-8 Social Studies


PSYC 209 Social Psychology - Spring

Credits: 3

The purpose of this course is to introduce the field of social psychology. There are three major sub-goals: (1) To introduce the ways in which social psychologists think about and approach the world. One of the recurring themes will be that social psychology relies on experimental studies of the social processes that surround us in everyday life. The results of such experiments sometimes do, and sometimes do not, support intuitions that people might have about social behavior. (2) To introduce the body of knowledge and underlying principles that currently exist in the field. (3) To encourage thought about the implications of social-psychological research for daily life.

Prerequisites: SOC 100 or PSYC 131

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Science, Psychology


PSYC 240 Theories of Personality - Fall

Credits: 3

This course focuses on the principles and theories of normal personality development and adjustment, with emphasis on stress, coping skills and communication. By completing this course, students should be able to explain how to cope with common problems encountered at each stage of the adult life-cycle, demonstrate an awareness of how to derive greater fulfillment from his/her relationships with others, show improved communication skills by learning the basic ways people communicate, and identify his/her own needs and motives, and analyze how these impact on our relationships by discussing the role of childhood experiences, physical constitution, and the environment in forming our needs and motives

Prerequisites: PSYC 131

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Science, Psychology


PSYC 251 Developmental Psychology

Credits: 3

This course considers the development of an individual from conception through adolescence. By completing this course, students should be able to describe their own childhood and explain the influence it has had on shaping their adult personality, identify the main content areas in the study of human development and describe and critique the impact of governmental policies on children so as to become informed participants in shaping public policy.

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Science, Psychology, Majors, Early Childhood Education, Physical Education, Endorsements, Athletic Coaching, Early Childhood Education, Health, K-8 English/Language Arts, K-8 Social Studies, Physical Education


PSYC 271 Statistics for the Behavioral Sciences - Fall

Credits: 3

Students will be introduced to statistical techniques used to conduct behavioral science research. Methods are presented which make possible inferences about a population from knowledge of small samples. Methods of measurement and techniques available to summarize sets of data will be discussed. The course will stress an understanding of conceptual issues involved in the selection of statistical methods rather than memorization of formulas.

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Science, Psychology


PSYC 310 Introduction to Forensic Psychology – Fall

Credits: 3

This course is a critical examination of the relationships between psychological research, practice, and theory and the law and legal system. Topics that may be considered include standards and assessments of legal competencies, mental state defenses, civil commitment, violence risk assessments, eyewitness identifications, (false) confessions, deception detection, jury behavior, child custody disputes, the roles of psychologists in the courtroom, and ethical issues in psychology and the law. By completing this course, the student will be able to demonstrate the understanding of how psychology and law combine and answer psycho-legal questions as well as apply the appropriate ethical code and guidelines within forensic psychology.

Prerequisites: PSYC 131; recommended prerequisite: PSYC 361 or PSYC 324 and CJ 231

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Science, Psychology


PSYC 324 Child Psychopathology - Fall

Credits: 3

The purpose of this course is to help students understand the continuum of normal and abnormal human development. The course approaches the topic by combining developmental and abnormal psychology perspectives. Students will be able to describe, discuss, implement, and appraise the major theories of the causes and treatment of developmental psychopathology. They will gain knowledge of the process of evaluation, diagnosis, and treatment of childhood disorders. In addition, students will gain an understanding of the influence of biological, cultural, and familial contexts on human development.

Prerequisites: PSYC 131 or PSYC 251

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Science, Psychology


PSYC 326 Introduction to Counseling - Spring

Credits: 3

This course covers the basic principles and techniques of counseling. By completing this course, students will be able to articulate the major approaches to counseling (e.g., action-oriented therapies, experiential/emotive-oriented therapies, cognitive-behavioral therapies, group approaches, and systems approaches), demonstrate specific skills commonly used in counseling, understand common issues typically faced by counselors, appreciate the mechanics of the healing process, and understand career possibilities in the field of counseling.

Prerequisites: PSYC 324 or PSYC 361 (or permission of instructor)

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Science, Psychology


PSYC 336 Motivation and Emotion - Spring

Credits: 3

The purpose of this course is to help students learn ways of thinking usefully and critically (i.e., carefully) about human behavior, through understanding motivation and emotion. Understanding motivation and emotion can aid one in thinking usefully and critically about human behavior - something useful not only in psychology and human services professions, but in many areas of human life. Students will be able to describe, discuss, implement, and appraise the major theories of motivation. In addition, students will be able to identify the major causal indicators known to affect emotion/mood.

Prerequisites: PSYC 131

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Science, Psychology


PSYC 361 Abnormal Psychology - Spring

Credits: 3

This course surveys a range of major pathological behavioral patterns identified by the DSM-IV-TR and discusses the theories and diagnoses of these patterns. By completing this course, students will be able to differentiate the major models of abnormal behavior and their implied methods of intervention, identify the basic types of mental disorders, and explain the major issues confronted in abnormal psychology.

Prerequisites: PSYC 131 or PSYC 251

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Science, Psychology


PSYC 365 Psychology of Addiction

Credits: 3

This is a multidimensional course that focuses on the psychological, biological, social and family system variables found within addiction. By completing this course, students should be able to describe and discuss the facts and concepts of addiction, identify the functions, meanings, models and at-risk factors of addiction, recognize and describe the effects of family dynamics in the arena of dependency, and describe interactions within interventions and treatments of addiction.

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Science, Psychology


PSYC 366 Death and Dying

Credits: 3

This course is designed to provide an opportunity to explore and examine a multitude of concepts involved with death and dying. Theoretical and philosophical consider- ations will be addressed, as well as moral, ethical and religious aspects that surround the subject of death. By completing this course, students will be able to describe and discuss the historical and contemporary implications and aspects of death and dying, identify basic legal and moral considerations related to death, recognize values in relationship to death, dying and life, and identify the characteristics associated with grief, as well as the methods in which to assist the bereaved.

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Science, Psychology


PSYC 367 Cognitive Psychology - Fall

Credits: 3

This course provides an in-depth exploration of human cognition, focusing on both classic and current issues. The study of cognition relies heavily on experimental research designed to test models and theories of cognitive processes, and students will explore both behavioral and neuropsychological approaches to data and theory. Topics will include attention, perception, multiple memory systems, encoding and retrieval processes, the role of knowledge, language, and reasoning.

Prerequisites: PSYC 131

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Science, Psychology


PSYC 372 Positive Psychology - Spring

Credits: 3

This course explores how and why people thrive and experience well-being. Positive psychology is the scientific approach to understanding people’s strengths and promoting positive functioning. Students will be able to describe, discuss, implement, and appraise the major theories of the factors related to psychological well-being. In addition, students will gain an understanding of the influence of biological, personal, cultural, and social contexts on human well-being.

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Science, Psychology


PSYC 374 Psychology of Gender - Spring

Credits: 3

This course introduces students to psychological theories and research exploring issues relevant to gender, including gender development and construction, gender stereotypes, gender discrimination, sexuality, and relationships. This course provides an overview of gender similarities and differences across a range of important life domains. Students learn to recognize the impact of gender in everyday life, as well as its role in society. Students are challenged to explore the complexity of gender.

Prerequisites: Offered spring alternate years

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Science, Psychology


PSYC 377 History and Systems of Psychology - Fall

Credits: 3

This course serves as the capstone course for the major. In it, students study the historical development of the discipline of psychology as well as contemporary systems and issues. By completing this course, students should be able to explain how the historical development of the field of psychology has led to its current state and the probable future directions of the field. The student will also be able to identify current issues in the field of psychology and key philosophical questions, such as free will versus determinism; materialism versus supernaturalism; the descriptive versus prescriptive approach; the relationship between subjectivity and objectivity; and the nature of the self/consciousness.

Prerequisites: PSYC 131 and Junior or Senior-level standing

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Science, Psychology


PSYC 380 Topics in Behavioral Sciences

Credits: 3

Selected topics in the behavioral sciences. This course will give the students an opportunity to focus on specific areas of psychology that are not covered in depth by other courses. Offerings will depend upon student and faculty interest and faculty availability. Possible topics include: Attitude and Attitude Change, Relationships, Group-based behavior, and Prosocial Behavior.

Prerequisites: PSYC 131

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Science, Psychology


PSYC 382 Biopsychology - Spring

Credits: 3

This course studies the development, structure, and functioning of the central nervous system in the context of its relations to principles and theories of human behavior. By completing this course, students will be able to identify the major centers of the brain and basic mechanics of brain functioning, explain the complexity of the memory process and how the mind and body affect each other, and summarize the dominant biological processes that interact with the mind to influence perception, emotion, and behavior.

Prerequisites: PSYC 131; also recommended prerequisite: BIO 211 or BIO 241 or CHEM 175

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Science, Psychology


PSYC 440, 441, 442 Career Applications in Psychology

Credits: 2-6

This course permits practical work experience in psychology for students who are unable to complete six hours of internship in a single semester due to class schedule or course load. The number of hours needed to complete credit hours in Career Applications will be the same as those required to complete internship credit hours. The difference is that Career Applications will spread the work over more weeks. Students successfully completing the course will demonstrate ability to apply psychology coursework to their work experience.

Prerequisites: Junior or senior standing and unanimous approval of the Science Division

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Science, Psychology


PSYC 497 Independent Study in Psychology

Credits: 1-3

This course enables students who are self-motivated to explore in depth a specific topic of interest to them that is not covered in other courses within the psychology major. Students will participate in periodic conferences and submit reports and papers. By completing this course, students will be able to demonstrate proficiency in their chosen topic of study.

Prerequisites: Junior or senior standing, Consent of instructor required

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Science, Psychology


PSYC 498 Internship in Psychology

Credits: 6-12

The internship allows for practical work experience in psychology. Upon successful completion of this internship, students will be able to describe their work experience, connect their work experience to their psychology coursework and articulate orally and in writing what they learned in their field placement.

Prerequisites: Junior or senior standing

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Science, Psychology


PSYC 499 Psychology Senior Seminar - Fall

Credits: 2

This course is designed as a capstone experience, which means that its purpose is to both unify and provide a broader context for knowledge about the field of psychology gained throughout the undergraduate years. Part of this process is exploring connections between both (1) oneself and the field of psychology and (2) the rest of the world and psychology. Students will achieve these goals by completing a senior research thesis, and connecting their previous course work with their Internship through discussion with their peers.

Prerequisites: Senior standing and PSYC 271 and SSCI 347

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Science, Psychology


REL 101 Introduction to the Bible as Literature

Credits: 3

An overview of the sacred texts of Jews and Christians. Inspiration, Creation, Salvation, and other biblical themes will be discussed, as well as key persons and events, such as Moses, Jesus, etc. Part of the course will be spent analyzing the literary genres used by biblical writers as a means of gaining insight into the kind of “truth” religious texts claim, and the relation of that truth to historical and scientific data. A third emphasis will be on the way biblical ideas have been appropriated in modern culture ( e.g. in religion, art and politics). Students who successfully complete this course will be able to: summarize the storyline of the Bible, identify the main characters, explain the important developments in the biblical portrayal of God and salvation, compare the biblical literature with corresponding works from ancient history, and summarize and critique the way the Bible is used in the modern world.

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Humanities


REL 102 Introduction to Religion

Credits: 3

This course explores issues that arise when human beings reflect on religious experience. Given religious experience, what does it mean? What is its status in relation to other aspects of life, and what are its basic elements and foundations? And what is religious experience really about—God, human needs, social habits, spirituality, all of the above? Students explore a wide range of views, assessing their various strengths and weaknesses. As a result of this course students will be able to: describe the various theories of the origin of the belief in God, explain why religion has persisted in spite of modern science, evaluate the benefits and liabilities of organized religion in the modern world, and offer a personal theory of the nature of religion.

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Humanities


REL 150 Introduction to World Religions

Credits: 3

An overview of the world’s major religious traditions, including the Eastern traditions of Hinduism, Jainism, Buddhism, Taoism, Confucianism, and the Western traditions of Judaism, Christianity, and Islam. Students will think empathetically and critically about religious claims, compare and critique major beliefs and practices of the religions studied, and reflect on the significance of religion in contemporary life.

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Humanities


REL 201 Introduction to the Hebrew Bible

Credits: 3

A study of Old Testament belief, literature, history and thought. The development of key personalities and religious themes and their influence in world culture are considered. Completion of this course will enable students to describe the content of the Old Testament literature and especially the changes in the conception of God as the Old Testament story progresses. They will also be able to explain the significance of the major events and non-biblical religions of the period for biblical religion, as well as demonstrate proficiency in the use of some of the critical tools used to place the Old Testament into its literary, cultural, historical and religious context.

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Humanities


REL 202 Introduction to the New Testament

Credits: 3

A study of the beliefs, literature, history and thought of the New Testament. Attention is given to the ministry of Jesus and the development of the Christian community, as well as to the influence of the New Testament in world culture. Completion of this course will enable students to describe the content and forms of New Testament Literature, outline the history of the Greco-Roman world during the 1st and 2nd Centuries CE, identify the main features of Greco-Roman religion and Judaism during this period, use some of the critical tools available to place the New Testament writings in their historical context, and clarify some of the main ways the New Testament influences modern life.

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Humanities


REL 265 War and Peace

Credits: 3

This course examines philosophical questions of war and peace, including the role of religions in making war and peace. It will consider the potential for both violence and peacemaking within several religious traditions, as well as secular and philosophical ideologies. Students will be able to reflect on the question of just and unjust wars, evaluate the ideas of pacifism and its alternatives, and consider how religion might be a resource for peacemaking.

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Humanities


REL 300 Religion in Western Civilization

Credits: 3

Presents an historical survey of religious practices, beliefs, and narratives in western civilization. Examines the major ways in which three western religions—Judaism, Christianity, and Islam—have responded to important historical crises, with special focus on how sacred stories have shaped these responses. As a result of this course, students will be able to identify the characteristics that all world religions share, explain the impact of social and scientific developments on the study of religion, compare and critique the major practices and beliefs of the Judaism, Christianity and Islam, and trace the historical development of each.

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Humanities


REL 302 Church History

Credits: 3

Survey of the development of Christianity from a small Jewish sect on the frontier of the Roman Empire to the world’s largest religion. Emphasis is on the major events, people and ideas that shaped Christianity’s past and provide models for its future. As a result of this course, students will be able to identify some of the most important events and personalities in Church History, explain their significance for modern Christianity and offer an evaluation of modern church experience and practice in light of this history.

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Humanities


REL 305 History of Christian Thought

Credits: 3

This course examines the development of Christian thought from its origins to the present. Students examine how Christian thought both shapes and responds to its historical context. Emphasis is on several key periods: Early fathers, Late Medieval, Reformation, and 19th century. Students will trace key themes and debates across this history, e.g., Church and State, Christology, Salvation, Revelation and Knowledge, and Christian Experience. As a result of this course, students will be able to describe the beliefs of some of the most important Christian thinkers, identify the various historical and modern trends in Christian thought, explain the implications of the history of diversity of Christian thought for modern Christian experience, and propose their own Christian view that embraces both the diversity and unity of Christian faith.

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Humanities


REL 306 Philosophy of Religion

Credits: 3

This course explores issues that arise when human beings reflect on religious experience. Given religious experience, what does it mean? What is its status in relation to other aspects of life, and what are its basic elements and foundations? And what is religious experience really about—God, human needs, social habits, spirituality, all of the above? Students will: explore a wide range of views, assessing their various strengths and weaknesses; demonstrate development of general critical hinking/reading skills; examine the roles that religious values play in human life; examine the ways religious ideas address the concerns of human life and; and develop skills for communicating their basic values and views to others.

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Humanities


REL 380 Topics in Religion

Credits: 3

Courses providing students with an opportunity to study ideas, movements and institutions in religion not ordinarily covered extensively in other courses. Possible topics include: Historical Jesus, Dead Sea Scrolls, Apocalyptic, Mystical Religion, American Religion, etc.

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Humanities


REL 440, 441, 442 Career Applications

Credits: 2-6

This course permits practical work experience in religion for students who are unable to complete six hours of internship in a single semester due to class schedule or course load. The number of hours needed to complete credit hours in Career Applications will be the same as those required to complete internship credit hours. The difference is that Career applications will spread the work over more weeks.

Prerequisites: Junior or senior standing and unanimous approval of the Science Division.

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Humanities


REL 497 Independent Study in Religion

Credits: 1-3

This course is designed for advanced students who wish to research and write a paper on a specific topic or do a special project in religion.

Prerequisites: Advanced standing, a written project proposal, and permission of instructor.

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Humanities


REL 498 Internship in Religion

Credits: 6

The internship allows for practical work experience in religion.

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Humanities


SCI 205 Elementary Astronomy

Credits: 4

A beginning course in astronomy. Topics to be studied include the motions of the earth and moon; time measurements; the planets; elementary techniques of measuring stellar distances, diameters, brightness; stellar evolution; galactic structure and cosmology.

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Science


SCI 206 Physical Science

Credits: 4

Selected concepts underlying present understanding of the physical science. Topics include motion and Newton’s Laws, energy, electricity and magnetism, chemical structure and reactions, and elements of astronomy, geology and metrology as time permits. Lecture demonstration and laboratory experience is included.

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Science


SCI 342 Earth Science

Credits: 3

An integration of geology and meteorology, in which the structure and development of the Earth will be emphasized.

Prerequisites: 4 hours of science

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Science


SOC 100 Introduction to Sociology

Credits: 3

An introduction to the basic concepts, principles, and theories of sociology. Special attention will be given to examination of individuals and groups in society; social class and conflict; social institutions such as family, education, religion, political organization; and social change. Students who successfully complete the course will be able to explain the above-mentioned social topics and to analyze the dynamics of various social situations.

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Science, Early Childhood Education, Endorsements, Early Childhood Education, K-8 Social Studies


SOC 205 The Family

Credits: 3

See PSYC 205 The Family

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Science, Endorsements, Health, K-8 Social Studies


SOC 230 Introduction to Social Work

Credits: 3

Survey of the field of social work. Types and range of “helping” programs under both public and private auspices. After successfully completing the course, students will be able to describe the field of social work and identify its various dimensions.

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Science


SOC 243 Social Problems

Credits: 3

This course is designed to present an enlightened analytical review, understanding, and interpretation of contemporary social problems within the context of broad social and structural forces that make America what it is today. Emphasis is on the links between specific modern social problems and broader structural issues of inequality and the economic priorities in the United States today. Strategies for dealing with or solving social problems will be explored. Those who successfully complete the course will be able to identify and analyze the elements of most of the major social problems, especially in the United States.

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Science


SOC 310 Race and Ethnicity

Credits: 3

This course will discuss the concepts of race, ethnicity, dominant group vs. the minority group status, human diversity as well as the concepts of discrimination, racism, attitudes, prejudice and stereotyping in this concept. It will also discuss various racial, ethnic, religious, nationality, linguistic, and cultural groups in the U.S. in particular, and the human diversity all over the world in general.

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Science


SOC 320 Social Organization

Credits: 3

A study of the structures and processes of social organization – from the small group to complex bureaucratic institutions. Attention will be devoted to exploring the nature of life in an “organizational society” and the relationship of organizations to their social, cultural, political, economic, and natural environment. Those who successfully complete the course will be able to identify basic principles of social organizations, as well as to analyze and evaluate specific organizations.

Prerequisites: SOC 100

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Science


SOC 380 Topics in Behavioral Science

Credits: 3

Selected topics in the areas of the behavioral sciences. This course will give the students an opportunity to study in some depth theories and research on topics which are generally not covered by the listed Sociology courses in this catalog in detail. Offerings will depend upon student and faculty interest, and faculty availability. Possible topics include: minority problems, science, technology, and social change, migration in America. Students successfully completing the course will be able to demonstrate understanding of the particular issue and the major concepts in the field.

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Science


SOC 420 Sociological Theory

Credits: 3

Study of the major classical and contemporary theories of society and social behavior, involving reading and discussion of the writings of major sociological theorists. Includes comparison of theoretical positions relative to location and cultural backgrounds of the theorists. Students successfully completing the course will be able to identify, compare and evaluate the major theoretical perspectives and the major sociological theories.

Prerequisites: SOC 100, or permission of the instructor

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Science


SOC 497 Independent Study in Sociology

Credits: 1-3

Periodic conferences, reports, and papers.

Prerequisites: Consent of instructor required.

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Science


SPED 297 Career Development & Transition for Students with Disabilities

Credits: 3

Legal requirements, career education models and interagency agreements for transition are discussed. Students will identify critical areas related to transition planning, community resources, and components of the IEP related to transition. Students will create an individual transition plan for a real or fictitious student that illustrates the concepts learned.

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Education, Majors, Endorsements, Instructional Strategist I: Mild & Moderate


SPED 306 Collaboration and the Family

Credits: 3

This course will focus on the early childhood educator and special educator’s role in the collaboration process and how it relates to: relationships with families of young children and students with disabilities, the general education process of schools, and with community agencies. Students will present an in-service for general educators demonstrating their understanding for the need for collaboration. This course is for students seeking early childhood education endorsement, elementary special education endorsement or elementary health endorsement only.

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Education, Majors, Early Childhood Education, Endorsements, Health


SPED 341 Characteristics of Special Education Students

Credits: 3

This course provides students with an overview of basic concepts and issues related to students with disabilities. Issues and best practices in special education services today are discussed, and will focus on both the similarities and differences among labeled and non-labeled students. Students will demonstrate their skill at developing appropriate individualized and classroom instructional strategies to address these differences.

Prerequisites: EDUC 301 Education of Exceptional Persons, EDUC 301

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Education, Majors, Endorsements, Reading


SPED 342 Diagnosis and Assessment of Students with Disabilities

Credits: 3

This course is designed to provide the student with knowledge and skills required for assessing diverse populations of mildly/moderately disabled school-age students using formal and informal assessment techniques. The course also provides knowledge and skills required for linking assessment findings to instructional planning, including development of the Individualized Education Program. Students will administer and interpret various assessments.

Prerequisites: EDUC 301 Education of Exceptional Persons, SPED 341 Characteristics of Special Education Students, SPED 344 Methods and Teaching Strategies for Students with Disabilities, EDUC 301, SPED 341, SPED 344

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Education, Majors, Endorsements


SPED 344 Methods and Teaching Strategies for Students with Disabilities

Credits: 3

This course introduces teachers to the educational needs of students with disabilities. Emphasis is placed on procedures for effective academic, behavioral and social integration of these children in the general education classroom. Additionally, this course is designed to increase awareness of students with special needs, and to assist teachers/prospective teachers in enhancing their general or special education classroom instructional strategies in dealing with individual students and differentiated instruction. Students will demonstrate the use of various research-based approaches to instruction.

Prerequisites: EDUC 301 Education of Exceptional Persons, EDUC 301

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Education, Majors, Endorsements


SPED 442 Practicum in Elementary Special Education (K-8)

Credits: 3-6

A full-time program of experience in elementary school special education. Students will present artifacts at the end of their practicum that demonstrate their ability to apply information learned in their coursework.

Prerequisites: All coursework listed on the Special Education Checklist and Full Admission to Teacher Education Program.

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Education, Majors, Endorsements


SPED 492 Practicum in Secondary Special Education (5-12)

Credits: 3-6

A full-time program of experience in secondary special education. Students will present artifacts at the end of their practicum that demonstrate their ability to apply information learned in their coursework.

Prerequisites: All coursework listed on the Special Education Checklist and Full Admission to Teacher Education Program.

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Education, Majors, Endorsements


SSCI 347 Research Methods - Spring

Credits: 3

This course teaches the basic principles and practices of the scientific method as applied to the behavioral sciences. By completing this course, students will be able to conduct a research project through all of its stages, including research design, implementation, analysis of results, and draft of a research paper. Students should also demonstrate proficiency in the broad research skills necessary for creating and testing hypotheses and in the evaluation of research in business, economics, psychology, sociology, criminal justice, education and biology.

Prerequisites: PSYC 271

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Science


SSCI 547 Research Methods

Credits: 3

This course teaches the basic principles and practices of the scientific method as applied to the behavioral sciences. By completing this course, students will be able to conduct a research project through all of its stages, including research design, implementation, analysis of results, and draft of a research paper. Students should also demonstrate proficiency in the broad research skills necessary for creating and testing hypotheses and in the evaluation of research in business, economics, psychology, sociology, criminal justice, education and biology.

Prerequisites: Standing Bachelor’s degree

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Science


WS 100 Wesleyan Seminar - Fall

Credits: 3

This course focuses on the academic study of Wesleyan theology as it relates to social justice and servant leadership. Aspects of the history of Iowa Wesleyan University relevant to particular themes of social justice will be explored. In addition, social justice themes in the areas of human, economic, and environmental issues will be related to current topics (e.g., women’s rights to education in today’s world). Instructors will guide learning about issues involved in social justice and human welfare in the local, regional, and global community, both in current and historical contexts. The course includes instruction about academic service-learning and completion of an academic- service project. This academic learning will be augmented by a required lab that includes workshops led by resource staff on campus and invited speakers. The lab will offer instruction in accessing University resources, developing social and academic strategies for success, and participating effectively within the Iowa Wesleyan University community. Students will understand and apply Iowa Wesleyan University’s Life Skills. Students will understand and apply strategies to enhance the well-being and success of the student, within the eight domains of wellness: social, emotional, physical, occupational, intellectual, environmental, financial, and spiritual.

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Wesleyan Studies


WS 110 Career Topics: Nursing at a Glance

Credits: 1

This course is designed to discuss the many roles nurses fill in today’s society. Students will learn that nursing is an international career which influences the health of populations. Discussion of the various specialties within the profession and graduate school will be explored. Learning what skills are important to be successful in the nursing program at Iowa Wesleyan University will also be discussed

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Wesleyan Studies


WS 300 Global Issues

Credits: 3

Upon satisfactory completion of this course, students will have a variety of perspectives on global events and issues and will understand the impact of their actions or inaction as global citizens.

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Wesleyan Studies


WS 310 Leadership and Service

Credits: 3

The Goal of WS 310 is to inform students about the value of servant-leader- ship and provide practical, experiential, and reflective lessons for students to become better servant-leaders. During the course students will model servant- leadership through a service-learning experience, explore connections between leadership theories and practice in discussions and reflective assignments, ap- preciate the role of servant-leadership in their professional and personal lives, and stimulate a goal-oriented vision of service and leadership for their future

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Wesleyan Studies


WS 315 Social Justice and Service

Credits: 3

Social Justice and Service will examine important issues of social justice and engage students in critical reflection on their role in being a social change agent. This is an experiential course that immerses students in face-to-face encounters with social justice issues by serving marginalized people groups in an urban or other setting and serving alongside other social justice advocates. Through this course students will be able to identify how social identities impact view of others, gain an understanding of the complex issues that con- tribute to oppression of marginalized people, including prejudice, and develop skills to create strategies and environments that advocate for the prosperity of others.

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Wesleyan Studies


WS 320 Leadership and Service

Credits: 3

Through this 8-week, online course, students will be paired with a non-profit organization in their local, regional, or global community to examine leader- ship issues within the organization and offer their assistance as a model of servant-leadership. Purposeful reflection exercises will explore connections between leadership theories and their experiential service activities. Students completing this course will understand leadership theory, identify the impact of service upon diverse stakeholders, and analyze the connection between service and leadership

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Wesleyan Studies


WS 357 Human Relations with a Global Perspective

Credits: 2

This course will help students understand human relations and develop cultural competency. Students will demonstrate the acquisition of knowledge about and skill in interpersonal and inter-group relations that contribute to the development of sensitivity to and understanding of the values, beliefs, life styles, and attitudes of individuals and the diverse groups found in a pluralistic society. Using a range of learning activities, this class will provide students with a variety of perspectives on global events and issues, allowing students to understand the impact of their actions or inaction as global citizens. Students will begin to translate knowledge of human relations into attitudes, skills, and techniques which will result in favorable learning experiences for students.

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Wesleyan Studies


Division of Business

Majors

Business Administration

Minors

Economics
Business Administration

Mission of the Division of Business

The Mission of the Division of Business at Iowa Wesleyan University is to help students, through the study of business, become more aware of global issues, and to become better communicators, critical thinkers, problem-solvers, and ethical decision-makers.

 

Business Administration Major

The Business Administration major provides students with an essential foundation in business and skills for either direct entry into the work place or entrance to graduate programs in business. The primary objective of this major is to provide a well-rounded, business-oriented program in which students may achieve skills consistent with the Iowa Wesleyan University philosophies of critical thinking, problem solving, communication skills, and civic engagement.

 

The Learning Outcomes of the Iowa Wesleyan University Business Division are:

  1. Increase students’ written communication skills
  2. Increase students’ oral communication skills
  3. Increase students’ critical thinking skills
  4. Increase students’ problem-solving skills
  5. Increase students’ awareness of ethical decision-making
  6. Prepare students for a changing global environment
  7. Demonstrate integrated skills in the theory and practice of core business disciplines

 

Requirements for Business Administration Major:

  1. Complete the Business Division core curriculum requirements (55 semester hours), AND
  1. Complete three to five courses in one of the following concentration areas (9 – 15 semester hours). Please see a Business Division faculty member for specific concentration course options:
    1. Accounting
    2. Economics
    3. General Business
    4. Management
    5. Marketing

 

Note: Business Administration majors who pursue a concentration in General Business may not pursue any additional concentrations.

The Division of Business requires that a grade of “C-” or above be earned in all required courses, required support courses, and in all required electives.

 

Business Division Core Requirements (45 hrs.)

Complete all of the following:

BA 100

Survey of Business

3 hrs.

ECN 101

Microeconomics

3 hrs.

ECN 102

Macroeconomics

3 hrs.

ACTG 210

Introduction to Financial Accounting

3 hrs.

ACTG 211

Managerial Accounting

3 hrs.

ECN 240

Applied Statistics for Economics and Business

3 hrs.

BA 310

Principles of Management

3 hrs.

BA 320

Principles of Marketing

3 hrs.

BA 330

Business Law

3 hrs.

BA 340

Corporate Finance

3 hrs.

BA 350

Business Information Systems

3 hrs.

BA 370

Operations Management

3 hrs.

BA 419

Business Strategy

3 hrs.

BA 398/498

Internship - Internship

6 hrs.

Required Support Courses (10 hours)

Complete all of the following:

COMM 147

Introduction to Public Speaking

3 hrs.

MATH 171

Introduction to Statistics

4 hrs.

PHIL 215

Ethics for Life and Career

3 hrs.

Professional Development Requirements

Students must successfully complete all of the following sessions in the professional development series in order to graduate from Iowa Wesleyan University with a Business Administration degree.

Microsoft Certified Application Specialist requirement

BA 101A

Microsoft Outlook certification

1 hrs.

BA 101B

Microsoft Word certification

1 hrs.

BA 101C

Microsoft Excel certification

1 hrs.

BA 101D

Microsoft PowerPoint certification

1 hrs.

BA 101E

Microsoft Access certification

1 hrs.

 

The Microsoft Application Specialist certifications are developed and offered by Microsoft ® Corporation and are administered through Iowa Wesleyan University. It is recommended that students complete this program by the end of their sophomore year. At the latest, the program should be completed by the end of the fall semester of the senior year. There are no alternative mechanisms for students to complete their Business Administration degree without first becoming a Microsoft Certified Application Specialist.

Professional Development Series

BA 102A

Resume/Cover Letter Writing

0 hrs.

BA 102B

Job Search Success

0 hrs.

BA 102C

Interviewing Strategies

0 hrs.

BA 102D

Dress for Success

0 hrs.

BA 102E

Dining Etiquette

0 hrs.

BA 102F

Life after College

0 hrs.

 

The Professional Development Series workshops are administered through the Office of Career Development & Internships. It is recommended that students complete this program by the end of their junior year. At the latest, the program should be completed by the end of the fall semester of the senior year. There are no alternative mechanisms for students to complete Business Administration degree without first completing all six seminars.

Business Administration Minor for non-Business Division Majors (24 semester hours)

BA 100

Survey of Business

3 hrs.

ECN 101

Microeconomics

3 hrs.

ECN 102

Macroeconomics

3 hrs.

ACTG 210

Introduction to Financial Accounting

3 hrs.

ACTG 211

Managerial Accounting

3 hrs.

BA 310

Principles of Management

3 hrs.

BA 320

Principles of Marketing

3 hrs.

BA 330

Business Law

3 hrs.

Note: Students majoring in Business Administration may not pursue a minor in Business Administration

Economics Minor for non-Business Division Majors (25 semester hours)

BA 100

Survey of Business

3 hrs.

ECN 101

Microeconomics

3 hrs.

ECN 102

Macroeconomics

3 hrs.

MATH 171

Introduction to Statistics

4 hrs.

ECN 240

Applied Statistics for Economics and Business

3 hrs.

ECN 322

Money and Banking

3 hrs.

ECN 330

History of Economic Thought

3 hrs.

ECN 350

Economics of International Business

3 hrs.

Note: Students majoring in Business Administration may not pursue a Minor in Economics.

 

Major

PE 231 First Aid

Credits: 1

This is a basic first aid course. The students will learn how to treat various health problems including wound care through this course.

Ideal for: Courses, Descriptions, Division of Humanities, Division of Nursing, Division of Science, Psychology, Division of Business, Major, Business Administration, Minor, Business Administration, Economics